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Frankie Graziano / WNPR

At first, the Team 3D Academy in Danbury, Connecticut, looks like a regular gym with kettlebells, free weights, and benches. But tucked all the way in the back, there’s a 16x16 wrestling ring.

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We live in a post-"The Gong Show" world. Any TV that you've ever heard anyone use the word "Dada" to describe -- David Letterman's entire career, for instance -- owes something to Chuck Barris's creation.

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The Yard Goats' mascots were first unveiled to the world in October, 2015, as the last part of a string of branding reveals that included merchandise, logos, logotypes, and uniforms, and that had begun with a Name the Team contest.

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For sports fans with disabilities, getting out to see your favorite baseball or basketball team can be a major hassle. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This year Ghana celebrates its 60th year of independence. Coming up, we discuss the significance of that milestone with members of Connecticut's Ghanaian community.

Plus: a preview of this weekend's soccer friendly at East Hartford's Rentschler Field (a.k.a. "The Rent").

It's U.S.A. vs. Ghana. Will you be watching?

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

 

After Zach Zaback struck his ball off the 11th tee, his mother sensed something was wrong with her son. So she did what any other mother would do—she went to him. But then, she thought better of it.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

 

Nick Bonino is a hockey player who was born in Hartford. He’s not just any hockey player—the Avon Old Farms product won his second straight Stanley Cup as a member of the Pittsburgh Penguins two weeks ago.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

In 2013, Jason Collins became the first active NBA player to come out as gay. We caught up with the seven foot, retired athlete during his visit to Connecticut for LGBT pride month.

This hour, we air our interview with Collins. We talk basketball, coming out in the world of sports, and more.

Pete Birkinshaw / flickr creative commons

This week in pop culture: Delta and Bank of America decide Shakespeare is in poor taste. Megan Kelly decides Alex Jones is worthy of a platform. Senators John McCain and Richard Burr decide that Senator Kamala Harris shouldn't get to finish her sentences. And Bob Dylan decides to troll the Nobel committees.

The Golden State Warriors earned their second NBA title in three years with a 129 to 120 win over the Cleveland Cavaliers in Oakland Monday night, led by All-Star forward Kevin Durant's 39 points and strong bench scoring.

Durant's stellar play all season and throughout the playoffs vindicated Golden State's massive payout to the superstar in a controversial off-season deal.

Fellow All-Star Stephen Curry added 34 points.

But it was Durant, who left Oklahoma City for Oakland at the end of last season, who carried the team.

Warner Bros. Entertainment/DC Comics

"Wonder Woman" isn't just the first big-budget, blockbuster movie about a female superhero (as if that isn't enough). It also had the biggest opening weekend for a movie directed by a woman (Patty Jenkins) in film history. Oh, and it's at 92 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, which puts it squarely in the territory of "The Dark Knight," "Iron Man," and "Spider-Man 2." Our all-woman (plus Colin) Nose went to see it.

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

I think the reality is that on Hartford’s whole 25-man roster, there are probably maybe two, maybe three guys who will go on to have Major League careers of any length. Could be a couple more, but it could be a couple fewer too.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

Most Connecticut schools have access to a track when they practice. The Academy of Science and Innovation, a CREC magnet school in New Britain, doesn’t.

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, children of all ages!

I always wanted to use that in a commentary, that wonderful circus introduction ballyhooed by the splendid ringmaster, but I could just never find the ideal spot.

Of course, had I, there would've been some people who'd say that a circus doesn't belong in with sports. But, hey, just because there's clowns around doesn't disqualify certain daredevils from being certified athletes ­­-- equestrians, tightrope walkers and those who fly through the air with the greatest of ease.

Updated at 4:11 p.m. ET

Through nearly four decades, at least five presidential administrations and seemingly countless Super Bowls and World Series, NPR listeners could depend on at least one thing in the ever-unpredictable world of athletics: Frank Deford. A mainstay on Morning Edition, the Hall of Fame sportswriter was public radio's scholar of sports for some 37 years before hanging up his cleats earlier this year.

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