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On the eve of the latest report into traffic stops and racial profiling in the state, The Connecticut Police Chiefs Association released a peer-reviewed study that questions the report's methodology.

U.S. Department of Education / Creative Commons

We all remember those groundbreaking classics -- from The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats to Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham. But who is writing, illustrating, and shaping the landscape of children’s literature today?

Kate Solomson Nichols

Investigators are trying to figure out who posted racist flyers in Southington last week. The same leaflet was also spotted in Bristol. The leaflets follow a predictable, and disturbing pattern, which is becoming more prevalent in Connecticut, according to the Connecticut Anti-Defamation League, who tracks hate incidents in the state.

In her day job, Chicopee, Massachusetts, attorney Tahirah Amatul-Wadud does family law -- divorce, custody, child support. But on her own time, she's filed civil rights lawsuits on behalf of Muslim communities who feel threatened, especially African-American Muslims like herself.

Feng Wei / Creative Commons

President Trump decertified the internationally-supported Iran nuclear deal Friday but didn't walk away from it. Instead, he kicked it to Congress to determine whether to reimpose sanctions even though the International Atomic Energy Agency has verified Iran was in compliance with the deal.

Facing increasing pressure for how it's chosen to handle the legacy of a children's book author with a mixed record on issues of race and prejudice, the new Dr. Seuss Museum in Springfield, Mass., has acknowledged a change is needed.

Two weeks ago he locked arms and knelt with his players before the national anthem, then stood with them as it played. Now, Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones says players who "disrespect the flag," won't take the field.

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With the threat of nuclear weapons from North Korea, questions about the future of the Iran nuclear deal, and more aggressive, nationalistic rhetoric coming from the U.S president -- could we see nukes being used again?

Race is again proving to be the sharpest dividing line of the Trump era.

This week, President Trump and conservatives went after ESPN, the cable sports network, for comments made by Jemele Hill, who hosts one of the flagship SportsCenter shows.

It all started on Monday when Hill, who is black, tweeted in reply to someone else: "Donald Trump is a white supremacist who has largely surrounded himself w/ other white supremacists."

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders called Hill's comment a "fireable offense."

A judge has acquitted former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley of first-degree murder in the shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith in late 2011. The verdict over Smith's killing has been highly anticipated — and it prompted protests outside the courthouse.

Here's an overview of the case from St. Louis Public Radio:

Editor's note: This story contains language that some might find offensive.

Seattle Seahawks star defensive end Michael Bennett says he is considering filing a civil rights lawsuit against Las Vegas police after a harrowing encounter last month.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

NAACP leadership in New London has requested a meeting with senior officers at the Coast Guard Academy after reports of racial slurs and bullying among the cadet corps. Meanwhile, members of the state's congressional delegation have written to the academy's superintendent, calling the allegations "disturbing."

Yale University said Tuesday it will remove a "problematic" doorway stone carving that depicts a Puritan settler aiming a musket at a Native American, a decision that follows criticism for initially covering up the musket with removable stonework.

Helge V. Keitel / Creative Commons

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 56 percent of women will be employed or looking for work by the year 2024 -- that's a nearly one percent decrease from 2015.

Still, investment in female leadership has grown at some workplaces -- including Connecticut-based United Technologies Corporation.

Stephen Melkisethian / Creative Commons

In the wake of the horrific events last weekend in Charlottesville, state legislatures are taking a second look at their hate crimes laws. Connecticut is ahead of the curve. Earlier this summer, the state legislature overwhelmingly passed a new hate crimes bill, one of the strongest in the nation.

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