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On Puerto Rico's southwestern corner, the sleepy seaside town of Guanica is where, nearly 120 years ago, the U.S. relationship with the island began during the Spanish-American War. The town's museum director, Francisco Rodriguez, takes visitors to the town's waterfront where the invasion began. In Spanish he says, "This is Guanica Bay, where the American troops commanded by General Nelson Miles landed on July 25, 1898." At the site, a stone marker engraved by the 3rd Battalion of the U.S. Army commemorates the invasion.

Mary Anne Williams

Homeowners whose foundations are crumbling because of faulty concrete pleaded with lawmakers Tuesday for help.

Treason!

Mar 1, 2017
David / Flickr

Of all the crimes defined by law, only one is mentioned in the U.S. Constitution: Treason! This distinction, however, was not meant to deter dissent, but rather to protect it. Knowing well how England had levied the charge against those whose voices they found subversive, our founders sought to ensure the citizens of their newly formed nation would always be free to disagree with the government.

President Trump is receiving plaudits for his first joint address to Congress.

The White House certainly thinks it went well — so much so, it was reported that the White House is holding its revised travel ban, in part, to bask in the glow of the positive reviews.

Snap polls after the speech showed that people who watched it largely liked it.

President Trump pushed the reset button after a rocky first month in office, delivering an on-message joint address to Congress that outlined his vision for America.

"I am here tonight to deliver a message of unity and strength, and it is a message deeply delivered from my heart," Trump said at the outset, declaring that "the torch of truth, liberty and justice ... is now in our hands. And we will use it to light up the world."

Screenshot / White House

For the first time since taking office, President Donald Trump speaks to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night. 

David Maiolo / Creative Commons

This hour, we dissect President Trump's joint address to Congress -- what he's themed "the renewal of the American spirit."

Connecticut Holding Three Special Elections Today

Feb 28, 2017

Control of Connecticut's Senate may be at stake in Tuesday's special elections. There's currently an even number of Republicans and Democrats, with two open seats.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Marine Michael Zacchea had a job to do in 2004: train and lead the first Iraqi Army battalion after the U.S. disbanded the country’s military post invasion.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

The New London public school system hopes to pass an emergency policy this week that will safeguard undocumented children on school campuses in the city. Meanwhile, hundreds of people turned out at a community forum organized by the school district Monday night. 

President Trump's joint address to Congress on Tuesday night is expected to strike an optimistic tone as he outlines how he plans to begin a "renewal of the American spirit" with his economic goals and priorities.

Alper Cugun / Creative Commons

Culture icon Frank Rich joins Colin to talk about the subtle, or not-so-subtle war for our culture, from Trump's promise to avoid the White House Correspondents' Dinner to last night's Academy Awards. 

Mrschimpf / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s special transportation fund could be insolvent within four years if lawmakers don’t take action to secure new revenues. That was the message from the governor’s budget team to members of the legislature’s transportation committee Friday. 

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy is facing blowback from the White House for his memo on immigration. That memo released this week suggested that police should not use local resources to enforce federal immigration laws. The issue came up at Thursday’s press briefing in Washington, D.C.

Tuesday night, President Trump will address a joint session of Congress for the first time. After a chaotic first month, it will be a chance for Trump to reset his relationship with voters, who currently give him historically-low approval ratings.

It will also be a chance for him to reassure congressional Republicans, whose view of the new administration runs the gamut from optimism to unease.

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