WNPR

taxes

Donald Trump has proposed a very detailed tax plan — but his statements on the campaign trail don't always match what his proposal would really do.

For instance, at a rally in Scranton, Pa., Trump promised to "massively cut taxes for the middle class, the forgotten people, the forgotten men and women of this country, who built our country." During a town hall meeting on NBC's Today show, he said he believes in raising taxes on the wealthy.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin is continuing his effort to highlight the capital city's structural financial problems. And he's giving state lawmakers a few suggestions on how to fix them. 

To Regionalize or Not to Regionalize

Oct 20, 2016
BrianSwan / Creative Commons

Connecticut is home to some of the wealthiest Americans in the country, and yet its cities are among the nation’s poorest. Some say the first step to ending this inequality is to spread the wealth from thriving suburban areas to struggling urban areas.

This hour, we talk regionalization – will Connecticut ever embrace it as the state struggles with constant deficits?

Sikorsky Aircraft

The state of Connecticut has cut a deal with helicopter maker Sikorsky to keep the company’s headquarters in Stratford. 

It’s the 25th anniversary of Connecticut’s income tax. Opponents of that tax will tell you lots of reasons why it’s hurt the state. Proponents will tell you that it’s a necessary tool to pay for government services. But one reality has really taken hold over the last few years.

Why We Leave and Why We Stay

Aug 29, 2016
Nicolas Raymond / Creative Commons

Recently we did a show about the science of loving where you live and we heard from plenty of Connecticut residents who really do love living here. But that sentiment is not shared by everyone. Some residents say high taxes are driving them away to places like Florida and North Carolina.

This hour, we talk about out-migration from Connecticut. We also explore the number of people who are moving into the state — what’s known as in-migration. And we want to hear from you. Are you looking to leave Connecticut once you retire? If not, why do you want to stay here?  

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's been 25 years since the state of Connecticut began to levy an income tax. Facing a huge deficit and a partial government shutdown, the legislature agreed in special session to institute the controversial measure on August 21, 1991. Governor Lowell Weicker signed it into law the next day. 

Steven Depolo / Creative Commons

The state may be chronically short of cash, but some traditions still persist. Tax-free shopping week is one of them; the tax break begins Sunday. 

alancleaver_2000 / Creative Commons

Twenty-five years after it was first levied, what has the income tax done for Connecticut? This hour, we take a deeper look at this controversial tax -- including its impact on our state's economic and fiscal well-being.

A court in Spain has sentenced Lionel Messi, widely hailed as one of the best soccer players alive, to 21 months in jail for tax fraud. Messi 's father, Jorge Horacio Messi, received the same sentence, over not paying some 4 million euros in taxes.

Lauren Wellicome, Creative Commons

Airbnb, the home rental site, is the latest e-commerce company to succumb to Connecticut's campaign to bring its tax structure into the 21st century.

Rufusnunus / Creative Commons

Corporate tax incentives are becoming ever more controversial in Connecticut. Government watchdogs said Governor Dannel Malloy can take some heat out of the debate by signing a bill that would give greater legislative oversight.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state’s largest business organization seems to have angered legislative Republicans with its support of the proposed budget. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

A controversial bill that would have taxed Yale’s $25 billion endowment failed earlier this year. Now, Yale officials are speaking out against a proposed bill that could potentially increase taxes the university pays on some of its properties. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Tax liens might not sound like the "sexiest" topic. But for some property owners, they can mean the difference between keeping or losing a home.

This hour, we take a look at how these liens -- and, more specifically, the sales of these liens -- are affecting some of Connecticut’s most financially vulnerable residents. It’s the latest in our ongoing series with WNPR contributor Susan Campbell. 

Pages