WNPR

television

David Wilson / flickr creative commons

When Dr. David Dau "refused to volunteer" to give up his seat on United Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville earlier this week, aviation police forcibly "re-accommodated" him. And then we had what was maybe the first news cycle since the election that wasn't led by politics.

The Nose finally gets to weigh in, and it's an all-star Nose at that: Rebecca Castellani, Kinky Friedman, and Mellini Kantayya make up the panel.

Toto / flickr creative commons

It was kind of an odd week this week (as they all are). Kendall Jenner tried to save the world with a Pepsi. And then Barry Manilow came out at age 73. And then Don Rickles died at age 90.

S-Town Podcast/Serial Podcast/This American Life

S-Town is the new, wimpily titled, seven-hour, non-fiction, southern gothic novel of a podcast that the folks behind Serial and This American Life released all at once this Tuesday, and The Nose has listened to the whole thing.

Some of us even listened to it all at once this Tuesday.

20th Century Fox

James "Logan" Howlett -- Wolverine -- is maybe the only X-Men character to appear in every adaptation of the franchise to date, including now nine feature films. Logan, though, is different from the eight movies that precede it in certain ways. It's R-rated. It contains many utterances of certain four-letter words. It's incredibly, and graphically, violent. It's maybe more of a neo-western set in the future than it's a comic book movie.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

David E. Kelley is the writer and producer behind "Picket Fences," "Ally McBeal," and "The Practice." Jean Marc-Vallée is the director of "The Young Victoria," "Dallas Buyers Club," and "Wild." Their new HBO show, "Big Little Lies," stars Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, Shailene Woodley, and Laura Dern as feuding mothers in beautiful Monterey, California.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Every year at this time, as you may have heard, there's a big-old basketball tournament that goes on. And every year at this time, people in offices and in firehouses and in Rotary Clubs and in Atlantic Cities and in Las Vegases enter bracket pools, where they try to win a big-old pile of ducats by predicting just exactly how said big-old basketball tournament will go.

An interview about South Korea's political upheaval became one of the most popular things on the Internet on Friday, when the children of professor Robert E. Kelly became the inadvertent stars of his spot on the BBC.

HBO

Here's a familiar formula: stand up comedian + television cameras = sitcom. And, ultimately, that's the math behind HBO's new series "Crashing" starring Pete Holmes and executive produced by Judd Apatow. This show is a little different, though, from things like "Louie" and "Seinfeld" (and a lot different from things like "Roseanne" and "Everybody Loves Raymond") in that it's actually about Holmes's (character's) fledgling stand up career.

wackystuff / flickr creative commons

The Faust myth comes from a German folktale that's centuries old. But does a day of your life go by where you don't hear someone invoking the "I'd sell my soul for x" cliche?

Just look at coffee Twitter every morning.

Centralpark.com

Sam Waterston says he's been been lucky to have good fortune in his career and personal life. He's been nominated multiple times for Emmy, Academy, and Tony Awards and he won Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards for performances playing men whose moral compass points north.  

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

Join us on the Trinity College campus in Hartford Friday at 1:00 pm as The Nose picks apart this year's Oscar contest live at Cinestudio.

Carlos Duplessis / flickr creative commons

New York magazine's Will Leitch has called ESPN's documentary O. J.: Made in America a masterpiece, and now it's nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Documentary -- Feature category. The Nose watched all seven hours and 45 minutes of it, and it's all we're going to be talking about this week.

JD Hancock / flickr creative commons

  At 8:30 pm on Thursday, September 8, 1966, NBC aired the premiere of a new series called "Star Trek". The episode was "The Man Trap." The star date was 1513.1, in case you're interested in that kind of thing.

I am not interested in that kind of thing.

Amazon

"Sneaky Pete" is a new show on Amazon Prime created by Bryan Cranston and David Shore (who created "House M.D."). Giovanni Ribisi plays a con man (whose name is not Pete, you see) who gets out of jail and moves to Trumbull, Conn., to live with Pete's grandparents (who are not his own grandparents, you see -- even though they don't know that). And then it gets more complicated from there.

HBO

HBO's new limited series "The Young Pope" gives us Jude Law as the Pope. A young one, you see. On the face of it, and in its previews and trailers and such, the show seems... ridiculous? Is maybe the right word? Or maybe it just seems sort of Twin Peaksian, but set at the Vatican. Of course, ridiculous vs. Twin Peaksian is kind of a fine -- and super important -- distinction.

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