WNPR

politicians

Updated on Friday at 12:40 a.m. ET

Roy Moore, the Republican nominee for the open Senate seat in Alabama, is facing an accusation from a woman who says that he initiated sexual contact when she was 14 years old and he was a 32-year-old assistant district attorney.

Republicans had watched Donald Trump unleash powerful forces inside their party for more than a year. On Election Day last year, the question for many inside the GOP was how to deal with those forces once Trump had lost.

Few had figured out what it would mean for the party if he won.

Democrats were planning. There were lists of cabinet secretaries and the challenge of breaking the deadlock that set in between President Obama and the GOP Congress once President Hillary Clinton was in office.

Few had figured out what it would mean for the party if she lost.

Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

On the first anniversary of President Trump’s election, NPR is looking back at his victory speech. NPR reporters across the newsroom have annotated his election night remarks, providing context and analysis to his policy promises and noting who among the people he thanked are still in the inner circle a year later.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Grab a pen and a book of stamps; it's time to talk about... taxes. Last week, the GOP unveiled a new, postcard-friendly measure -- "The The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act."

What exactly is in the tax overhaul bill and what does it mean for Connecticut? 

NASA/Crew of STS-129

The International Space Station is the most expensive thing ever built. It's about the size of a football field, it weighs a million pounds, and it's up there flying around in the sky at 17,000 mph, but... we don't really ever hear much about it, do we?

Well, so, this hour we hear about it.

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

Paul Manafort and his former business associate Rick Gates surrendered Monday morning to special counsel Robert Mueller after he asked them to do so. The New York Times reports the charges are for money laundering, tax and foreign lobbying. 

The indictments come after CNN reported Friday night that a federal grand jury had approved the first charges in the Russia investigation led by special counsel and former FBI director, Robert Mueller. 

Former Vice President Al Gore says Americans are changing their ideas about climate change.

Fronteiras do Pensamento / flickr creative commons

Richard Dawkins is probably the best-known ethologist and evolutionary biologist in the world. And he's maybe the best-known atheist and secularist -- he would say "rationalist" -- in the world.

Sen. Jeff Flake, the Arizona Republican who announced his retirement in a withering speech aimed at President Trump, tells NPR that he is "deeply saddened" to leave the Senate, but that lawmakers must take a stand now against the administration's behavior or "lose that chance."

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The devastation left by Hurricane Maria on September 20 is overwhelming the millions of Americans who are still without power and unable to meet basic needs.

Cheburashkina_Svetlana / Creative Commons

This year marks an important milestone in Russian history -- the 100th anniversary of the 1917 Russian Revolution.

Kris Krüg/PopTech / flickr creative commons

Kurt Andersen's new book is Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire. It's a 500-year history "of America jumping the shark." The idea, largely, is that our present post-fact, fake-news moment is... nothing new.

This hour, we look back at the history. We look at our present -- which is to say, we look at our present president: "To describe [Trump] is practically to summarize this book," Andersen says in Fantasyland. And we wonder if there's any way to regain and retain reality in America.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Legislators in Hartford say they have come to a tentative bipartisan agreement on a new two-year budget. 

Everybody has this feeling that American Democracy isn't what we want it to be right now. It doesn't feel right, it doesn't feel like we're unified even about what the nature of our governance is. 

Feng Wei / Creative Commons

President Trump decertified the internationally-supported Iran nuclear deal Friday but didn't walk away from it. Instead, he kicked it to Congress to determine whether to reimpose sanctions even though the International Atomic Energy Agency has verified Iran was in compliance with the deal.

Pages