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Flickr Creative Commons, Sam Howzit

Until recently, I didn't understand the degree to which Connecticut jury selection process -- called the voir dire -- differs from those of other states.

State Senator Proposes Bill to Decriminalize Marijuana

Feb 22, 2011
JailBreak Photography

In his state budget address, Governor Dannel Malloy proposed changes to how Connecticut deals with drug offenders.  WNPR’s Jason Cunningham reports on one of four new proposed bills that tackle marijuana reform.  

“There are too, there are simply too many people also, who have been arrested for and jailed for minor, non-violent or drug offenses.”

While Governor Malloy didn’t directly address the issue of marijuana reform in his budget proposal, he did talk about "alternative forms of punishment" for those convicted of some minor crimes.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Hartford board of education is scheduled to meet Tuesday to pick a successor to Superintendent Steven Adamowski, who is leaving after this year.  But there's some concern in the community that the process was flawed.  The district’s spokesman has been advocating for one of the two candidates to take Adamowski’s place.

You might know the name Elizabeth Horton Sheff.  She's the Sheff in Sheff vs. O'Neill, the landmark school desegregation case in Hartford.

Photos: The White House/Chion Wolf

It’s a fresh edition of Politics, Burgers and Beer with Rich Hanley! PB&B regular, New York magazine’s John Heilemann, joins us to talk about President Obama’s response to the upheaval in Egypt, the proposed federal budget, and Governor Malloy's proposed state budget—plus conversation on all the newest news and developing developments in the world of politics.

Chion Wolf, WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy unveiled his new two year budget yesterday.  The $19.7 budget for 2012 seeks to close a $3.2 billion deficit through tax hikes, spending cuts, and 2 billion dollars in union concessions.  

Chion Wolf/WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy presented his plan to close the state’s $3.2 billion budget gap to a joint session of the state legislature today. 

Budget Day

Feb 16, 2011
Chion Wolf, WNPR

Budget day at the Connecticut capitol used to be like Christmas morning…you were never sure what you’d be getting.

Sure, like with Santa Claus you had a pretty good idea.  I mean you’d been dropping hints for months.  But, the final budget presented by the governor always included a hint of surprise.

Chion Wolf Photo

Chion Wolf/WNPR

Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra took over last summer after Eddie Perez was found guilty of corruption and resigned his office. Now Segarra is running for mayor, and he says Perez’s political allies are targeting him. Segarra appeared on WNPR’s Where We Live with John Dankosky. He suggested that efforts by at least one of his opponents, State Representative Kelvin Roldan, have the feel of Perez politics.

The Mayor of Hartford

Feb 10, 2011
Chion Wolf

Hartford’s new mayor is dealing with piles of snow, a hole in the budget, and the everyday problems of running a city. 

Pedro Segarra took over when Eddie Perez stepped down amidst corruption charges.  At the time, he said he wasn’t planning to run for Mayor again. 

But now he is and he’s facing challengers for that job, already.

He’s also looking at a budget deficit of $40 million dollars next year.  Yesterday he got some good news from Governor Malloy about education grants from the state.  But there’s still a long way to go to fill the budget hole.

Abeeeer photo via Flickr Creative Commons

It started with a flub by U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal.  It wasn't a big deal. As one of his spokespeple suggested, even the substitution of the word "era" for "days" would have helped his cause quite a bit. Most other politicians would not have been called on this, but, for Blumenthal, it fits kind of a narrative some people have about him.

The 2000 election illustrated the weirdness of our presidential voting system in several different dimensions. 

Front Street in Court

Feb 8, 2011
Jeff Cohen/WNPR

The retail development known as Front Street in Hartford is finally built and looking for tenants.  But the project took years to materialize, and now it's in court.

Front Street is a publicly-subsidized development that was geared to attract area people to downtown Hartford and the adjacent Connecticut Convention Center.  Here’s how George Royster puts it. He's an attorney for the state:

“Because people coming to Hartford with no place to go would not be likely to return to the convention center or the hotel if they had no entertainment or retail or places to eat.”

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