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Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut

As Connecticut lawmakers decide where to cut state spending, advocates for early childhood education are concerned that the state could lose millions of dollars in long-term benefits if quality child-care remains on the chopping block.

Matthew / Creative Commons

A group of educators have proposed a plan to hire more teachers of color in Connecticut public schools.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

High school English class is usually a time to read books and write essays. If you draw pictures, you might get into trouble. But not in James Shivers’s English class at CREC Public Safety Academy in Enfield -- he actually asks his students to draw.

Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas/CT Mirror

A judge has temporarily halted the state’s plan to allow more minority students into Hartford-area magnet schools. The decision came after a three-day court hearing in the ongoing Sheff vs. O’Neill case.

Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas/CT Mirror

Martha Stone is a lawyer for the plaintiffs in the Sheff v. O'Neill case, which settled over 20 years ago. She said the state's current position threatens to harm Hartford students. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The long-running Sheff vs. O’Neill school desegregation case heads back to court this week. 

rashida s. mar b. / flickr

The stereotypes around homeschooling have existed for decades. Since the modern homeschooling movement began in the late 20th century, those who favored this educational approach have largely been perceived as white, anti-establishment, radically Christian, and ultra-conservative.

mygueart/iStock / Thinkstock

The decades-long effort to desegregate Hartford schools and improve educational outcomes for its students is headed back to court. 

CTN

East Hartford officials want Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to visit the town’s school system, after she made controversial comments last week criticizing its standards. DeVos accused East Hartford High School of being what she termed a “dangerous daycare,” citing one of its former students. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Here's how journalist Gabrielle Emanuel described having dyslexia.

"I've come, very recently, to kind of think about it as a tongue twister, but for the brain," Emanuel said on WNPR's Where We Live. 

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

Sam Greenhalgh / Creative Commons

Dyslexia is considered the most common learning disorder and yet it is often undiagnosed and rarely understood.

This hour, we look to better understand the dyslexic mind.

Josh Nilaya / WNPR

Tyqua Gibson thought her 12-year-old daughter wasn't being challenged in Hartford Public Schools. So she sent her to Bloomfield through the Open Choice program -- a state-funded system that allows Hartford students to attend schools in one of 26 surrounding towns.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been a passionate proponent of expanding school choice, including private school vouchers and charter schools, and she has the clear backing of President Trump. But does the research justify her enthusiasm?

Experts say one single, overarching issue bedevils their efforts to study the impact of school choice programs. That is: It's hard to disentangle the performance of a school from the selection of its students.

Lori Mack / WNPR

New Haven is looking for partnerships and outside funding to help improve reading and literacy in the city’s public schools. This follows a new commissioned report, which includes a few costly recommendations.

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