WNPR

Politics

hpebley3, Flickr Creative Commons

Here are links to a few of the topics discussed on today's episode of The Nose:

Cloe Poisson / Courtesy of The Hartford Courant

Former Bridgeport Mayor Joseph Ganim has not announced whether he’ll jump into the mayoral race this year, but a poll finds that if he does, it could change the landscape of the election.

Joe Ganim was released from prison one year ago after serving six years for a massive municipal corruption scandal. The former Bridgeport mayor was convicted on 16 counts, including steering city contracts in return for hundreds of thousands of dollars in kickbacks.

The U.S Department of Labor says nearly 12 percent of veterans who've served since 9-11 were unemployed last year. Twenty-five percent of them have service-related disabilities. The number of unemployed is expected to grow now that more veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan are returning to a country trying to recover from the recession.  A small program by Congress aims to help veterans get back into the workforce. 

Chion Wolf, WNPR

Deficit cutting negotiations with President Obama and Congressional leaders continued yesterday with no apparent progress.  Time is running short to raise the government's debt limit.  We talk to Congressman John Larson about the impasse.

Photo by WNPR's Chion Wolf

A deadline looms large for Congress to reach a budget deal that includes  raising the U.S borrowing limit. If leadership fails to do so by August 2, the country could default on its debt for the first time ever.  WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports on the perspective of 4th district Congressman Jim Himes.

Copyright 2017 WNPR News. To see more, visit WNPR News.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

The city of Dallas has been testing these changes and Jeff Cohen from member station WNPR has this report.

via WikiMedia Commons

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy took a small step Wednesday toward renewed talks about concessions with unionized state employees when he said he likely would send an aide to inquire how labor leaders hope to revise their contract amendment ratification rules.

But the governor also warned that without clear direction first from labor about how a difficult ratification process might be reformed, there is little for the two sides to talk about. Nearly 60 percent of participating union members voted in favor of concessions last month, but ratification still failed.

Layoffs Loom After Conn. Workers' 'No' Vote

Jul 2, 2011

Transcript

JEFF COHEN: And I'm Jeff Cohen in Hartford, where the budget season began with what seemed like a safe bet. Democratic Governor Dannel Malloy said he and labor leaders would find a way to save $2 billion over two years, and the Democratic legislature said okay. Eventually, the governor and the state's unions came to an agreement that scaled back some benefits and included a four-year pledge of no layoffs.

Chion Wolf

At the end of a slightly confusing night, the state legislature gave Gov. Dannel P. Malloy some of the added emergency budget-cutting authority he wanted but made him unhappy by spurning his request to cut aid to cities and towns. 

Where We Live: Roundtable On Shared Sacrifice

Jul 1, 2011
Chion Wolf

Connecticut’s special legislative session ended last night with a budget deal.  But, believe it or not - this still might not be over.

Governor Dannel Malloy and state lawmakers agreed on a package to plug the last $1.6 billion dollar hole in the state budget with up to 6500 layoffs in the state workforce.  

It’s something neither Malloy, nor the Democratically controlled legislature...nor union leadership wanted to see happen.  But the union vote to reject a concessions package has seemingly sealed the deal.

Chion Wolf

OK, I know this might not be as easy and fun as yesterday's show on comic books, but if the current state budget were a comic book, it would be about a dystopian future. (And present for that matter ...)

The state constitution requires that the budget be balanced by Friday. It isn't. The plan for doing that included significant givebacks by the state employees. They wouldn't do it.

Chion Wolf

Hartford is at a time of transition. Recovering from corruption, transforming its education planning for the future.

Today, Where We Live teams up with The Hartford Public Library for “The Year Ahead: A Conversation with Hartford’s State Legislators.” 

We'll be talking with members of the state congressional delegation from the city. They'll share their thoughts about the state of Hartford, and what lawmakers are doing to solve some of the city’s problems - from violence, to education scores, to literacy rates.

Pages