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religion

U.S. Embassy Tel Aviv / Creative Commons

President Donald Trump’s declaration that the U.S. will recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital city, along with his announcement that he plans to move the U.S. Embassy there from Tel-Aviv, raised concerns among critics who say it could disrupt any hope for a long-awaited peace.

A father of three sought sanctuary from deportation in a New Haven church on Thursday after the Board of Immigration Appeals denied his request for an emergency stay of removal Wednesday night.

Voodoo Unveiled

Nov 29, 2017
Kunle Ogunfuyl / Flickr

Voodoo is more than just a misunderstood religion, its practice draws on age-old beliefs, cultural elements, and folk traditions from a multitude of nations and ethnic groups.

Willie Stark / Creative Commons

I have traveled to three foreign countries since President Trump was elected. While I have always been proud to be American, even as I criticize much in my country, I was humbled by what people thought of America in the countries I visited. They were puzzled by our health care system, and appalled by our guns and voter apathy. 

Fronteiras do Pensamento / flickr creative commons

Richard Dawkins is probably the best-known ethologist and evolutionary biologist in the world. And he's maybe the best-known atheist and secularist -- he would say "rationalist" -- in the world.

Kate Solomson Nichols

Investigators are trying to figure out who posted racist flyers in Southington last week. The same leaflet was also spotted in Bristol. The leaflets follow a predictable, and disturbing pattern, which is becoming more prevalent in Connecticut, according to the Connecticut Anti-Defamation League, who tracks hate incidents in the state.

Kris Krüg/PopTech / flickr creative commons

Kurt Andersen's new book is Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire. It's a 500-year history "of America jumping the shark." The idea, largely, is that our present post-fact, fake-news moment is... nothing new.

This hour, we look back at the history. We look at our present -- which is to say, we look at our present president: "To describe [Trump] is practically to summarize this book," Andersen says in Fantasyland. And we wonder if there's any way to regain and retain reality in America.

Julian Povey / Creative Commons

Novelists have been writing for decades about worlds in which the climate is in crisis. Those stories are becoming increasingly realistic -- in a sense, the future is already here.

Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs Office Follow / Creative Commons

Make room, troops. Last week, the Boy Scouts of America unveiled a major decision -- starting next year, the organization will begin admitting girls. Yes, that’s right. Girls.

While the news has been met with applause by some, others have expressed more critical views -- including the Girl Scouts. This hour, we find out why. 

Hatim Kaghat / Creative Commons

Until about 150 years ago, most people  were born into a religion that carried them to adulthood. That's no longer the case. 

wikimedia

With the threat of nuclear weapons from North Korea, questions about the future of the Iran nuclear deal, and more aggressive, nationalistic rhetoric coming from the U.S president -- could we see nukes being used again?

Angela George / Creative Commons

Sam Waterston says he's been been lucky to have good fortune in his career and personal life. He's been nominated multiple times for Emmy, Academy, and Tony Awards and he won Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards for performances playing men whose moral compass points north.  

Curt Richter, Chion Wolf / WNPR

Colin McEnroe is taking a couple weeks off, so today Chion Wolf introduces you to three Connecticut residents who have careers in very different fields of expertise.

Copper Beech Institute

Recently, I hopped into my car to go home after a long and grinding first day back to work. I had just returned the day before from a two-week vacation exploring the treasures of two foreign countries I had never seen before. 

The abrupt transition from play to work left me feeling quite blue, made worse by my receding memories of those weeks. Something in me needed music.  So, I traded out my usual afternoon newscast for a "soul" song that caught my ear and brightened my heart. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

In a small church in one corner of Connecticut, a massive musical project has been underway this summer.

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