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Pete Birkinshaw / flickr creative commons

This week in pop culture: Delta and Bank of America decide Shakespeare is in poor taste. Megan Kelly decides Alex Jones is worthy of a platform. Senators John McCain and Richard Burr decide that Senator Kamala Harris shouldn't get to finish her sentences. And Bob Dylan decides to troll the Nobel committees.

When it comes to comedy, Late Night host Seth Meyers is clear about what drew him in: "I got into it because it looked like the most fun job in the world," he says. "And it has not led me astray."

Indeed, Meyers' resume is packed with fun. Before taking over the reins at Late Night, he spent 13 years at Saturday Night Live, first as a performer, then as head writer and the co-host, alongside Amy Poehler, of the show's "Weekend Update" segment.

Richard Kelland / flickr creative commons

TiVo. AdBlock. Ad-free subscription options. Cord cutting. The death of print.

There seem to be a lot of signals pointing toward the end of an industry.

Sean P. Anderson flickr.com/photos/seanpanderson / Creative Commons

Gun control advocates and families of the Sandy Hook tragedy are asking NBC to pull an interview with “Infowars” radio host Alex Jones. The conspiracy theorist has said on numerous occasions that Sandy Hook was a hoax.

Warner Bros. Entertainment/DC Comics

"Wonder Woman" isn't just the first big-budget, blockbuster movie about a female superhero (as if that isn't enough). It also had the biggest opening weekend for a movie directed by a woman (Patty Jenkins) in film history. Oh, and it's at 92 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, which puts it squarely in the territory of "The Dark Knight," "Iron Man," and "Spider-Man 2." Our all-woman (plus Colin) Nose went to see it.

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