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taxes

Flickr Creative Commons, Jan Seifert

Today, the Supreme Court struck down an Arizona public financing law similar to the one in Connecticut. But campaign finance reform can be a little dry and hard to follow, so first, a little colorful history:

alancleaver_2000 / Creative Commons

Two types of small businesses in Connecticut have been pitted against one another in recent months by a controversial piece of legislation. The measure, which goes into effect July 1st, attempts to force Internet retailers to levy sales tax in the state for the first time.

As WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, some are calling it the “Amazon tax.”

This is North Cove Outfitters in Old Saybrook, where Iain McGowan is helping a customer.

State Budget Vote Close

May 2, 2011

Segarra Presents Budget

Apr 18, 2011
Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Tax Day

Apr 18, 2011
Chion Wolf

When critics say the state shouldn’t increase taxes on the wealthy, they often say that it’ll force the rich to leave Connecticut.  So, is it true?

Two new studies show - well, that’s it’s not true at all.  That other factors, beyond the tax rate, are what drives people to make decisions about where to live.  

Tax Day

Apr 18, 2011
Chion Wolf

When critics say the state shouldn’t increase taxes on the wealthy, they often say that it’ll force the rich to leave Connecticut.  So, is it true?

Two new studies show - well, that’s it’s not true at all.  That other factors, beyond the tax rate, are what drives people to make decisions about where to live.  

It can cost small businesses between $5,000 and $10,000 just to administer their tax returns each year. That’s the finding of a new survey, which calls for radical improvements to the tax code. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

The National Small Business Association conducted a survey of its members on how much time and money it takes them to comply with the federal tax code.

“The tax code is incredibly complex”

Legislators, municipal leaders and business people from Southeastern Connecticut have voiced opposition to a plan to tax the Millstone nuclear power plant. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Creative Commons

Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey are all talking about taxes and public sector unions.

It’s a different kind of conversation in the Northeast than they’re having in say, Wisconsin - but the rhetoric is still kind of hot.

Dannel Malloy dubbed himself the “Anti-Christie” (take that New Jersey!) and then got a nice write-up in the New York Times for what they called a “Better Budget” proposal without bombast.

The State of Big Biz

Feb 18, 2011
Chion Wolf

Governor Malloy says Connecticut’s “open for business” – but not everyone in the business community sees the same thing.

First it was United Technologies saying that Connecticut might be too expensive a place to do business.  Now, Aetna’s saying the same thing. Is it possible that big corporations are making plans to get out of the state? Today we’re joined by The Hartford Courant’s Dan Haar, to talk about the role of Connecticut’s big employers in the future of the state.

Can Malloy Win Without a No-Tax Pledge?

Oct 29, 2010
Photo by Paul Bass

As his opponent took a no-new-taxes pledge—and pulled even in the polls—Democrat Dan Malloy brought his gubernatorial campaign to the lunch-cart crowd by the hospital, determined to defend two unpopular positions with more than sound bites.

Days away from Tuesday’s election, Malloy at this last stage finds himself confronting the political version of those two verities facing all of mankind: death and taxes.

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