WNPR

psychology

Everybody has this feeling that American Democracy isn't what we want it to be right now. It doesn't feel right, it doesn't feel like we're unified even about what the nature of our governance is. 

zenilorac / flickr creative commons

Numbers are so fundamental to our understanding of the world around us that we maybe tend to think of them as an intrinsic part of the world around us. But they aren't. Humans invented numbers just as much as we invented all of language.

Chris Gladis

I’m Chion Wolf and this is What’s Your Problem?!

Since Colin McEnroe is away, I’m taking over with a radio version of my live advice show, What’s Your Problem? Here’s the idea: A lot of people love GIVING and GETTING advice. There’s a connection there, there’s a feeling that you’re LESS ALONE there.

Amy Elyse / Creative Commons

The movie "Split," by director M. Night Shyamalan, is the latest in a long line of movies that portray people with "split personalities" as either violent psychopaths or comic foils. They portray dramatic changes in identity that don't reflect the subtle transitions that usually take between six and twelve years to properly diagnose.

Stephanie "TabbieWolf" Krus

Like just about anything else one delves into, the subculture known as furries is more nuanced, more varied and less sensational than mass media depictions of them.

Anita Friend / Flickr

If it's the clothes that make the man, then it's the costume that makes the superhero. But for as much as these brightly colored onesies reveal about their wearer, they may in fact reveal more about us as a society.

Bernard Goldbach / Creative Commons

The American Psychological Association says the 2016 presidential election was a major source of stress for a majority of Americans regardless of political affiliation. 

Logan Prochaska / Creative Commons
Mark Turnauckas / Creative Commons

The Rorschach inkblots are ubiquitous throughout culture. They've inspired visual artists from Warhol to Alan Moore, from Gnarls Barkley to Jay Z, to the Watchmen comics. The inkblots have also become a perfect metaphor for today's polarized, relativist world. 

JT / Flickr

Americans like to argue, a lot. In politics, in media, and in society at large, arguing has (arguably) become the default means by which we handle disagreement. But is it the most effective way, and has our readiness to wage a war with words gotten out of hand?

AKZOphoto / Flickr

There is perhaps no figure more emblematic of the paranormal than the psychic. Able to predict the future, see into the past, and even communicate with the dead, the psychic's awesome gifts are matched only by his or her ability to withstand skepticism and ridicule.

Anjan Chatterjee

I find great joy in walking in the dead of winter along the river trail near my house. Everything leaves my mind as I watch the Canadian geese take flight, their wings flapping together as they lift and swoop over my head. I'm in awe of their beauty.

NIH / Creative Commons

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a social disability that leaves the autistic isolated and confused in a world in which they can't understand the social cues others take for granted. To compensate, some use the internet as a way to learn about sexuality that non-autistic people learn about through relationships. 

Spiked Online / Flickr

All cults are not created equal. From the wide array of beliefs they teach, to the variety of people who are involved, cults are as different from each other as are officially recognized religions.

Vito Fun / Flickr Creative Commons

Every year, we do a Song of the Summer show. It always makes people angry. There is no evidence that it has ever made people happy. A lot of it has to do with the way we define the term.

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