After Superstorm Sandy in 2012, Kathy Hanlon's life crumbled. Her Long Beach, N.Y., home had no electricity, her family was traumatized and one of her sons was getting sick. On top of that, there was the bureaucratic maze of flood insurance.

"I cried many times because I was so angry when I got off the phone with the insurance company," Hanlon says. "It was demeaning. We had to send them things repeatedly. We had to wait for phone calls. We had to wait for people to come visit the house."

Federal Dollars Head To Metro-North For Sandy Repairs

Feb 11, 2015

Congressional officials from New York have announced an investment in Metro-North Railroad for capital improvement projects from Hurricane Sandy.

Cindy Cornett Seigle/Flickr

The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers has dire predictions for many of the coastline communities in Connecticut and Long Island.

A report released on Wednesday, "North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study: Resilient Adaptation to Increasing Risk," took two years and covered 31,000 miles of coastline along ten states. It says climate change is putting the region at risk of more flooding and more superstorms like Sandy in 2012.

Joeseph Vietri, with the ACE, said western Long Island and western Connecticut are particularly vulnerable, which is a problem because they're such heavily populated areas. "Not all of them have the ability and the wherewithal to pick up and just move," he said. "So there are entire cities, towns, and villages that are under direct threat."

Within four years, the town of Westerly experienced four major storms: the Great Flood of 2010, Hurricane Irene in 2011, Superstorm Sandy in 2012, and the February 2013 Nor’easter. Like many coastal cities and towns around the state, Westerly is also vulnerable to high tides that flood roads even without storms.

Two years after Superstorm Sandy struck the Northeast, hundreds of Staten Islanders are deciding whether to sell their shorefront homes to New York state, which wants to knock them down and let the empty land act as a buffer to the ocean.

Stephen Drimalas was one Staten Islander faced with this tough decision. He lived in a bungalow not far from the beach in the working-class neighborhood of Ocean Breeze. He barely escaped Sandy's floodwaters with his life.

scantaur/iStock / Thinkstock

A new federal report finds hospitals in Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey were not prepared to meet the challenges of Superstorm Sandy. 

Wavian / Creative Commons

September 11, 2001 changed a lot about America, including many changes that, by now, you barely notice. So did the Hurricanes and tropical storms --Katrina, Irene, and Sandy -- all of which reshaped how and where we live.

The shooting spree that left 26 dead at Sandy Hook Elementary school was the most focused of tragedies, but we’re still adapting and coming to terms with what that disaster means to us.

Greg Thompson / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Nearly two years after Superstorm Sandy pounded the northeast, communities in Connecticut, New York, and Rhode Island are preparing to track down and remove debris from marshland. 

Alan Yu / WNPR

A corner of a Hartford's Elizabeth Park became a construction site last weekend, but this wasn't just any ordinary project.

Even on a chilly day in March, hundreds of people came to watch. The organizers hope the community will continue to feel a strong connection to the playground that was built.

A group called the Sandy Ground Project is building 26 playgrounds as living memorials to the children who died in the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. 

DVIDSHUB / Creative Commons

A few weeks ago, we held a conversation about the Connecticut Department of Children and Families’ proposal to open a second locked facility for juvenile justice involved girls. It’s a project that has been at the center of intense debate across the state, as many wonder if it’s the best treatment option for at-risk youths.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is going to examine how the state of New Jersey spent $25 million of the federal aid it received after 2012's Hurricane Sandy, Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., has announced.

Jan Ellen Spiegel / WNPR

The state is opening two new disaster assistance centers on Wednesday to help residents who suffered losses during Superstorm Sandy. One is a mobile center, serving Middlesex County. The other will be located at the Groton senior center. 

Jan Ellen Spiegel / WNPR

This week marks one year since Superstorm Sandy slammed into the northeast, causing deaths, destroying homes and businesses, and reshaping Connecticut’s shoreline. The storm also caused leaders to rethink our response to major environmental events.

Jan Ellen Spiegel

Governor Dannel Malloy pointed small businesses in Connecticut who were affected by Superstorm Sandy to a new state website, Connecticut Recovers, to apply for a share of $10.5 million in federal grants. The site is intended to streamline the process of filing for relief.

Officials said a fire that raged along the famous boardwalk in the New Jersey Shore last week was caused by faulty electrical wiring likely damaged by last year's Hurricane Sandy.

The Newark Star-Ledger reports:

Seeking the Calm After the Storm

Jul 1, 2013
Paul Pfeffer

It has been a long time since Michael Gordon had fished at Silver Sands State Park in Milford.

“See that building right there,” he said looking back to what was his house until “I got kicked out …fire department.”

Back then he sought snappers, bluefish and stripers

Today he came to “Kind of decompress a little bit, I should be down here more often”

The people and the shoreline…still reconnecting eight months after the devastation of Superstorm Sandy.

For the CPBN Media Lab, reporting from Milford, I’m Paul Pfeffer

Connecticut Lags in Use of Sandy Relief Dollars

May 30, 2013

More than six months have passed since Superstorm Sandy devastated the tri-state region and many people are still struggling. Money from the congressional Sandy relief bill is already helping those in New York and New Jersey. But Connecticut lags behind.

In Fairfield Beach, you can hear the constant whir of construction. Some recently raised homes look like they’re standing on long stilts 12 or 14 feet above ground. Many others are marked for demolition or are already empty lots.

On some streets, things look normal, until --

Connecticut lags behind in use of Sandy relief dollars

May 30, 2013

More than six months have passed since Superstorm Sandy devastated the tri-state region and many people are still struggling. Money from the congressional Sandy relief bill is already helping those in New York and New Jersey. But Connecticut lags behind.

In Fairfield Beach, you can hear the constant whir of construction. Some recently raised homes look like they’re standing on long stilts 12 or 14 feet above ground. Many others are marked for demolition or are already empty lots.

On some streets, things look normal, until --

This is the third in a series of stories examining vulnerable areas on our shoreline. 

Connecticut's beaches are still struggling to recover after Superstorm Sandy. So in the next storm they may not be so effective at absorbing floodwaters before they reach houses and other critical infrastructure.

Dru Nadler

Coastal towns in Connecticut are already gearing up for another hurricane season less than a month away. This is the second of a three-part series examining vulnerable areas on Connecticut's shore. 

Yesterday I visited Morris Cove, one of New Haven’s most desirable neighborhoods right on Long Island Sound. Now, we head to a very different residential area on Connecticut’s coastline.

As the region struggles to recover from Superstorm Sandy, the next hurricane season is less than a month away. Here in Connecticut officials have their eyes on several areas along the coast that are particularly vulnerable to the next storm. This is the first in a three-part series examining areas on the state's coastline that could be in trouble.

As Connecticut’s coastal cities struggle to rebuild after Superstorm Sandy, it’s not clear how much money they’ll have to fortify themselves against future storms. For properties in flood plains that’s a particular concern. Residents of a public housing complex on Norwalk’s waterfront have been waiting for action for decades.

City of Bridgeport

Many of Bridgeport’s residents are complaining that city plows never made it to their streets after last week’s blizzard. But once the snow melts, the city will be left to deal with the promise of more storms and danger to its coastline. That will be a challenge, since mayor Bill Finch has staked economic development on bringing people back to the water.

Putting Climate Change in the Transportation Budget

Feb 15, 2013

As the state continues to remove historic amounts of snow from roads, no one yet knows what the price tag will be. One thing is certain: It will have an impact on the state’s transportation budget.

Chion Wolf

Sometime today, the US House of Representatives may vote on an aid package to help victims of Superstorm Sandy.  That 9 billion dollar aid package is only about $51 billion smaller than the Senate bill that House speaker John Boehner walked away from without taking a vote.

Meanwhile, the congress has put a band aid on the tax issue that was taking us over the fiscal cliff.  The deal will keep taxes from going up for most Americans - but kicks down the road spending cuts.

The National Flood Insurance Program promises help for businesses and homeowners caught in devastating weather events like Sandy. But it’s a huge burden on taxpayers, and some critics argue that it encourages building in flood-prone areas. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports on how new rate increases for the program might affect its future.

Nearly 40% of small businesses that sustain severe flood damage in natural disasters subsequently close down. Pop’s Grocery on Main Street in Bridgeport is struggling to stay off that list.

Courtesy USDA (Creative Commons)

We've talked on WNPR's Morning Edition about the Emerald Ash Borer, the tiny green Asian beetle that feeds exclusively on the ash tree and has decimated millions of ash trees in over a dozen states. It has been recently discovered in several towns in Connecticut.

Superstorm Sandy has thrown a wrench in the effort to contain the Emerald Ash Borer. Joining us by phone is Chris Martin, Director of Forestry for the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

Patrick Emerson (Flickr Creative Commons)

On Monday, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, announced the end of gas rationing in his state.

But two weeks after Sandy hit, it’s still hard to find gasoline in parts of the tri-state area. A rationing system is still in effect in New York City and parts of Long Island. So, what happened? Why aren’t we able to get enough gas to the places that need it?

Sujata Srinivasan

If you’re a business owner affected by Superstorm Sandy, you may be eligible for a loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports from a FEMA Disaster Recovery Center in Bridgeport.

One Week After Sandy

Nov 5, 2012
Jan Ellen Spiegel

It’s been one week since Sandy hit, and the state and region are still clearing up. While Connecticut has not suffered anything like the damage inflicted on New Jersey or Queens, thousands are still in the dark - and it’s unclear how this might all affect tomorrow’s election.

We get an update on power outages from Connecticut Light & Power's Frank Poirot. We'll also hear from Greenwich's First Selectman Peter Tesei. That town was rocked by Sandy and many are still without power.