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pollution

Trump Digs Coal, And GOP Candidates Skip Climate Forum

Jul 17, 2018
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

By skipping a forum on climate change Monday night, the five Republican candidates for governor saved themselves from two unpalatable options: Defending the Trump administration’s love affair with coal to furious environmentalists, or riling the GOP base a month before the primary by publicly breaking with the president.

James Vaughan / Flickr

Humans are great at making a mess of things. So far, however, that mess has been confined to Earth. But as we develop into a spacefaring species, our capacity for destruction, pollution, and prejudice (towards aliens of earthly and unearthly origins) threatens to have cosmic consequences.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen said he welcomes the resignation of Scott Pruitt, who headed up the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

vladdythephotogeek / Creative Commons

Officials in Connecticut and New York are praising a federal court decision, which says the Environmental Protection Agency needs to do more to control air pollution.

A draft water pollution permit for a regional wastewater treatment plant on the Connecticut River in Springfield, Massachusetts, is now back in the hands of the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Margo Fontaine / Creative Commons

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced more than $8 million in “brownfield” remediation grants, money that will fund assessments and cleanups of old industrial sites throughout New England.

"Starman" in Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster with Earth in the background
SpaceX / Flickr

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk made history in February when his Falcon Heavy rocket launched a red Tesla convertible into outer space. In the driver seat is a dummy astronaut dubbed “Starman” who’s now flying through space, orbiting the sun.

Pete Jelliffe / Creative Commons

The state’s latest budget crisis means tens of millions of dollars set aside to make homes and businesses more energy efficient will instead be pumped into the state’s general fund.

Jillian Ives

A day after a massive fire broke out at a Connecticut waste and recycling plant, the blaze has been declared under control.

Bert Kaufmann / Creative Commons

Tens of millions of dollars that were to be set aside to make homes and businesses more energy efficient will instead be pumped into the state’s general fund.

It’s a funding raid that’s been criticized as a “hidden tax” on utility bills.

Here’s what the changes mean for consumers -- and greenhouse gases.

The recent cold spell has spurred oil-fired power plants throughout New England into action. But the operator of the regional electricity grid says pollution control regulations could throttle supplies from those sources.

Over the last decade, relatively low-polluting natural gas has been New England’s dominant fuel for electricity generation. But in winter, demand for gas can skyrocket from consumers who need it to heat their homes, and that can limit supplies for electricity generation.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

An aging trash incinerator located on Hartford’s riverfront will continue to burn garbage in the coming years. But a new developer chosen by the state said it will work to drastically reduce the amount of waste incinerated at the state’s largest trash plant.

AGs Sue EPA To Enforce Smog Regulations

Dec 28, 2017

The attorneys general in eight Eastern seaboard states are suing the Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency over air pollution that blows in from upwind states.  

A contractor for a natural gas pipeline company improperly dumped thousands of gallons in Agawam, Massachusetts.

It's been almost six months since an EPA appeals board heard a challenge to the next step in cleaning up the Housatonic River. And there's still no decision.

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