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Mike Acton / Creative Commons

Twenty years ago, a lot of Icelandic teens were drinking too much. But an innovative program changed that.

This hour, we talk with the American researcher who helped combat the problem by tapping into natural highs — like sports. If the program has worked, why aren’t other countries following suit? We find out.

Michelle Jay / NWHL

The 2017 Women’s World Hockey Championships are later this month, and the U.S. team has won the last three titles. But its players may not even show up if they aren’t given what they are asking for: fair wages and support from USA Hockey.

The idea for an expansion soccer team in New Haven started two years ago over coffee in Brazil.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Every year at this time, as you may have heard, there's a big-old basketball tournament that goes on. And every year at this time, people in offices and in firehouses and in Rotary Clubs and in Atlantic Cities and in Las Vegases enter bracket pools, where they try to win a big-old pile of ducats by predicting just exactly how said big-old basketball tournament will go.

AnneCN / Creative Commons

Tuesday’s winter storm packed a punch -- bringing some much-needed precipitation to Connecticut.

But was the wet weather enough to hoist the state out of a long-running drought? This hour, we find out and ask whether the region can expect to see consistent dry spells. 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

UConn men’s basketball team survived a conference tournament opening round match-up with South Florida on Thursday night in Hartford.

Albert Yau / Flickr

On Thursday, Major League Baseball and the players association announced the elimination of the traditional four-pitch intentional walk. Instead of calling for pitches, managers could call for a "no-pitch" intentional walk, and the goal is to help speed up the game.

Courtesy Joe Coss

The job of a public announcer is unique. Joe Coss of Connecticut Public Broadcasting was making calls at Daytona 500 last week, and fresh off the plane, he came into our studio to talk about it.

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Carlos Duplessis / flickr creative commons

New York magazine's Will Leitch has called ESPN's documentary O. J.: Made in America a masterpiece, and now it's nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Documentary -- Feature category. The Nose watched all seven hours and 45 minutes of it, and it's all we're going to be talking about this week.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

UConn women’s basketball team extended its all-time NCAA record for consecutive wins to 100 in front of a sellout crowd of over 10,000 people in Storrs, Monday night. The top-ranked Huskies outlasted South Carolina, 66-55. 

Mike Maguire / Creative Commons

Democracy is so deeply rooted in American life that it’s hard to imagine another way of governing. But we may be living through through one of the most dangerous challenges to our democracy in a very long time.

The challenge won’t be obvious. We may not even know it’s happening because little will change...The economy will still grow, unemployment will stay low, we’ll still speak freely and hold elections.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

State Representative Patricia Dillon wants to re-examine what it means to "work through an injury" when it comes to student athletes. 

Adam Gault/Photodisc / Thinkstock

It's budget day! It's the day Governor Dannel Malloy unveils his budget proposal to the state. And what can we expect? Well, cities and towns may be on the hook for more money going towards teachers' pensions; the elimination of a $200 property tax credit; changes to the Education Cost Sharing formula; a transportation lockbox? 

Confronting Youth Homelessness

Feb 6, 2017
Steve Hardy / Creative Commons

Year after year, hundreds of thousands of people find themselves homeless in the United States — including the young.

This hour, we explore local efforts to help homeless youth in Connecticut. What kinds of programs are out there to help them to not only find housing but employment, too?

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