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Chion Wolf / WNPR

Show me the money.

That’s the message from Hartford Superintendent Leslie Torres-Rodriguez in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. The disaster last fall uprooted many Puerto Ricans who fled the island, including children who ended up enrolling in Connecticut schools.

Students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., will once again walk the halls of their school Wednesday, exactly two weeks after many of them evacuated in single file lines, scared for their lives and worried about their friends.

Some students may still not be ready.

Many students and parents had a chance to go back into the school on Sunday for an orientation. They hugged and cried as they stepped inside for the first time since a former student, Nikolas Cruz, 19, killed 17 people when he shot an AR-15 in the freshman building on February 14.

Lorie Shaull (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Grading on the post-2016 scale, it was a relatively earth shattering revelation-free weekend. And so we have some time to regroup and take a look at more iterative developments in Mueller investigation- and Parkland-adjacent news.

Gloda/iStock / Thinkstock

It’s a simple plan: Run. Hide. Fight.

That's what the Department of Homeland Security advises people to do when there’s an active shooter. Police departments also use this method when training school employees, students, and increasingly, aspiring teachers.

Tom Moore's head of school security recently came to him with a suggestion: trauma bags. These are tools the military often uses in battle and include clotting agents to stop massive wounds. Schools are now stocking up.

"That's not something you do lightly," said Moore, superintendent of schools in West Hartford, Conn., a leafy suburb outside the state's capital city. "I want people to understand this is the reality. This is what we have to do."

Moore said it's a sad state he finds himself in — buying items used by armed forces for teachers.

C-Span

Connecticut's congressional delegation reacted strongly as images of the Parkland school shooting flooded TV screens and social media Wednesday afternoon.

Michael Gil / Wikimedia Commons

The nation is waking up to another devastating tragedy—this time, a school shooting in a Florida high school. Police say 17 are dead, more than a dozen others have been hospitalized. The shooter, a former student, is in custody.

Alberto G./flickr creative commons

Connecticut schools performed about the same as they did last year on the state's accountability system. 

Jim Finley - Principal consultant to the Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding (CCJEF).
Chion Wolf / WNPR

A recent Connecticut Supreme Court decision found that the legislature, not the court, is responsible for decisions around funding the state's public schools. But that sparked a debate between an advocate and a lawmaker over where the responsibility actually lays.

Screenshot

Guilford police are continuing their investigation into the shooting death of a 15-year-old high school student.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Catherine Smith is Commissioner of Connecticut's Department of Economic and Community Development. This hour, she stops by for an update on the state's economy and manufacturing workforce.

Later, we also check in with Goodwin College President Mark Scheinberg. How is his school training the next generation of manufacturing employees? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Spectactors at Tuesday's Hartford school board meeting in the Naylor School auditorium.
Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

The Hartford school board voted Tuesday night to close two neighborhood schools this year, endorsing the first wave of a plan to downsize a school system with high needs and declining enrollment.

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy says the State Supreme Court decision on the state’s landmark education funding case should not stop policymakers from continuing to look for ways to close the achievement gap.

Connecticut's Supreme Court has rejected a claim that the state's educational funding formula is unconstitutional. 

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