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There’s always a lot of last-minute action at the state capitol when the legislative session’s about to end. But in the middle of a budgetary crisis - that action has ramped up.

Connecticut House Speaker Joe Aresimowicz, a Berlin Democrat, is blaming the Republican minority for his failure this week to have the House debate a bill that could lead to the return of tolls on Connecticut's highways.

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Advocates for the state's low income families say budget proposals to cut the earned income tax credit, or EITC, will have a negative effect on the economy and make the tax code less fair. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy is proposing additional major cuts to state spending in Connecticut as he addresses a widening budget deficit projected for next year. The biggest losers this time around appear to be municipalities: state aid to towns and cities is cut by $600 million. 

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Economic incentives like loans and tax breaks for companies have been a controversial subject in recent years. And now a new study shows Connecticut doesn’t follow national best practices in monitoring the effects of its own generosity. 

President Trump is set to sign an executive order on Thursday that aims to relax restrictions on political activity by religious groups without threatening their tax-exempt status.

Senate Republicans voted Wednesday night to rescind an Obama-era policy that allows states to offer retirement savings plans to millions of workers.

Retiree and worker protection groups say the move will hurt employees at small businesses.

Many small businesses say they can't afford to set up retirement savings plans, such as 401(k) plans, for their workers. That's a big reason why so many Americans aren't saving, says Cristina Martin Firvida, the AARP's director of government affairs.

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The Office of Fiscal Analysis reports that tax revenues are plunging. The state's 100 largest-income tax payers paid 45 percent less this year than last. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Battling lawmakers, a multi-billion dollar deficit, and the end of a gubernatorial era. April was -- without doubt -- an eventful month for state politics. 

This hour, we hear from the man at the helm of it all: Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy. With less than two years left to go, how does he plan to round off his second -- and final -- term in office? We find out and also we also hear from you.

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State lawmakers are up against deadlines this week to settle on a budget plan — one that tackles a nearly two billion dollar deficit next year. But so far all we’ve seen is a logjam in Hartford.

This hour, we find out what gridlock at the capitol could mean for the state’s future.

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET

The Trump administration Wednesday put forth a proposal that it labeled a "massive" tax overhaul, which would give big tax cuts to individuals and corporations and reduce the number of tax brackets and deductions.

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Lawmakers will examine a proposal to raise Connecticut’s sales tax this week. The Connecticut Conference of Municipalities wants to see an increase in the sales tax from 6.35 percent currently, to 6.99 percent. The idea is that the additional revenue should be given to cities and towns so they can control a rise in property taxes. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Marine Michael Zacchea had a job to do in 2004: train and lead the first Iraqi Army battalion after the U.S. disbanded the country’s military post invasion.

This hour, we revisit our conversation with Zacchea, and co-author Ted Kemp about their book The Ragged Edge which details the challenges Zacchea faced leading a diverse group of Iraqis. 

Mike Licht / Creative Commons

Presidential press secretaries usually keep a low profile. They don't typically try to control the room or get defensive or mean with reporters.  They don't typically break news or become the butt of jokes on late-night TV. They don't typically perpetuate information proven to be untrue and then assume a threatening manner when asked to support the claim. In short, Sean Spicer is a press secretary like few we've seen before. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin will present his budget to the City Council Monday, and he's projecting a $50 million hole. But he said a lack of clarity about the state budget is making the city's job harder. 

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