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transportation

Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET

Russian investigators say an "explosive device" ignited and ripped through a train car as it was traveling in between metro stations in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Monday afternoon. A second, unexploded device was found at a different metro stop.

Office of Gov. Dannel Malloy

The state Department of Transportation is sharing its prize money from the Q bridge with New Haven Promise students.

Lindsay Kinkade / Creative Commons

As Connecticut wrestles with the question of re-introducing highway tolls, Democrats and Republicans are at odds about whether the idea is feasible. A bill which would include tolls as a revenue raising source for transportation has already passed out of committee, and will be debated by the full House and Senate. 

Lindsay Kinkade / Creative Commons

Are tolls coming back to Connecticut? Yes, we’ve heard this before -- but the state Speaker of the House now says tolls are "inevitable."

This hour, we talk with Democratic State Representative Joe Aresimowicz and Republican leader, Senator Len Fasano about that and other budget decisions facing Connecticut lawmakers.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A late season winter storm is expected to hit Connecticut early Tuesday. Officials at the state and local level began announcing parking bans and school closings on Monday. A statewide travel ban goes into effect at 5:00 am on Tuesday.

Mrschimpf / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s special transportation fund could be insolvent within four years if lawmakers don’t take action to secure new revenues. That was the message from the governor’s budget team to members of the legislature’s transportation committee Friday. 

John H Gray / Creative Commons

Proponents of a plan to bring expanded intercity passenger rail service to western Massachusetts are getting support from Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy.

The promise of automated cars is that they could eliminate human-error accidents and potentially enable more efficient use of roadways. That sounds, at first blush, like self-driving cars could also mean traffic reduction and lower commute times.

But researchers aren't so sure.

Hesham Rakha is an engineering professor at Virginia Tech who studies traffic's flow — or lack thereof.

Loco Steve / Creative Commons

Opponents of a new rail bypass plan for shoreline Connecticut want to see intervention from state lawmakers. Two bills before the General Assembly would mandate that changes to the state’s rail service could only take place after referendums in affected communities.

In late December last year, the Federal Railroad Administration released the latest iteration of its plan to upgrade the Northeast Corridor, including rerouting the line in several places. The aim is to be able to accommodate much higher speed trains.

Connecticut's perennial debate over road tolls starts again this month, but this year there is more momentum after a state panel recommended automated tolling.

Gov. Gina Raimondo's position statement came as a welcome surprise to dozens of protestors gathered at the Statehouse Wednesday.

Residents and lawmakers had crammed into the Statehouse rotunda to protest federal plans to move rail infrastructure in parts of Charlestown and Westerly. Then, Charlestown Town Councilor Virginia Lee told the crowd the governor agreed with them.

John H Gray / Creative Commons

Train travel in the Northeast might soon be faster, more accessible and more reliable, but a lot of this relies on the federal government.

This hour — rail in Connecticut. Is it on the right track?

Gov. Malloy: "I've Had To Do Really Hard Things"

Jan 13, 2017
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dan Malloy faces low approval ratings and a fiscal crisis as he enters his seventh year in office. Speaking on WNPR's Where We Live, he said his popularity isn't his main concern in 2017. 

Hundreds came out New Year's Day to ride the train in New York City, cheering as it left the station. That may sound odd, but this wasn't just any subway or any old station, it was the stuff of urban legend: the Second Avenue subway line.

To understand the crowd, you have to go back to the 1920s when the idea for the subway line was first floated, but never left the station because the Depression hit.

The idea was revived again in the 1950s as a replacement for the elevated trains, but city planner Robert Moses decided to spend money building expressways instead.

Connecticut on the Cutting Edge

Dec 29, 2016
Yoan Carle / Flickr Creative Commons

From self-driving cars to 3D printing to hydrokinetic energy technology, New Englanders are at the forefront of the latest cutting edge tech. 

This hour, we explore the latest gadgets and tech trends and learn about their impact locally and around the globe.

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