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We didn't book any guests today. We decided to take your calls for the entire hour so you could share what's on your mind.

A lot happened this weekend in the news that you may want to talk about. But, instead of encouraging reactions to the latest news, many of you expressed interest on Colin's Facebook page in talking about something deeper. 

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A survey on sexual harassment was handed out Wednesday to anyone who works at the state Capitol, including lobbyists and state legislators.

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The wide-open race for governor means lots of campaigns will need cash if they want to compete in November. In Connecticut, one way to do that is through public financing -- a program called the Citizens’ Election Program. But how, exactly, does the program work?

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Joe Biden is seriously thinking about running for president in 2020. He's got a wealth of political experience and institutional knowledge. He's vibrant and in good health.  He's also seventy-five-years-old. Many of us are quietly wondering if he's too old for the job.

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With controversies swirling around President Trump and the midterm elections approaching, many are asking, how will Evangelicals vote? Some believe values-voting Christians will stay home while others think issues like abortion, immigration, and religious liberty will be enough to drive them to the polls.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The crowded race for governor finally began to narrow this week as Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin announced he is abandoning his bid to be the Democratic Party's nominee.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff / Creative Commons

Does the investigation of Trump lawyer Michael Cohen signal the beginning of the end for the Trump presidency? 

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What is real is no longer a question for philosophers alone. In today's world, it's a question we all contend with on a daily basis. Online, on television, in print and in public discourse, facts, feelings, and flat-out lies all share the same stage.

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

It's going to be a long fight leading up to Election Day, based on newly released campaign fundraising totals in Connecticut's race for governor and the Republican Governors Association's plan to reserve $1.7 million for television ads in the contest.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In light of mismanaged abuse allegations involving two former staffers, U.S. Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty announced Monday she will not seek re-election in November.

This hour, we discuss the significance of Esty's decision -- including what it means for Connecticut's Fifth Congressional District race this year.

Plus: With former VA Secretary David Shulkin out, what lies head for U.S. Veterans Affairs? Is the federal agency on track to become privatized? We find out.

And finally: We sit down with a local Army veteran who recently received a discharge upgrade. Could his story help other Connecticut veterans with less than honorable discharges? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

For almost a decade, Democrats have held all of the state's five seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. But an unexpected development over the past week has given Republicans in Connecticut's Fifth Congressional District new hope for a victory in 2018.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

U.S. Rep. Elizabeth Esty used her personal email address in a confidential severance agreement with former Chief of Staff Tony Baker.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Fifth District representative, Elizabeth Esty has announced she will not stand for re-election in November. The decision follows days of intense pressure on Esty, over her handling of a harassment case in 2016 involving her then-chief of staff. 

John Phelan / Creative Commons

A day after the State Senate blocked the nomination of Andrew McDonald as Connecticut's next chief justice, Senate Democrats are hoping a for procedural do over. Democratic Senate President Martin Looney is calling for one of the 19 senators who voted against McDonald's nomination to file a motion to reconsider. 

John Phelan / Creative Commons

Robocalls, rallies, even an offer by Governor Malloy to make a Republican his next pick to the state's Supreme Court couldn't prevent Andrew McDonald's chief justice nomination from going down in flames.

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