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The Commandant of the Coast Guard has spoken out in defense of transgender service members in the wake of President Donald Trump’s announcement that he would not allow transgender people to serve. 

Maudib/iStock / Thinkstock

Can you believe President Trump’s transgender military ban "tweetstorm" was one week ago today? That attempt at tweets-as-policy-change didn’t quite work, and was soon overshadowed by John McCain’s rogue “thumbs down” on the critical GOP health care vote.  And as soon as we got used to the foul-mouthed Anthony Scaramucci, he’s out. 

Senate Republicans don't appear to be too worried about President Trump's latest round of threats.

The Senate has easily confirmed Christopher Wray to be the next FBI director, a position he assumes after former Director James Comey was ousted by President Trump in May.

The 50-year-old former Justice Department lawyer was approved by a 92-5 vote.

Wray was Trump's choice to lead the FBI after he decided to fire Comey — a controversial decision that led to the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller to take over the bureau's investigation into Russian interference in last year's elections and possible collusion between top aides to the Trump campaign and Russia.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Connecticut Senate has given final legislative approval to a state employee concession deal, aimed at reducing the projected $5 billion state budget deficit by $1.5 billion over the next two years. 

The Fox News Channel and a wealthy supporter of President Trump worked in concert under the watchful eye of the White House to concoct a story about the death of a young Democratic National Committee aide, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday.

The explosive claim is part of a lawsuit filed against Fox News by Rod Wheeler, a longtime paid commentator for the news network. The suit was obtained exclusively by NPR.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Anthony Scaramucci is leaving his position as White House communications director — less than two weeks after being named for the job.

Scaramucci's departure followed the Monday-morning swearing in of the new White House chief of staff, retired Gen. John F. Kelly. Scaramucci had negotiated an unusual deal to report directly to the president rather than the chief of staff (Reince Priebus at the time).

Petty Officer 2nd Class Cory J. Mendenhall / US Coast Guard Academy

Last week, the "skinny" repeal of the Affordable Care Act died a buzzer-beating (and perhaps temporary) death on the Senate floor. The Ringer's Bryan Curtis notes that, "Minus the life-and-death part, it had the feel of an unexpectedly competitive Pac-12 football game that the country noticed in installments."

Updated at 3:36 p.m. ET

President Trump swore in his new chief of staff Monday morning, former Homeland Security Secretary and retired Marine Gen. John Kelly, telling reporters he has no doubt Kelly will do a "spectacular job" in his new role.

Kelly takes over from Reince Priebus, former chairman of the Republican National Committee, who left the position after a little over six months, unable to bring order to a chaotic and at times fractious West Wing.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hate drives people to do unspeakable things but how often do these stories end in forgiveness and friendship?

This hour, Ted Hakey Jr. and Zahir Mannan join us. The two men met after Hakey shot his rifle into Mannan’s place of worship — the Ahmaddiya Baitul Amman Mosque in Meriden in 2015.

In the thick of the presidential race last summer — Donald Trump was attacking Hillary Clinton over Benghazi; Clinton was widening her lead in the polls — FBI agents uncovered something odd.

On June 28, federal cyber experts noticed that the network credentials of an Arizona county elections worker had been posted on a site frequented by suspected Russian hackers. The password and username discovered by the FBI could let someone access the state's voter registration system.

Updated at 8:25 p.m. ET

North Korea said early Saturday that its intercontinental ballistic missile test on Friday showed its program could hit the United States, according to a statement reported by The Associated Press and Reuters.

The U.S. Department of Defense says the missile, which launched just before midnight local time, traveled roughly 620 miles — from the country's northern province of Jagang to the Sea of Japan, where it finally splashed into the waters off Japan's west coast.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A New Fairfield man ordered to be deported to his native Guatemala says he could be at risk of violence or kidnapping if he returns. Joel Colindres came to the United States illegally in 2004. He married a U.S. citizen in 2010 and they have two young children.

Updated 9:40 p.m. ET

Stung by new American sanctions, Russia's Foreign Ministry says the U.S. must downsize its diplomatic and technical staff in Moscow and other cities. The ministry is also suspending the U.S. Embassy's use of two sites — a storage facility and a dacha on an island in the Moscow River.

President Trump said Friday night he would sign the sanctions legislation because Congress was responsive to his input on the bill.

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