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John Nichols, author of Horsemen of the Trumpocalypse: A Field Guide to The Most Dangerous People in America believes Donald Trump has put together the most dangerous cabinet in history. He says Trump has filled it with partisan ideologues or people with no government experience and/or unqualified to do the job of their department. 

The Weinstein Company

Taylor Sheridan's "Wind River" has been called "a thrilling, violent finale to the 'Hell or High Water' and 'Sicario' trilogy" (Sheridan wrote the first two entries and writes and directs this newest one). "River," starring Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen, is a character-driven murder mystery, more literary drama than genre thriller. The Nose renders its critique.

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Sunday’s nuclear test out of Pyongyang, North Korea triggered a high-profile response from U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley.

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Connecticut has become overconfident that money would always be found to pay the bills. For the first time, the state is realizing we can't pay the bills for pensions and retirement and infrastructure that we've put off for decades to spend on other things. 

Lawmakers have less than two weeks of legislative days to head off a government shutdown, raise the nation's borrowing limit and provide financial assistance in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Congress is back after a monthlong break, although it may not have seemed like Washington was on vacation based on the pace of political news in August.

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As the Department of Homeland Security collects plans for the US-Mexico border, the conversation is turning more towards how border walls don't work in keeping people out.

This hour, we talk about what walls are effective in dividing: our psyches, our environments, and the populations around them.

Gage Skidmore, Peoria Arizona / Wikimedia Commons

President Trump pardoned former Maricopa County sheriff Joe Arpaio Friday. Arpaio was not going to jail for his documented brutality against immigrants, failure to investigate complaints of sexual assault, or his  arrest of journalists critical of his policies. He was going to jail for repeated contempt of a judicial order to stop illegally detaining immigrants. Arpaio and our president seem to both hold contempt for the laws they were elected to uphold. 

President Trump has pardoned controversial former Sheriff Joe Arpaio for a misdemeanor criminal contempt conviction.

A statement issued by the White House Friday night said, "Today, President Donald J. Trump granted a Presidential pardon to Joe Arpaio, former Sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona."

Known as "America's Toughest Sheriff," Arpaio gained a reputation for his harsh — his critics would say cruel — treatment of immigrants in the country illegally.

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How do you confront hate?

This hour, we dive into this resurgent — and unfortunate — reality. Should we tolerate hate? Or should we be intolerant? Do we fight hate with more hatred, or something else? We talk about all this, along with the recent incidents in Charlottesville and Boston.

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Cultural leaders are beating a hasty retreat from President Trump. 

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Drug overdose deaths in Connecticut have surpassed the national average for several years now.

This hour, we talk with a former heroin addict about how he got into recovery — and his advice for others struggling with addiction. 

Connecticut U.S. Senator Chris Murphy completed a five-day, 100-mile walk across the state in Danbury on Thursday. The Democrat says most people along the walk expressed concerns about President Donald Trump’s response to Charlottesville, Va.

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The American Psychological Association says the 2016 presidential election was a major source of stress for a majority of Americans regardless of political affiliation. 

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Hundreds of followers of the white nationalist movement came to Charlottesville over the weekend to protest the planned removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee. The City Council voted to remove it from a park whose name they changed from Lee Park to Emancipation Park.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Coming up: We find out how researchers are working to preserve the world's most endangered languages -- including a look at locally-based efforts to expand fluency of the Mohegan language.

But first: reaction to the weekend’s news out of Charlottesville.

We check in with former Virginia residents and we also hear from you.

How do you interpret this latest incident of racism and violence? Do you worry that something similar could happen here in Connecticut? 

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