psychology

The Colin McEnroe Show
11:38 am
Tue March 25, 2014

Hearing Voices

Peter Bullimore owns a training/consultant agency, Asylum Associates, and is the founding member of the Paranoia Network in England. He also holds a teaching and research post at Manchester University and is a published author on voices and trauma
Chion Wolf

Teresa of Avila very unambiguously reported hearing voices. She's a saint. John Forbes Nash heard voices. He won a Nobel prize. Robert Schumann heard voices that spurred him to write great music.

Philip K. Dick was guided by one inner voice, specifically female, that he would hear for much of his life. He probably holds the record for most film adaptations for words written of any author ever.

Mahatma Gandhi described a voice he could hear; not a metaphorical inner conversation, but a voice.

I could go on. Hearing voices is not that unusual. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:21 am
Tue March 25, 2014

Meet the King of Anxiety

Credit Jonathan McNicol

From Faith Middleton: Roughly 40 million Americans reportedly say they have struggled with anxiety issues. Why wouldn't we in such a surprising world? Still, there are anxiety sufferers and there are anxiety sufferers. Scott Stossel is one of the latter.

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Code Switch
7:03 am
Wed March 5, 2014

For Black And Latino Americans, A Glass Mysteriously Half-Full

Why are these stock photo models of color so smiley? (You could ask that question about all stock photo models of color.)
istockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 7:55 pm

Over the last few years an unusual phenomenon has kept popping up in public opinion surveys: Blacks and Latinos have become much more sanguine about the country's prospects as white folks have become more pessimistic. It's a stark reversal of decades of data in which white folks were almost always more optimistic.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:24 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Dreamland, a Cruise Through the Latest Sleep Research

RelaxingMusic/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: Science still can't say for sure why we need sleep, though we spend a third of our lives asleep, or trying to sleep. Those trying to sleep include the millions who have some sort of sleep issue, from insomnia to over-sleeping.

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Food Moods
7:55 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Sriracha Chemistry: How Hot Sauces Perk Up Your Food And Your Mood

Can you name the five main ingredients in Sriracha?
Reactions YouTube

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 11:33 am

Anyone who has ever drizzled, doused or — heck — drenched their food with Sriracha knows the hot sauce can make almost any dish taste better.

But could these spicy condiments also make us a little happier?

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New York
9:49 am
Sun February 23, 2014

N.Y. Becomes Largest Prison System To Curb Solitary Confinement

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 11:57 am

New York made sweeping changes this week to the way prisons use solitary confinement.

The deal, signed by a federal judge on Wednesday, was prompted by a federal lawsuit filed by critics who say thousands of inmates — some of them pregnant or mentally ill — are being held for months and even years in isolation, often for minor infractions.

Years Spent In Solitary

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The Faith Middleton Show
2:25 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Love 2.0

Credit Camdiluv ♥/flickr creative commons

Today's show previously aired on April 30, May 30, and August 29, 2013.  

We all know love matters, but today, positive emotions expert Barbara Fredrickson joins Faith to show us just how much. Even more than happiness and optimism, love holds the key to improving our mental and physical health as well as lengthening our lives. Using research from her own lab, Fredrickson redefines love not as a stable behemoth, but as micro-moments of connection between people—even strangers. She demonstrates that our capacity for experiencing love can be measured and strengthened in ways that improve our health and longevity. Finally, she introduces us to informal and formal practices to unlock love in our lives, generate compassion, and even self-soothe.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
8:39 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Pondering Modern Love

Credit Javie Delgado, Flickr Creative Commons

It's hard to improve on the poet, Rilke, who wrote, "Love consists of this, that two solitudes meet, protect, and greet each other." But did Rilke have to deal with Angry Birds and Snap Chat?

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Leave a message after the tone!
4:02 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

The WNPR Voicemail Project: All About Love

Is romantic love real? Does it live in your heart?
Tvanbr Creative Commons

On Thursday, February 13 -- the day before Valentine's Day -- The Colin McEnroe Show is talking about modern love, its staggering beauty, and its profound absurdity.

We'll hear from Laura Kipnis, the author of Against Love: A Polemic, and Dan Jones, an editor for the Modern Love column at The New York Times.

Here's where you come in. We want you to call our voicemail, and tell us your story about when you started or stopped believing in romantic love.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:40 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Seeking the Truth in Secret Societies

The all-seeing eye of the Illuminati
Credit New 1Illuminati / Creative Commons

The first secret society, according to Theodore Ziolkowski, a Princeton-based scholar on the literature of cults and conspiracies, "consisted of Eve and the serpent and then it just kept going," Ziokowski writes.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:25 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Mastering the Art of Quitting in Life, Love, and Work

Credit Kate Haskell/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: As we can see from a recent Planet Money story on NPR, millions of people are quitting their jobs each month, and Janet Yellen of The Fed thinks this is a good sign. She says if people are quitting in high numbers, that signals they're sure better jobs are available. In other words, a strong signal for the economy.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Albert Einstein: Inside the Brain of a Genius

Albert Einstein (left) and Hendrik Lorentz (right) in 1921.
Credit shehal / Creative Commons

In 1905, a young German physicist proposed an equation that would forever change our perception of special relativity. His name was Albert Einstein and his equation was E = MC2. Over a century later, Einstein’s theory of relativity still stands as one of science’s greatest achievements. It established Einstein as one of the 20th-century’s greatest celebrities, and one of history’s greatest thinkers.

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Stereotypes
1:55 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

New Study Suggests Exposure to Weight Stigma is Unhealthy

Credit Alliance/iStock / Thinkstock

Exposure to weight stigma actually causes physiological stress in women, according to a new Yale University study published in Psychosomatic Medicine.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Mon January 20, 2014

Can Music and Art Bring Countries Together?

Credit Nic McPhee/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired October 29, 2013. 

From Faith Middleton: Music and art can make your life bigger. And, under the theory that the world is now “flat,” music and art just might dissolve boundaries, making the world a more manageable place.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Mon January 13, 2014

How to Become Braver in Your Life

Credit Sheba_Also/flickr creative commons

Afraid to fail? Eager to please? Chances are you'd like to become more brave. Discover why people from all walks of life found some nerve and immediately felt more alive.

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Attempting Things
3:08 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

A Tribute To Failure

Topical Press Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 11:25 am

In a society where success is pursued and celebrated above everything else, where media stars, sport champions and the very rich are idolized, failure is seen as an embarrassment, something we must avoid at all costs and, when we can't, must be hidden from everyone else.

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Mental Health
3:48 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Mindfulness Meditation Can Help Relieve Anxiety And Depression

Western medicine has questioned the medical benefits of meditation.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 9:38 am

People are increasingly turning to mindfulness mediation to manage health issues, and meditation classes are being offered through schools and hospitals.

But doctors have questioned whether this ancient Eastern practice really offers measurable health benefits. A fresh review of the evidence should help sort that out.

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Anxiety
3:08 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Fear Of Fainting, Flight And Cheese: One Man's 'Age Of Anxiety'

Yuri Arcurs iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 8:09 pm

Atlantic magazine editor Scott Stossel has countless phobias and anxieties — some you've heard of, others you probably haven't.

"There's a vast encyclopedia of fears and phobias," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "and pretty much any object, experience, situation you can think of, there is someone who has a phobia of it."

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu January 2, 2014

An Asbestos Scandal Reaches Yale; The Mind of a Psychopath

Credit Digital Vision / Thinkstock

This hour, we talk with neuroscientist James Fallon. He found something shocking when he was looking at brain scans of serial killers. We’ll talk about his book The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain and what his research might tell us about Sandy Hook shooter Adam Lanza.

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Grim Reaper
3:27 am
Tue December 31, 2013

Nothing Focuses The Mind Like The Ultimate Deadline: Death

Could a countdown to death help you lead a more ecstatic life?
Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:38 pm

Ticktock. Ticktock. Ticktock.

The seconds left in 2013 are slipping away. And you know what else is slipping away? The seconds left in your life.

Luckily for you, there's a new product called Tikker, a wristwatch that counts down your life, so you can watch on a large, dot-matrix display as the seconds you have left on Earth disappear down a black hole.

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Advertising
4:32 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Energy Drink Companies Find Unique Ways to Market to Children

The Red Bull RC Helicopter.
Ray Hardman WNPR

In a press conference at the legislative office building in Hartford on Monday, U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal called on energy drink companies to stop marketing their product to children through toys bearing the energy drink's logo.

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Ommmm
1:37 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Cognitive Control, Focus for the Young Child

Credit Tiffany Assman, Creative Commons

Daniel Goleman is a psychologist and author who may be best known for his writings on emotional intelligence, an idea that challenges the old concept of IQ as the most important measure of one’s abilities. He joined Where We Live to talk about his new book FOCUS: The Hidden Driver of Excellence.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Daniel Goleman in Focus

Daniel Goleman
Credit danielgoleman.info

Psychologist and former New York Times reporter Daniel Goleman presented us with an important idea - “Emotional Intelligence” - it challenges the old concept of IQ as the most important measure of one’s abilities.

But his newest research might be even more important for our current world - filled with multiple screens and distractions. It’s all about “Focus.”

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Newtown: One Year Later
9:00 am
Thu December 12, 2013

Recovering from Trauma: Therapists Reflect on Their Work in Newtown

From left, Valerie Gillies, Dr. Karen Alter-Reid, and Michael Crouch, therapists with the Trauma Recovery Network of Fairfield County.
Credit Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

The discussion after last year's Newtown shootings was dominated by two topics: gun control and mental health. Many people focused on possible illnesses of the shooter, but there’s another side to the mental health discussion. In the aftermath of a tragedy, communities need help healing.

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Newtown: One Year Later
4:40 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

Newtown Decides Against Shooting Anniversary Event

Photos of Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre victims sit at a small memorial near the school on January 14, 2013, in Newtown, Connecticut. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:55 am

Residents of Newtown, Conn., have decided against a public commemoration to mark the first anniversary this coming Saturday of the shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School, which left 20 first graders and six educators dead.

Instead, the town is endorsing a “year of service” and is asking residents to put a candle in their window on Dec. 14, the day of the shooting, to show their commitment to the idea of service to each other.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:21 am
Tue December 3, 2013

The Trauma of Everyday Life

Credit shaire productions/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: I'm featuring New York psychiatrist Dr. Mark Epstein's fascinating new book, The Trauma of Everyday Life, because it explains the big pay-off for learning to notice the small and big traumas we all experience daily in an unpredictable world. By comprehending these traumas, he says, we permit their release, which leads to less stress and a greater sense of feeling fully alive. Dr. Epstein is a Harvard trained psychiatrist with a private practice in New York City. He's interested in the interface of psychotherapy and Buddhist philosophy.

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Microbes
3:07 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Gut Bacteria Might Guide The Workings Of Our Minds

Illustration by Benjamin Arthur for NPR

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 12:58 pm

Could the microbes that inhabit our guts help explain that old idea of "gut feelings?" There's growing evidence that gut bacteria really might influence our minds.

"I'm always by profession a skeptic," says Dr. Emeran Mayer, a professor of medicine and psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles. "But I do believe that our gut microbes affect what goes on in our brains."

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The Colin McEnroe Show
6:00 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Are We Born Moral?

Shanell Smith is an ordained minister and assistant professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at Hartford Seminary
Chion Wolf

In 1965, the Yale psychologist Stanley Milgram, spread stamped and addressed but un-mailed letters around public locations in New Haven. Most of the letters were picked up and mailed by strangers who could not possibly derive any material reward for doing the right thing. The strangers also lived out their values based on the address.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Bruce Clements: How We Are All Still Children

Credit Timothy Faust/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: How do we "curate" our own personalities—ditching self absorbed childish behaviors, yet maintaining a child-like sense of wonder about the world? Bruce Clements and I explore this human conundrum.

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Trick or Treat
3:58 am
Thu October 31, 2013

Why Are Kids Who Get Less Candy Happier On Halloween?

Kids might be more satisfied if they get one good treat instead of one good treat and one lesser treat.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 11:03 am

What makes trick-or-treaters happy is candy. And more candy is better, right?

Well, it turns out that might not actually be the case. A few years ago researchers did a study on Halloween night where some trick-or-treaters were given a candy bar, and others were given the candy bar and a piece of bubble gum.

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