Politics

Political news from WNPR

Hillary Clinton walked a delicate line on trade as she held her first official press conference of her campaign on Monday.

Instead of staking out a clear position on whether she supports the current Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal and fast-track authority for the president, the Democratic presidential candidate instead dismissed the current stalemate in Congress as a "process issue."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Malloy is asking lawmakers to roll back $223.7 million in tax hikes to businesses in the new two-year budget. Those tax increases prompted some major employers to discuss possibly moving out of the state. Malloy said his plan addresses their concerns.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Since taking office, Sen. Chris Murphy has been vocal on U.S. foreign policy both in the Ukraine/Russia conflict, and in the Middle East. In a recent op-ed for Foreign Affairs, he joined other senators to advocate for new foreign policy principles.

Major decisions are expected this month, as the U.S. Supreme Court works its way through several cases still pending before it closes out its calendar for the 2014-2015 term.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

The race to be the next Hartford mayor is underway. And with just over a month to go until the city's Democratic leaders endorse their candidate, Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra defended his record at a debate Thursday night.

orudorumagi11 / Creative Commons

The state legislature left some work to do after the regular session ended, but it did change the way the car tax is applied across the state. 

Speaking on WNPR's Where We Live, panelists broke down the way the state budget would affect the tax and how complex it appears to be.

The 2016 presidential cycle is a first for women. It’s the first time two women are simultaneously vying for the White House as the nominee of each of the two major parties, political research analysts say.

But for Republican presidential hopeful Carly Fiorina, gender-identity politics is complicated.

Now that Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has made it very clear that she won't be a candidate for president in 2016, some of the Democratic candidates in the race are actively seeking the backing of Warren's supporters.

Bernie Sanders is making a major effort to bring them over to his presidential campaign.

C-Span

Senator Chris Murphy is pushing for congressional action to ban the deployment of U.S. ground troops to Iraq and Syria. Murphy spoke about his amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act on the Senate floor on Wednesday.

Daniel Schwen / Creative Commons

The state of Indiana is suggesting three major Connecticut employers that openly criticized planned tax increases consider moving to the Hoosier State. 

Exploring European Conservatism

Jun 10, 2015
Bobby Hidy, Creative Commons

Just listen to Republican candidates for president of the U.S., and you have a pretty good idea of what modern, American conservatism is all about: lower taxes, gun rights, and smaller government, to name a few notions.

But in Europe, where political, social, and economic climates are much different, what does the political right look like? 

The chairman of the Massachusetts Gaming Commission confirms he is under investigation by state ethics officials.

Commission Chairman Stephen Crosby told the Boston Globe he is cooperating with the investigation and has done nothing wrong.

The newspaper said the state ethics commission received a sworn statement alleging Crosby participated in the process to award a casino license in the greater Boston area despite publicly recusing himself because of personal ties with a casino landowner.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut House Speaker Brendan Sharkey called for new leadership at Quinnipiac University this week, citing problems caused by students living in residential neighborhoods.

The Connecticut Mirror

Connecticut’s legislative session ended with a soft thud last week. There wasn’t quite the mad rush we're used to seeing as the clock ticked down. That means, lawmakers will have to return to the capitol for a special session. This hour on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we recap the long session and talk taxes, as business groups and even other states are jumping in with comments on the state's new tax plans.

Vermont will have a new governor in 2017.

Gov. Peter Shumlin announced Monday afternoon that he won’t seek a fourth term in office. The Democrat says he’ll leave the state in far better shape than he found it. But his Republican critics argue otherwise, and the open seat for governor has made for an early start to the 2016 campaign. 

It was an ugly scene. A fight broke out at a pool party in a McKinney, Texas, subdivision on Friday, allegedly after a white resident told a group of black teenagers to "go back to their Section 8 housing." Local cops show up in force. At some point, a bystander pulls out his cellphone and begins videotaping.

John Phelan / Creative Commons

The chairman of the Connecticut Republican Party says the state GOP plans to raise and spend $500,000 to try and win control of the General Assembly.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down a law that allowed Americans who were born in Jerusalem to list Israel as their birthplace on their passports.

In a 6-3 ruling, the court said that the law, passed by Congress in 2002, interferes with the president's constitutional right to recognize foreign nations. The U.S. State Department has a long-standing policy not to recognize any nation's authority over Jerusalem until Israelis and Palestinians resolve its status.

The case is seen as an important separation-of-powers ruling.

The second and last day of the G-7 summit in Germany today will focus on climate change and terrorism.

The BBC reports:

"Chancellor Angela Merkel wants the group to reach an agreement on limiting global temperature rises. She also wants G-7 members to contribute to a fund for poor countries suffering the worst effects of climate change.

"There will also be talks on the threat from radical extremism with the leaders of Nigeria, Tunisia and Iraq.

WFSB

Just over a week ago, Gov. Dannel Malloy told MSNBC he was "not ready yet," to endorse a presidential candidate, citing the on-going Connecticut legislative session. But now he's ready to publicly endorse Hillary Clinton for president.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Republican Presidential hopeful Marco Rubio drew a crowd of more than 800 people inside the Crowne Plaza in Stamford, and some protestors outside. Rubio was the keynote speaker at the 37th Prescott Bush Awards Dinner. The event raised nearly $200,000 for the Connecticut Republican party.

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET

Rick Perry, the former governor of Texas and 2012 Republican candidate for president, formally announced a second bid for the White House.

At a rally in Addison, Texas, this afternoon, Perry told a group of supporters: "Today I am announcing that I'm running for the presidency of the United States of America."

He decried that "weakness at home has led to weakness abroad" and that "Our economy is barely growing."

CT-N

The Connecticut Republican leadership recapped the 2015 legislative session at the State Capitol on Thursday. House Republican Leader Themis Klarides urged the governor to veto the budget if it wasn't the plan he wanted.

CT-N

Governor Dannel Malloy touted accomplishments related to property tax reform and investments in transportation during a press conference on Thursday at the State Capitol, while reporters questioned him repeatedly on his earlier promise not to raise taxes. 

CT-N

State Senate Democrats are recapping the 2015 legislative session during a press conference in Senate President Martin Looney's office.

David Wilson / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Senate voted on Wednesday night in favor of a two-year, $40.3 billion Democratic budget. The vote came about a half-hour before the midnight adjournment on Wednesday. 

Connecticut Senate Backs Cutting Penalties for Drugs

Jun 3, 2015
Heath Alseike / Creative Commons

The state Senate has approved legislation that would make drug possession a misdemeanor for the first two offenses and establishes other changes in criminal justice policy.

The legislation approved on a 22 to 14 vote early Wednesday requires third and subsequent convictions to be punishable as felonies.

Keith Allison / Creative Commons

Connecticut lawmakers have voted to reverse a state Supreme Court ruling -- which had been criticized by the media -- that said police are only obligated to release basic information about arrests to the public while prosecutions are pending.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Connecticut's House of Representatives passed a $40 billion state budget after Democratic leaders worked through the night to secure enough votes.

The bill, which needed 72 votes, was approved Wednesday morning 73 to 70. It now heads to the Senate, which by law must act on the package by midnight when the General Assembly is scheduled to adjourn for the summer.

Lisa Jacobs / Creative Commons

The clock is ticking down on the end of the regular legislative session. It’s that time of the year when reporters and capitol observers try to make sense of what’s happening: what legislation gets passed, what gets killed, and what gets moved to the "budget implementer."

Pages