science

The Colin McEnroe Show
3:22 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

So You Think You Can Fake a Vermeer?

The Colin McEnroe Show
3:12 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Animals Make a Lot of Noise, But Do They Make Music?

Where We Live
10:52 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Gut Check: Befriending Bacteria

creative commons

There are more bacteria in our bodies than there are human cells: about 10 microbes for every cell!

UConn microbiologist Joerg Graf says “If you took a person and removed all the human cells, you would still see the outline of a human body.”

So what are all these bacteria doing? And are they helping or hurting us?

Read more
Labeling Modified Food
5:29 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

In Connecticut, GMO Labeling Bill Passes, But Don't Look for Labels Right Away

Advocates for labeling genetically engineered food gather at Capitol. (May 21, 2013)
CT Senate Democrats

Connecticut lawmakers have passed a “first-in-the-nation” law, mandating the labeling of Genetically Modified Organisms or GMOs in food products. It’s headed to the Governor for his signature, but that doesn’t mean it goes into effect anytime soon.

Passage by the state house was the final step in a convoluted series of maneuvers that included a bipartisan agreement reached over the weekend. It requires any food meant for human consumption to have a label that says “Produced with Genetic Engineering.”

Read more
Discovery
10:20 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Yale Researcher Identifies New Dinosaur Species

Nicholas Longrich

You can add another species to the horned dinosaur family.

The recently discovered Judiceratops tigris is the earliest known cousin of horned dinosaurs like the Triceratops and Torosaurus.

Fossils of this species were found in Montana's Judith River Formation, but they were identified by Yale researcher Nicholas Longrich.

The numerous horned dinosaurs show how rapidly they evolved.

Read more
The Faith Middleton Show
2:17 pm
Wed May 29, 2013

Time Reborn, Revisited, and Reconsidered

Ben Grantham/flickr creative commons

Read more
Business
3:07 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Connecticut Farms Are Thriving

benketaro on Flickr Creative Common

Read more
Where We Live
11:03 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Labeling GMOs and Toxic Chemicals in Connecticut

Masahiro Ihara, creative commons

Vegetables that are genetically modified to resist pests have become a part of our daily diet, whether we like it or not. Several states have been considering legislation that would require the labeling of GMO products, but Connecticut could be the first to pass such a law. Opponents of the bill say there’s no health risk, and a law like this would pass on higher prices to consumers.

Read more
News
3:30 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

House Considers Bill On Dissection Choice

The legislature is considering a bill that would allow students to opt out of dissecting a dead animal at school.  WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports. State Representative Diana Urban supports the bill. "There are students who actually avoid going to biology class because they object to using an actual animal in their dissection...And I know there's a lot of teasing that goes on in the classes." Urban says students should have a way to choose to use a computer model or simulation instead. Some high schools already allow the choice, while others specifically don't.

Read more
Where We Live
11:05 am
Wed May 8, 2013

The Evolution Of Teaching Science

Flickr Creative Commons

Pennsylvania is no stranger to controversy surrounding the teaching of evolution. When the school district in the town of Dover required creationism be taught alongside evolution, it sparked a national debate. Ultimately, a federal court ruled that intelligent design is religious theory and not a part of science.

Eight years later, a study by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has found faith-based theories are still taught in Pennsylvania public schools and evolution often isn’t taught robustly, if at all.

Read more
Where We Live
10:37 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Getting Psyched about Science

Chion Wolf

How is science serving us? And how do we keep kids interested in the field? Those are the big questions we’re tackling today on the program with a panel of scientists and educators.

Microbiologist Arturo Casadevall says “all the major problems facing humanity are scientific problems” -- problems like climate change, pandemics, meteors. He says we need good scientists to deal with these problems. But how do we train the next generation of scientists?

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
3:46 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

The Future of Stem Cells

Idaho National Laboratory on Flickr Creative Commons

Read more
The Faith Middleton Show
1:34 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Regaining Balance

Ethan Sherbondy/flickr creative commons

Everybody gets knocked off course. How do you rebalance in an unpredictable world? Bruce Clements joins Faith to talk about the art of restoring balance. Are there go-to tactics that work for most people? Or is the answer different depending on what happens to you? What can we learn from others? How do you get perspective when the clear mind you need is clouded and confused?

Read more
News
12:38 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Pfizer Will Tear Down Empty Lab Space in Groton

Harriet Jones

Drug giant Pfizer says it’s going to tear down 750,000 square feet of unused laboratory space on its Groton campus. As WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, the move comes after frantic efforts in recent months to find a reuse for the facility.

 

Read more
Mystic Aquarium
12:16 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

No Flipper? No Problem!

Mystic Aquarium

An 8-month-old harbor seal pup has successfully recovered from a flipper amputation and is now on view at Mystic Aquarium.

She's called Pup 49, and when she came to Mystic Aquarium last summer she was in pretty bad shape.

"Pup 49 was very thin, she came in with a respiratory infection and she had lots of wounds all over her body, but very severe wounds on her rear flippers," said Mystic Aquarium veterinarian Dr. Allison Tuttle. She added that the wounds got very infected over time.

Read more
Where We Live
12:00 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

Retiring Research Chimps, And Our Unique Human Evolution

Tambako the Jaguar, Creative Commons

We all know the story. Monkeys in a science lab, top secret research, something goes terribly wrong. It’s no surprise that most cinematic attempts to depict research like this ends up focusing on what happens to the humans.

But what about the ethics of this research, and what it means for the test subjects? In many cases, chimpanzees have been seen as viable in research because of their close relationship to humans.

Read more
Where We Live
12:16 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

From Your Freezer To Antarctica: All About Ice

Timothy Englert

Today, we’re talking about ice --- and no, not because of today’s weather.

But the icy regions of our planet are telling us important information about our climate. Ice locks in historical data that researchers are just starting to unlock. They’re finding greenhouse gases trapped during the industrial revolution and even the results of nuclear arms testing.

Read more
New Study
4:03 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Salt Could Be Behind Rise In Autoimmune Diseases

Dr. David Hafler is chairman of Yale's Department of Neurology. He's been studying multiple sclerosis for several decades. His lab looks at T-cells known as "helper cells," which are meant to assist the immune system, but do the opposite in diseases like Type 1 diabetes. He says the cells went wild when they removed them from blood and added salt: "The surprise of the study was the degree to which salt could induce as much inflammation both in the mouse and in vitro."

Read more
Renewable Energy
9:47 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Hundreds Drawn To Solar Energy In Connecticut

Read more
Where We Live
10:06 am
Mon February 25, 2013

Insuring Interplanetary Acts of God

navicore, creative commons

When a meteor exploded in the sky above Russia’s Ural mountains, damaging cities and injuring thousands, at first it seemed like an event out of a movie, about alien invasion or a nuclear attack - or the end of the world.

Ultimately - we learned that it was simply a natural phenomenon that occurs from time to time - if very rarely. But just how rare is this type of celestial visitor? And are we prepared for the risk?

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
2:43 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

The Science & History Of The Christmas Story

Ralph and Jenny, Flickr Creative Commons

How much of the Christmas story is true?

Most scholars will tell you the December 25th date has much more to do with pagan festivals of the early Christian era. If you want people to celebrate something, pick a date when they're already celebrating.

Read more
Repairs & Contracts
6:14 pm
Tue December 4, 2012

Connecticut Science Center Still Litigating Faulty Roof

It's been about three years since the the Connecticut Science Center sued some of the contractors who built it, looking to recoup some of the money it lost from a faulty roof. Now, as WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, the science center has resolved some -- but not all -- of those claims.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
3:10 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

The Science & Psychology Of Lucid Dreaming

The Grinch of dreaming is J. Allan Hobson.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
3:03 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

What Is Now?

Flickr Creative Commons, Robert S. Donovan

OK, this is potentially one of our weirder shows. 

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
3:55 pm
Fri July 6, 2012

The Nose: Anderson Cooper And Higgs Boson Come Out

Chion Wolf

After years of speculation, rumors, and whispers, we finally heard this week what we had long expected. The only problem is I can't tell whether I'm talking about the Higgs boson or Anderson Cooper.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
3:45 pm
Mon June 18, 2012

Attack Of The Invasive Species

prilfish, Flickr Creative Commons

The problem with invasive species is, of course, that they compete for resources with local species, and sometime they're a lot better at it. and sometimes they just incidentally wipe something out. 

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
12:43 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Jack Hitt Chronicles 'A Bunch Of Amateurs' In Latest Book

Flickr Creative Commons, Horia Varlan

Jack Hitt will speak at R.J. Julia Booksellers Thursday, May 17, at 7 p.m.

Today I got into a Twitter debate with a guy who thinks the press spends too much time covering candidates who aren't really legitimate contenders.

I'm on the other side of that these days. I told him I think anybody running should be invited to the debates.

Read more
The Colin McEnroe Show
2:40 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Fringe Physicists

Caption & photo used with permission - Jim Carter

Somewhere in the United States today, an envelope will arrive at a university math or science department, and in it will be some person's paradigm-shattering idea -- a novel theory that drastically violates or disrupts settled science.

The world is full of outsider physicists and rouge mathematicians. And, of course, one or two of them are basically correct about something. Einstein worked in a patent office. Michael Faraday did not have a university degree.

Read more
The Faith Middleton Show
9:59 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Authors of Your Brain on Food and Holy Ghosts

Rusty Clark/flickr creative commons

Does what we eat control our thoughts and feelings? After many studies, a neuroscientist says it's true.

Read more
The Faith Middleton Show
2:49 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

Carl Zimmer on Our Planet of Viruses and the Author of Rethinking Depression

AJ Cann/flickr creative commons

While we're obsessed with keeping germs away, our go-to science guy, Carl Zimmer, says we and the planet are covered in viruses. Which ones are harmless and which can do us in?

Read more

Pages