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Refugee resettlement organizations crossed their fingers after this week's election. President-elect Trump has threatened to ban refugees, particularly Muslims. Meanwhile Connecticut uses a unique model that places refugees in individual communities. They would like the model to continue and even grow. The town of Wilton is a good place to see it in action.

Less than a week after his election, Donald Trump has begun to fill out the team he plans to bring with him to the White House. The president-elect announced Sunday that he has selected Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus to serve as chief of staff in his incoming administration.

In the same announcement, Priebus' appointment shared top billing with the news that Trump campaign CEO Stephen K. Bannon will serve as chief strategist and senior counselor to the president.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

He'll build a border wall and he'll deport millions of people who are in the U.S. illegally, President-elect Donald Trump says, promising to keep his campaign pledges on immigration in his first prolonged interview since winning the White House.

Donald Trump has proposed a very detailed tax plan — but his statements on the campaign trail don't always match what his proposal would really do.

For instance, at a rally in Scranton, Pa., Trump promised to "massively cut taxes for the middle class, the forgotten people, the forgotten men and women of this country, who built our country." During a town hall meeting on NBC's Today show, he said he believes in raising taxes on the wealthy.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Thousands took to the streets this week in cities across the nation to protest against President-elect Donald Trump. On Thursday, more than 300 people marched through the streets of downtown New Haven in a demonstration organized by immigrant rights group Unidad Latina en Acción. 

Brett Levin / Creative Commons

Voters in Massachusetts approved the recreational use of marijuana starting in 2018. It's a measure some Connecticut legislators have pushed for in the past without success. But now proponents think the tide might be changing in Connecticut. 

The election just ended and the new president doesn't even take office until Jan. 20. But the transition planning starts now.

Who's going to be President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of state? His chief of staff? His education secretary? Now that the news of Trump's election has settled, speculation over how the president-elect will fill out his administration has consumed Washington.

Keeping in mind the truism that nobody who knows is talking, and those who are talking don't really know, here are some of the names being floated, leaked and speculated about.

It was perhaps the unthinkable: President Obama meeting with his successor at the White House in the first step to carry out the peaceful transition of power in the American republic — and that successor is Donald Trump.

But that's exactly what happened Thursday morning in what amounts to one of the more surreal moments in American political history.

Ninian Reid / Creative Commons

From businessman to president-elect -- it was a victory that surprised many. This hour: the rise of Republican Donald Trump. We recap Tuesday’s election results and we also hear from you.

Did you vote? What does a Trump presidency mean to you, your friends, and your family? 

Donald Trump's election early Wednesday as president — utterly unprecedented, utterly unexpected — caught the media flat-footed. The distance between the nation's political press corps and its people has never seemed so stark. The pundits swung and missed. The polls failed. The predictive surveys of polls, the Upshots and FiveThirtyEights, et al. with their percentage certainties, jerked violently in the precise opposite direction of their predictions as election night progressed.

At the end of October, Donald Trump spoke in Gettysburg, Pa., and released a plan for his first 100 days in office.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

About 52 percent of Connecticut voters cast their vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton on Tuesday. Now all voters are contemplating the next four years under President-elect Donald Trump.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut’s Democratic governor will have to reckon with a new legislative landscape when the General Assembly reconvenes in January. The state Senate is now split evenly between Republicans and Democrats, and the GOP also picked up eight seats in the House, leaving Democrats with a slim, seven-seat majority. 

Michael Vadon/flickr creative commons

The one thing we knew for sure was that by the time we got to today, yesterday would be over.

And it is.

And we have a new President-elect.

TIM KAINE:

Thank you so much. Please, please have a seat. My wife Anne and I are so proud of Hillary Clinton. I'm proud of Hillary Clinton because she has been and is a great history maker in everything she has done - as a civil rights lawyer, and First Lady of Arkansas, and First Lady of this country, and senator, and Secretary of State. She has made history. In a nation that is good at so many things but that has made it uniquely difficult for a woman to be elected to federal office.

Hillary Clinton conceded the White House race to President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday morning, saying she hoped "he will be a successful president for all Americans."

"This is not the outcome we wanted or worked so hard for. I'm sorry we didn't win this election for the values we share and the vision we hold for our country," the Democratic nominee told supporters crowded into a small, nondescript ballroom at the New Yorker Hotel in Midtown Manhattan.

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

President-elect Trump. Sounds weird, doesn’t it.

When Donald Trump came down the escalator in June of 2015 in the tower he named for himself in Manhattan, few of us who do politics for a living took his off-the-cuff announcement for president seriously.

But the past 17 months have been a lesson to all of us who flattered ourselves — as campaign pros, polling pros and media pros — that we knew more about politics than he did.

What have we learned? That Trump was being taken very seriously, indeed, by the people who ultimately mattered: voters.

Donald Trump has been elected the 45th president of the United States, the capstone of a tumultuous and divisive campaign that won over white voters with the promise to "Make America Great Again."

Trump crossed the 270 electoral vote threshold at 2:31 a.m. ET with a victory in Wisconsin, according to Associated Press projections.

Connecticut officials are reporting a high election day turnout. 

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill says she expects turnout to top 75 percent, which would be higher than the 2012 election. 

Governor Dannel Malloy urged voters to come out when and his wife cast their ballots in Hartford today.

He says, "This has been a hard fought contest, got nasty at times, got strange and bizarre at times. There were ups and downs. But you know, listen, this has played itself out over a two year period of time. Let's get this thing done. Let's go out and vote."

Democrat Hillary Clinton is projected to win Connecticut in a tight race between her and Republican nominee Donald Trump.

Heather Brandon / WNPR

After months of non-stop coverage and politicking, voters got the final say on Tuesday to cap off the 2016 election. WNPR went to several cities and towns in Connecticut to talk with them on the final day of a long campaign season. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Voters started lining up before polls opened on Tuesday at 6:00 am in Connecticut. Residents are choosing their state lawmakers, congressional delegation, a United States senator -- and which presidential candidate will receive the state's seven electoral college votes.

Some voters waited more than two hours at Wilbur Cross High School in New Haven Tuesday morning. That’s because it’s a polling location for both Ward 9 and Ward 10.

Brad Greenlee / Creative Commons

We're all a little tired of this election. I vacillate between excitement, fear, anger, fatigue - sometimes all in the same hour. What will become of the country after this election?Will we accept the results? Will there be 'revolution?' Will Congress come together to legislate in the best interests of the country? 

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