research

The Colin McEnroe Show
12:43 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Jack Hitt Chronicles 'A Bunch Of Amateurs' In Latest Book

Flickr Creative Commons, Horia Varlan

Jack Hitt will speak at R.J. Julia Booksellers Thursday, May 17, at 7 p.m.

Today I got into a Twitter debate with a guy who thinks the press spends too much time covering candidates who aren't really legitimate contenders.

I'm on the other side of that these days. I told him I think anybody running should be invited to the debates.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:40 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Fringe Physicists

Caption & photo used with permission - Jim Carter

Somewhere in the United States today, an envelope will arrive at a university math or science department, and in it will be some person's paradigm-shattering idea -- a novel theory that drastically violates or disrupts settled science.

The world is full of outsider physicists and rouge mathematicians. And, of course, one or two of them are basically correct about something. Einstein worked in a patent office. Michael Faraday did not have a university degree.

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Aging
8:17 am
Wed March 14, 2012

The Aging Brain - Lost In Transition

Brunosan, Flickr Creative Commons

As the brain ages, it becomes harder to know when its time to move from one task to the next. That’s according to a new study by Yale University researchers, who say understanding how the brain ages may help an older workforce.

The study is called Lost in Transition. Mark Laubach, an associate professor at the Yale School of Medicine, came up with the title after waiting to buy a ticket at the Washington, DC train station. He was anxious to get back to Connecticut to see his son play in his first Little League game.  

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Where We Live
10:40 am
Thu December 8, 2011

Studying The Chaos Theory

Gardener41, creative commons

Mark Demers is a Fairfield University Professor who just got a grant to study “chaos theory.” Could the gentle flap of a butterfly wing in China set off a tornado in Texas? He’ll study the evolution of systems that change over time and attempt to understand their stability and predictability.

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Coming Home Project
6:45 pm
Mon October 17, 2011

A Therapy for Veterans and Others With PTSD

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Ars Electronica

Airdate: October 17, 2011 A recent Pew Center study of U.S military in the post 9-11 era found 37 percent of veterans suffer from post traumatic stress. For those diagnosed with PTSD and who are getting care at a VA facility, one of the treatments used is Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing or EMDR. It's therapy to resolve trauma related disorders.

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Where We Live
10:22 am
Wed July 6, 2011

Combating Food Allergies

vizzzual

Thirty years ago, food allergy was extremely rare. Today, about 5.9 million U.S. children under 18 suffer from this potentially life-threatening condition.

That’s 1 in every 13 children. Or, to look at it another way, one student per classroom has a food allergy. What’s more, nearly 2 out of every 5 affected children suffer from a severe food-allergy.

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First Five
1:25 pm
Tue July 5, 2011

Do Corporate Tax Breaks Work?

State and local governments collectively give more than $70 billion a year of incentives to lure business and jobs. Connecticut’s latest tax break deal is called First Five – and it aims to create a thousand new jobs in the state. But critics of the program say that once again, the state is focusing too much on big employers and not enough on small business. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Gene Bartholomew is an HVAC technician. A few years ago he was working as a factory rep for Carrier, a division of United Technologies.

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Agriculture
11:49 am
Wed June 15, 2011

Griswold Farm To Showcase Research

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station is hosting an open house on Thursday at its research farm in Griswold. WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports scientists will showcase their work on forestry, farming and invasive species.

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The Faith Middleton Show
4:57 pm
Mon June 13, 2011

Toxins in Our Lives Could Affect the Intelligence of Babies in the Womb

woodleywonderworks

We are all shaped by our genetic inheritance and by the environment we live in. Indeed, the argument about which of these two forces, nature or nurture, predominates has been raging for decades. But what about our very first environment—the prenatal world where we exist for nine months between conception and birth and where we are more vulnerable than at any other point in our lives?

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Where We Live
10:33 am
Thu May 19, 2011

The Science Of Annoying

Editor B, Creative Commons

You’re on the train, listening to only one half of somebody else’s inane conversation.  That is so annoying!

What else annoys you?  Lip-smacking at the dinner table, slow drivers in the left lane, someone singing (ever so slightly) off key.  Let’s see, I’ve gotten some of these from people: Close talkers, crying kids on a plane, the toilet seat left up (sorry ladies), texting during a movie (or during dinner, or during an important conversation)...

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Where We Live
10:28 am
Mon May 16, 2011

Roots of Prejudice

Linda, Creative Commons

Prejudice is one of the more troubling and baffling aspects of human nature

It has been the subject of scientific study for years.  But while social psychologists have learned a great deal about attitudes and societal influences that cause intergroup conflict, little effort has been devoted to understanding how adult humans come to have these biases in the first place.  So a Yale study set out to discover the roots of human prejudice, by studying groups of rhesus monkeys.

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Climate Change
7:27 pm
Mon May 2, 2011

Report on RGGI: Carbon Emissions Up Slightly

A regional agreement between ten states calls for reducing carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. This week the non-profit group, Environment Northeast, released its annual report analyzing how greenhouse gas emissions have changed in the region. 

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Where We Live
10:24 am
Tue April 26, 2011

The Science Of Annoying

Editor B, Creative Commons

You’re on the train, listening to only one half of somebody else’s inane conversation.  That is so annoying!

What else annoys you?  Lip-smacking at the dinner table, slow drivers in the left lane, someone singing (ever so slightly) off key.  Let’s see, I’ve gotten some of these from people: Close talkers, crying kids on a plane, the toilet seat left up (sorry ladies), texting during a movie (or during dinner, or during an important conversation)...

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Research
3:33 pm
Thu March 24, 2011

StemConn 2011

Stem cells hold the promise of treating a host of diseases in the future. Today in Farmington, some of the top Stem Cell researchers in the country gathered to share the latest discoveries in this new technology.

Every two years, Connecticut hosts StemConn, a full day symposium that looks at the latest research and trends in this promising technology. Stem cells have the ability to regenerate and replenish various tissue in the body, which could potentially treat diseases such as cancer, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis.

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Where We Live
10:46 am
Tue March 8, 2011

Tracking Lost Civilizations

National Geographic

Could it be true?!  The lost city of Atlantis has been found!  Well, not yet, but a University of Hartford archeologist is on the case.

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