WNPR

Spotlight on the Arts

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

War and poverty displace millions of people around the world.

This hour, we hear from two Connecticut artists who have personal experience with the global refugee and migrant crisis.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

War and poverty displace millions of people around the world.

This hour, we hear from two Connecticut artists who have personal experience with the global refugee and migrant crisis.

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center / Creative Commons

The Caribbean -- its islands, its history and its people -- has had a profound influence on communities around the globe -- including Connecticut.

This hour, we talk with author Joshua Jelly-Schapiro about his new book, Island People: The Caribbean and the World

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In a world of buzzing smartphones, endless meetings and persistent deadlines, how can we be more in-tune with ourselves and more creative in our endeavors?

This hour, we talk mindfulness and creativity in the 21st century.

Robert Whitman

Regarded as one of the most imaginative and athletic dance companies on the planet, Pilobolus thrives on taking audiences where the rest of the dance world dares not.

GHAA

Nearly 20 years ago, I made my first visit to the Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts at its original site, just past Colt Park in Hartford, heading south on Wethersfield Avenue.

I pulled into a parking lot protected by a tall, chain-linked fence. It acted like a divider between a worn-out apartment building in the deteriorating neighborhood, and the old funeral parlor that had been resurrected as Hartford’s arts magnet high school.

The school has come a long way since then. Last month, it was honored as the nation’s top arts school by the Arts Schools Network.

Credit Christopher Gardner Photography

Packed inside a small travel bag and tucked away on a shelf in her cozy New Haven studio, artist Corina Alvarezdelugo keeps her precious scraps of fabric protected. Beyond valuable, these throwaways come in various textures, colors, and playful patterns, gathered long ago in her homeland of Venezuela. 

Juan Colon / Art Connection Studio

As his collection of paintings was spread across two tables, I asked artist Juan Colon about the large watercolor that’s become the postcard image for "Cityscapes: Uncommon and Familiar Beauty," an exhibition opening this Friday at the Art Connection Studio in Hartford.

Mark Ostow

At age 83, Ming Cho Lee knows the difference between a world that works and one that doesn’t, certainly when it comes to the stage. For the past six decades, the National Medal of Arts recipient and Tony Award winner has conjured up some of the most memorable scenic worlds of the American theater.

Elena Del Vecchio Rusnak could take The Lovely Bones and re-imagine it as a haunting, dream-like work of modern dance.

For her biographic short on Isadora Duncan, Rusnak skillfully mixed dialogue with choreography, shaping them into a soliloquy of sound and movement that brought to life the exotic 19th-century dance icon. 

Rusnak passed away earlier this week at age 68. 

Grant Halverson

Emerging from the shadows carrying a lifeless naked body, a primal-like figure takes a deliberate path in slow procession to center stage. When he finally arrives at the pool of white light, he lays down the load onto a jet-black pedestal, an altar of some kind; and this, his offering to someone, somewhere.

Mike Dunphy

When jazz vocalist Dianne Mower makes her way through a jam-packed house onto the tiny Japanalia stage on Saturday night in Hartford’s West End, odds are it will be an emotional and unifying moment for everyone within earshot.

T. Charles Erickson

There’s both irony and brilliance behind the story-telling style of "The Last Five Years," Jason Robert Brown’s two-character musical currently running at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven.

Diane Sobolewski

You could make the case that America’s obsession with sports really took hold thanks to baseball in the 1950s. When Broadway producer/director/writer George Abbott turned to "Damn Yankees" as his next musical in 1955, the timing couldn’t have been more perfect.

Sandy Aldieri / Perceptions Photography

Looking back isn’t something Wesleyan University’s Center for the Arts is much interested in doing. 

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