Politics

Political news from WNPR

The next presidential primary battle has arrived in a state with one of the country's largest Asian populations.

The fate of one of President Obama's controversial executive actions on immigration goes before the Supreme Court on Monday. The action would grant temporary, quasi-legal status and work permits to as many as 4 million parents who entered the U.S. illegally prior to 2010. The president's order applies only to parents of children who are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents.

Tucker Ives / WNPR

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump tailored his stump speech for the economic problems facing the state of Connecticut. He spoke to roughly 6,000 to 7,000 people at the Hartford Convention Center Friday night. Those who made it inside were met by thousands of protesters when they left.

A Connecticut Superior Court judge has declined to dismiss a lawsuit against Remington Arms, the maker of the rifle used in the 2012 shootings at the Sandy Hook Elementary School that killed 20 children and 6 teachers.

If Bernie Sanders surprises pollsters and confounds expectations in the New York primary on Tuesday, April 19, his backers and staff will trumpet the effect of his ninth debate with rival Hillary Clinton on the night of April 14.

They will say the relentlessly aggressive strategy Sanders pursued in the latest CNN debate, with its steady stream of attacks on Clinton, provided the defining moment in a long campaign for a nomination that remains up for grabs.

Kuzma/iStock / Thinkstock

A Connecticut Superior Court judge has ruled that the lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used in the 2012 shootings at the Sandy Hook Elementary School can go forward. 

Heather Brandon / WNPR

In 2013, a public affairs firm made a strong accusation in court, claiming that a state-related agency rigged a public bid when it chose to do business with the firm of Tom Ritter -- a former Democratic House Speaker in the Connecticut legislature. Now, a state court judge has again weighed in, saying the antitrust claim doesn’t have merit. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

A one-time insurance executive who defrauded the city of Hartford, the state and others of over $2 million was sentenced to 78 months in federal prison Wednesday. 

Sara Jo / Creative Commons

Eleven jail systems around the country -- including in Connecticut -- will receive $11 million in grants to help revamp operations to eventually reduce prison inmate populations throughout the state.

Catie Talarski / WNPR

Two Connecticut Army veterans are in Washington D.C. on Wednesday as their all Puerto Rican unit, the 65th Infantry Regiment, known as the Borinqueneers, are awarded the Congressional Gold Medal -- the highest honor Congress can award to civilians. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon underscored the timeliness and relevance of the U.N. Global Colloquium of University Presidents in the face of the vast destruction of cultural treasures and explained their importance.

Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president, the first of Sanders' fellow members of the U.S. Senate to do so.

In a New York Times op-ed, Merkley wrote that Sanders is "boldly and fiercely addressing the biggest challenges facing our country." Merkley praised the Vermont senator for opposition to international trade deals, his push for renewable energy, his calls to crack down on big banks, and his fight to address campaign finance laws.

Heather Brandon and Mary Lou Cooke digital illustration / Chion Wolf photo / Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum photo / WNPR / Creative Commons

As a sitting governor running for re-election in 2014, Dannel Malloy gave himself a nickname on Where We Live.

"You don't have to love me," said Malloy. "I'm a porcupine." The public is being reminded of Malloy's prickly side as he moves forwards with state employee layoffs. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse discusses the jobs cuts and what impact they will have on the state's residents.

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

The first round of layoff notices have been given out to state workers as Governor Dannel Malloy works to confront looming deficits.

Gage Skidmore/Frank Plitt / Creative Commons

A new Quinnipiac University poll was released on Tuesday for the upcoming presidential primaries in New York State scheduled for April 19.

Politicians, take note: Don't eat on camera, don't wear funny looking hats, don't sing, don't rap ... and, generally speaking, don't try to be funny. You will regret it. You will especially regret it if your very lame joke could be interpreted as racially insensitive.

Three of the five candidates on both sides of the aisle hail from New York in some way or another, so which candidate truly has a home court advantage is questionable.

But, demographics might offer a clue.

Historical and current U.S. Census data suggest that New York's demographics are unusual compared with other states that have already voted this primary season. No doubt, New Yorkers have their own state of mind, but, a few demographic trends help us understand the electorate.

A few things to watch:

1. Urban

Wyoming is sometimes called the Equality State — it had the nation's first female governor and was the first territory to give women the right to vote. But that legacy isn't visible on the floor of the state Senate. Just one of the 30 state senators is a woman.

"I am the queen of the Senate. I have my own little tiara," jokes Bernadine Craft, a Democrat who represents the mining town of Rock Springs.

Campaign for Rocky2016

Donald Trump was considered untouchable on his way to winning the nomination to represent the Republican Party in the 2016 election -- until establishment forces let go an unrelenting assault on his candidacy.

Now there's talk of revolution at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this summer, where the votes of superdelegates, or party loyalists, get the last word on who moves forward. The Trump campaign is warning against it.

Malloy: More Than 1,000 State Workers To Lose Their Job

Apr 11, 2016

More than 1,000 state employees are expected to lose their jobs as part of Connecticut's efforts to address a $900 million budget deficit, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said.

Malloy told reporters the exact number of workers to be dismissed has not been determined, but it could easily approach 2,000.

Secretary of State John Kerry visited the Peace Memorial in Hiroshima on Monday, making him the highest-ranking U.S. official to visit the site since the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb there at the end of World War II.

Kerry didn't apologize for the U.S. attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, as some Japanese activists have pushed for. He did honor those who died in the bombings, NPR's Elise Hu reports.

On the visit, Kerry toured the peace museum and laid a wreath at the monument to the attack, The Associated Press reports.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Republican presidential nominee John Kasich made his first official campaign stop in Connecticut on Friday at the Martire Center at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield.

At a campaign event in Philadelphia on Thursday in support of his wife's presidential bid, Bill Clinton responded to protesters in a way that has since been described as "peak white mansplain."

Nearly five months after a "wanted" bulletin tied him to the Paris terrorist attacks, Mohamed Abrini has been arrested in Belgium. Public broadcaster RTBF also says Abrini may be the "man in the hat" wanted in connection to last month's bombings in Brussels.

Bernie Sanders will be taking a few days off the campaign trail to attend a Vatican conference about social, economic and environmental issues.

The day after a debate in New York next week, Sanders will travel to Rome for the event.

In an interview on MSNBC's Morning Joe, Sanders said he was "a big, big fan of the pope."

"He has played an unbelievable role, unbelievable role in injecting a moral consequence into the economy," Sanders said. "He's talking about the idolatry of money, the worship of money, the greed that's out there."

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin took office in January, and his honeymoon is officially over. The mayor is trying to figure out a way to balance the city’s budget. 

Trump Holds Rally On Long Island

Apr 7, 2016

Donald Trump was on Long Island Wednesday night to hold his first rally before New York State’s April 19th Primary.

The Republican frontrunner declared it's “great to be home” before an estimated 10-12,000 people who filled a movie sound stage at Grumman Studios. Trump shrugged off a defeat in Wisconsin a day earlier and instead, predicted victory in his delegate-rich home state.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders is attracting criticism from members of Connecticut's congressional delegation after comments he made about shielding the gun industry from legal liability. 

The race for the Democratic nomination had been fairly polite compared with the spouse-sparring and name-calling across the aisle, but it looks like those polite days are over.

Ahead of the New York primary (April 19), Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton are doubling down on jabs over who is more "qualified" to be president.

U.S. Cities Facing Issues Over Pension Packages

Apr 7, 2016
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Andy Uhler

A task force aimed at preventing Philadelphia from going bankrupt has urged the city’s mayor to figure out how to deal with its almost $6 billion pension deficit. Philadelphia hasn't been or isn't the only region in the country dealing with this issue, though. 

Detroit was the poster child of cities running out of money. In 2013, the city filed for bankruptcy after accumulating $18 billion of debt. The pension program was said to account for a sixth of that total.

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