Political news from WNPR

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

One of the suicide bombers who struck Paris on Friday has been identified as a Syrian who passed through Greece as an asylum-seeker this year and registered with European authorities.

That fact has spurred a strong reaction from many politicians here in the United States over the resettlement of Syrian refugees, with swift opposition from many Republican governors, and one Democrat, to further resettlement of Syrian refugees in their states.

A crowd gathered on Boston Common early Sunday afternoon to express their support of and solidarity with the people of France following Friday’s deadly attacks in Paris.

President Barack Obama held a press conference from a global summit in Turkey on Monday. He said reducing the territory controlled by the Islamic State group, or ISIS, in Iraq and Syria will reduce the flow of fighters and lessen the threat it poses. Watch his address and press conference below.

Friday's attacks in Paris have cast a shadow over the Group of 20 summit, which opened Sunday in Antalya, in southern Turkey. Leaders of 20 major economies agreed to step up the battle against ISIS and to ease the wider conflict in Syria.

The second Democratic debate was a subdued affair, where even the slights felt polite. Sanders and O'Malley attacked Clinton's — and by extension the Obama administration's — record on foreign policy but when it came time to talk about how to fight the Islamic State, the separation felt a matter of semantics. "This cannot be an American fight, although American leadership is essential," said Clinton. O'Malley said he disagreed: "This is America's fight, but not America's alone." Sanders pivoted quickly from foreign policy to the economy.

For the first 30 minutes of the Democratic debate, the attacks in Paris loomed large, starting with a moment of silence and continuing with the opening statements.

The candidates were asked to address the attacks and what they would do in their opening statements, and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spent her entire opening statement talking about them.

In 2008, one voting bloc in particular made a huge difference in the presidential election: young people. Young voters were a crucial part of the coalition that propelled President Obama to victory then.

But what about now? What issues matter to young voters this time around — and which candidates are doing the best job so far of speaking to those concerns?

Updated at 1:22 a.m. ET

In the wake of controversy of any kind, even terrorist attacks, U.S. politics is never far behind. The American political response — from President Obama to the candidates vying to replace him — in the hours following the Paris attacks has been unsurprisingly split along party lines.

What is interesting, however, is that Democrats, who are set to debate Saturday night, have kept their responses generally to thoughts and prayers — with little in the way of policy prescriptions.

Mark M. Murray / The Springfield Republican

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno has relieved Sal Circosta of his seat on the city’s Community Police Hearing Board, which reviews complaints against police officers. Circosta was the mayor’s challenger in this last election.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

One of the great promises of Hartford’s $56 million, city-funded minor league baseball stadium was that it would bring good jobs to minority contractors and workers. According to the developers, it has. They say they will meet or exceed its targets for minority hiring.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy is offering a long list of spending items that lawmakers can cut to help balance the state budget.

Will Clayton / Creative Commons

This hour, we hear three stories that all converge around the topic of China. 


The Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation has received a federal grant of $106,000 to place two German Shepherd guide dogs with disabled service members and veterans.

Tony Webster / Creative Commons

In the early 2000s, a unit of Boston Globe reporters known as the “Spotlight" team uncovered child sex abuse in one of Boston’s most powerful institutions: the Catholic Church. 

Lawrence OP / Flickr

According to Yale Philosophy Professor Shelly Kagan, many of today's political issues are actually philosophical ones. Kagan says no one ever asks philosophers to weigh in.

Wouldn't a deeper understanding of the day's news -- including why people think what they think and hold the positions they hold -- be beneficial?

One reason for the lack of philosophical commentary in the media might be the relatively short attention spans many Americans have for absorbing information. Who has time for philosophy? And are political debates real outlets for philosophical argument?

WA State Dept. of Transportation flickr.com/photos/wsdot/6006862108

Connecticut U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal has vowed to fix some glaring safety issues in the $325 billion highway funding bill which passed in the House of Representatives last week. 

The measure would pay for six years’ worth of transportation infrastructure projects.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy has rolled out more support for his fresh look at the Connecticut state pensions system, but he’s still getting pushback from some of the state's constitutional officers.

DonkeyHotey / Creative Commons

There was one moment in Tuesday's Republican presidential debate that reminded us of all those other unwieldy, freewheeling and circus-like debates that came before: Rand Paul getting cut off by Carly Fiorina, and then Donald Trump drawing boos for being Trump. For the most part, though, last night’s debate was much more orderly. It was so orderly that rarely did the candidates, who had complained so loudly about previous moderators, get challenged on any of their statements.

The fourth debate among the leading Republican candidates for president filled the historic Milwaukee Theatre with cheers, laughter and occasional boos, but it probably did not alter the dynamics among the eight featured contestants.

No one seemed to stumble or scintillate so notably as to change the pecking order with the first voting, now fewer than a dozen weeks away in the Iowa precinct caucuses.

Leyda Quast / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy addressed veterans, federal, state and local officials Monday at the dedication of the state's first memorial honoring those in Connecticut who have served the nation.

Immigration is shaping up to be one of the most contentious and emotional topics in the 2016 presidential race. It's also one on which candidates' views aren't yet fully formed.


Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno is booting the three historical commission members who previously opposed MGM’s design plans. The mayor’s office denies there’s a connection.

MarineCorps NewYork / Creative Commons

Wednesday is November 11, a date originally designated by President Woodrow Wilson as Armistice Day to mark the end of World War I. After World War II, however, it was renamed Veterans Day to honor all Americans who have served. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Following a recount, officials in Clinton have determined the outcome of the coastal Connecticut town's first selectman vote by the slimmest of possible margins.

Connecticut Local Election Turnout Was 33 Percent

Nov 7, 2015

Turnout for municipal elections in Connecticut continues to be low, with 32.7 percent of registered voters going to the polls earlier this week.

Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Creative Commons

As state leaders meet to try to close a $370 million budget shortfall, advocates for transportation funding say they still believe a lockbox is essential to revamping the state’s infrastructure.

Peter Stevens / Creative Commons

U.S. Senator Chris Murphy is condemning a radio ad that supports Republican presidential candidate Senator Ted Cruz.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Connecticut Hospital Association launched a new digital campaign this week decrying Governor Dannel Malloy's proposed cuts to hospitals.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The budget talks now have a number. Legislative leaders and Governor Dannel Malloy have agreed -- roughly -- on the size of Connecticut budget hole. 


Bridgeport’s business community is absorbing the news that Joe Ganim will soon be back in the mayor’s office. It's a city that’s always needed all hands on deck to stimulate economic development, attract businesses, and boost employment.