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The Connecticut Supreme Court heard arguments on Thursday in a landmark school funding lawsuit. State officials are appealing a lower court decision, that ruled the state's funding system was unconstitutional.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A little over a year ago, Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher issued a sweeping decision in a landmark education lawsuit centered on the way Connecticut funds its public schools.

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

It's National Suicide Prevention Week -- a time to reflect on and raise awareness about an issue that touches thousands of Americans each year.

"Never forget" became a national rallying cry after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Yet America's schools — where collective memory is shaped — are now full of students who never knew because they weren't alive then. Many teachers now struggle with whether and how to teach the attacks and their aftermath.

According to one survey, only about 20 states include anything in depth about the events of that fateful day in their high school social studies curriculum.

And when they are taught, critics say, it's often through a narrow lens.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hartford schools are back in session -- though, this time, there’s a new superintendent in town.

Coming up, Dr. Leslie Torres-Rodriguez stops by our studios.

We talk about her vision for the district and answer your calls, tweets, and emails.

Do you have child in the Hartford Public School system? What questions do you have for its newest leader? 

Connecticut’s municipalities have blasted all sides in the ongoing state budget impasse. Town and city officials spoke out after Governor Dannel Malloy issued a report claiming that state aid to municipalities has grown more than 20 percent in the last five years. 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

The Connecticut high school football season starts on September 8. Players like Bobby Melms began practicing earlier this month.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Classes started on Monday at UConn's new campus in downtown Hartford. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

School districts could see even more severe cuts than originally proposed in Governor Dannel Malloy's executive order, which has proposed to slash another $100 million from schools.

Lori Mack / WNPR

Educators, administrators, parents and students have called on Connecticut legislators to finalize a budget. They met to highlight their concerns after the education commissioner’s annual back-to-school meeting in Meriden Tuesday.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

School budget issues may be particularly acute in 2017, but many athletic programs across Connecticut have dealt with flat funding for many years. And no district knows exactly how much money they will get from the state this year.

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

Lawmakers in Hartford still have no state budget in place — and that’s creating widespread fiscal uncertainty for cities and towns across Connecticut.

This hour, we hear from municipal leaders about how they’re responding. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

If state lawmakers don't pass a budget, then Governor Dannel Malloy said he plans to cut overall state contributions to schools by 25 percent through executive order. But the cuts won’t be distributed equally.

At MIT, bright young engineers are still asked to tackle devilish math problems on their way to a degree.

But officials at Boston Public Schools (BPS) are hoping they can turn their attention to the world outside. Like the problem the district faces each morning: how to get thousands of students to school using more than 600 buses without burning through too much money or learning time.

timlewisnm / Creative Commons

Connecticut officials praised the latest 11th grade SAT scores, saying that the state is further closing the achievement gap. But many students from the state's poorest performing districts remain far behind their high-achieving peers from other parts of the state.

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