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Environmental groups have drawn attention to sustainability and conservation, but insiders say movement leadership is overwhelmingly white.

This hour, we examine a lack of diversity in environmental activism and find out who’s working to change this.

Today is the 200th birthday of author, activist and abolitionist Henry David Thoreau.

Thoreau’s individualist views and distaste for government make him a hero to many people across the political spectrum. But it’s his role as a naturalist and an avid record-keeper that makes him a hero to many scientists. His notes are helping scientists like Boston University biology professor Richard Primack study climate change.

Victoria LaBarre was climbing out of a canyon and into a bright, vast, seemingly lifeless landscape when she started to experience an astronaut's nightmare.

"Suddenly," she said, "I couldn't breathe."

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Creative Commons

President Trump announced last month the U.S. would withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement — despite attention on the wide ramifications of climate change including its effects on where people can live.

This hour, we talk about why the phenomenon of “climate migration” has a global reach.

Climate scientists agree that this century is getting much warmer and that such warming will likely bring economic pain to the U.S., but economists aren't sure how much. Now, a team of scientists and economists, writing in the upcoming issue of the journal Science, says it can at least tell which parts of the country are likely to suffer the most.

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