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Politics

Tony Bacewicz / C-HIT

Arnold Giammarco, the Army and National Guard veteran deported to Italy nearly five years ago, is back home in Connecticut with his wife and daughter.

Update at 4:05 p.m. ET

Sen. John McCain, diagnosed with a deadly form of brain cancer just five days ago, returned to applause on the Senate floor Tuesday, where he cast a crucial vote to move forward on repeal of the Affordable Care Act and urged his colleagues to regain their sense of bipartisan cooperation.

However, the longtime Arizona senator, two-time presidential candidate and perhaps America's most famous former prisoner of war, warned that he "will not vote for this bill as it is today," describing it as "a shell."

The highest court in Massachusetts ruled Monday that local law enforcement cannot keep people in custody solely at the request of federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The practice, often known as an "ICE detainer," enabled federal authorities to take a longer look at the immigration status of people whom they suspect might be in the country illegally, even if they were otherwise free to leave.

Michael Vadon / Creative Commons

Almost nine months after the 2016 election, there still isn’t one generally agreed-upon theory of what happened.

A Sunday night vigil for Nury Chavarria drew hundreds, including Mayors Harry Rilling of Norwalk and Toni Harp of New Haven, to Igelsia de Dios Pentecostal Church in New Haven. They came to support the Norwalk mother of four who is living in the church to avoid deportation.

Updated at 2:00 p.m. ET

"I did not collude, nor know of anyone else in the campaign who colluded, with any foreign government," President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner said in a statement prior to his closed-door meeting Monday before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Speaking to reporters at the White House after the appearance, he said that documents and records that he provided the committee "show that all of my actions are proper, and occurred in the normal course of events of a very unique campaign."

Throughout the Trump presidency, Democrats have had one glimmer of optimism looking ahead to 2018. Polls continue to show that the party is well ahead of Republicans on the "generic ballot" — the term for when pollsters ask voters which party they would like to win the House of Representatives in the next election, or which party's House candidate they would likely vote for.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Three members of Connecticut’s congressional delegation met on Friday with the Guatemalan mother of four who sought sanctuary from deportation in a New Haven church.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A Norwalk mother of four who was supposed to be deported last week has instead taken refuge in a New Haven church. 

Updated at 10:24 p.m. ET

The White House communications operation underwent a dramatic shake-up Friday. Sean Spicer resigned as press secretary after President Trump appointed Anthony Scaramucci, a wealthy New York financier, as his communications director. Appearing on camera before the White House press corps at a televised press briefing, Scaramucci then announced Sarah Sanders, Spicer's deputy, as the new press secretary.

In statements Friday night, Trump praised Scaramucci and Sanders.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy has released a follow-up to last year's report looking at traffic stop data and racial profiling in Connecticut.

The Affordable Care Act is not "exploding" or "imploding," as President Trump likes to claim. But Trump does hold several keys to sabotaging the insurance marketplaces, should he so choose — one of which his administration is reportedly weighing using.

Gov. Dannel Malloy has rallied behind a Norwalk mother who was supposed to be deported to Guatemala on Thursday. Malloy and one of Nury Chavarria’s four U.S.-born children spoke out Thursday night against immigration policies that break up families.

SBSTNC / Creative Commons

Chuck Collins is a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies. He's also an author, an editor, and a child of the so-called “one percent."

This hour, we sit down with Collins. We talk about his latest book and preview his upcoming appearance in Winsted, Connecticut. 

On a recent morning in Texas, Fort Worth police arrested a man who threatened to burn down his girlfriend's apartment. The officers also detained two Mexican nationals at the apartment complex because they suspected them of being in the country illegally.

Then police called ICE Fugitive Operations. Soon men with guns and dark ballistic vests swarmed the parking lot.

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