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This hour, we talk about the neo-Nazi rallies in Charlottesville, VA, where one person was killed and many injured after a driver plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters. 

The aftermath of the violent protest and counterprotests in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend continue to reverberate across the country — sparking discussions about race and the country's Civil War past.

Mourners gathered in Charlottesville on Wednesday to remember Heather Heyer, who was killed on Saturday when a car rammed into a crowd of people protesting the white nationalist rally. Attendees were asked to wear purple, Heyer's favorite color, in her memory.

Updated at 6:05 p.m. ET

In a press conference on Tuesday, the president of the United States appeared to equate white supremacist marchers with counterprotesters who recently clashed in Charlottesville, Va.

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET Tuesday
By the end of the day on Monday, three CEOs had announced they were leaving President Trump's American Manufacturing Council. Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier was the first to announce his resignation followed by Under Armour's Kevin Plank and Intel's Brian Krzanich.

The resignations came after Trump was criticized for his response to the violence at white supremacist events in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. The president, famous for his ability to be direct and forceful, was faulted for condemning violence "on many sides."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Coming up: We find out how researchers are working to preserve the world's most endangered languages -- including a look at locally-based efforts to expand fluency of the Mohegan language.

But first: reaction to the weekend’s news out of Charlottesville.

We check in with former Virginia residents and we also hear from you.

How do you interpret this latest incident of racism and violence? Do you worry that something similar could happen here in Connecticut? 

Updated Aug. 12 at 10:04 p.m. ET

Three people died and about 35 were injured in a day of violence that began with clashes at a white nationalist rally on Saturday in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said.

One of those killed was a 32-year-old female pedestrian who was hit by a car that plowed into marchers, authorities said. The driver of the car, James Alex Fields is being held on charges including second degree murder. Police say he's from Ohio.

Ben Zeiger

In “Nani,” filmmaker and Hartford native Christopher Brown goes back to his North End roots in his latest film. "Nani" is a slice of Hartford street life, and gets a showing this weekend at Trinity College.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy has released a follow-up to last year's report looking at traffic stop data and racial profiling in Connecticut.

Multiculturalism / Creative Commons

Race is a myth; racism is not. I'm stealing this line from Gene Seymour, one of our guests on our show today. 

Caroline Lester / WNPR

Two groups clashed in New Haven on Saturday. One group had come to hear a speaker known for promoting fascism. The other organized a counter protest. The clash resulted in several protester arrests.

Helge V. Keitel / Creative Commons

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 56 percent of women will be employed or looking for work by the year 2024 -- that's a nearly one percent decrease from 2015.

Still, investment in female leadership has grown at some workplaces -- including Connecticut-based United Technologies Corporation.

iStock

The rate of infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly has dropped in recent years, but data show that racial disparities persist.

Matthew / Creative Commons

A group of educators have proposed a plan to hire more teachers of color in Connecticut public schools.

NY Public Library

Long before the 19th Amendment recognized them as voters, a small group of women gathered at Howard University to create the first service Sorority founded by and for African American women. Alpha Kappa Alpha is part of a rich tradition of historically Black fraternities and sororities known as the Divine Nine.

Mamata.mulay / Creative Commons

We’re inching closer to the end of the fiscal year and Connecticut lawmakers at the state capitol still haven’t been able to reach a budget agreement. Meanwhile at the nation’s capitol, Senate Republicans are postponing a vote on their controversial health care bill.

This hour: a tale of gridlock in Hartford and Washington. 

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