WNPR

theater

Diane Sobolewski

Nearly 175 years after it was first published, A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens remains a holiday classic. The story has been retold many times in movie, TV, and stage adaptations.

Cameron Yee / Creative Commons

Thursday’s show by Garrison Keillor at the Warner Theatre in Torrington was canceled, just hours before it was due to go ahead.

Carol Rosegg / Westport Country Playhouse

This Sunday, The Westport Country Playhouse will bring together a panel of directors well-known for their productions of the plays of Shakespeare. The discussion will focus on how to bring the bard's words to life in the 21st century.

Diane Sobolewski / www.goodspeed.org

From his work on Wicked, to Pippin, to Godspell, to The Magic Show and more, few people have had such a hand in shaping the music of Broadway theater as Stephen Schwartz.

Angela George / Creative Commons

Sam Waterston says he's been been lucky to have good fortune in his career and personal life. He's been nominated multiple times for Emmy, Academy, and Tony Awards and he won Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards for performances playing men whose moral compass points north.  

Chion Wolf / WNPR

After 41 years, Trinity College music professor Gerald Moshell will retire at the end of the spring semester. He conducts his final concert at Trinity on Friday night.

There were once more than 20 operating theaters in downtown Bridgeport alone. They welcomed thousands of people each week, from workers just getting off their shifts at the city's factories to the kids that came every Saturday for Westerns. Today, only two are still standing, and they've been empty for 40 years.

Peabody Awards / flickr creative commons

For years, there have been rumors about things Louis CK may or may not have done to women. And for years, women have been saying that CK should address the rumors. He hasn't really, and so the rumors have stayed rumors so far.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

Cultural leaders are beating a hasty retreat from President Trump. 

Billy Rose Theatre Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations

Barbara Cook died this week at the age of 89. An award-winning actress and singer, she was a much-loved performer in top American musicals, and later launched a legendary career as a concert and cabaret singer.

Netflix

Netflix has marketed its new series "Ozark" as " 'Breaking Bad' plus Jason Bateman," which might make you picture... a funnier version of "Breaking Bad"? "Ozark" is not a funnier version of "Breaking Bad." If anything, it's a bleaker version of "Breaking Bad." And maybe even a more bingeable version of "Breaking Bad"? The Nose might just have an answer to that question.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Cory J. Mendenhall / US Coast Guard Academy

Last week, the "skinny" repeal of the Affordable Care Act died a buzzer-beating (and perhaps temporary) death on the Senate floor. The Ringer's Bryan Curtis notes that, "Minus the life-and-death part, it had the feel of an unexpectedly competitive Pac-12 football game that the country noticed in installments."

Cortney Novella / Courtesy New Zenith Theatre

A one-woman play opening Friday in downtown Waterbury takes a unique look at the complex, often hidden world of teenage relationships.

Colin McEnroe / WNPR

"What do festivals do?"

Whether it's a film festival or Edinburgh or the Venice Biennale or New Haven, we wonder what happens when you get a lot of creative stuff in one place.

Pete Birkinshaw / flickr creative commons

This week in pop culture: Delta and Bank of America decide Shakespeare is in poor taste. Megan Kelly decides Alex Jones is worthy of a platform. Senators John McCain and Richard Burr decide that Senator Kamala Harris shouldn't get to finish her sentences. And Bob Dylan decides to troll the Nobel committees.

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