politicians

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This election cycle continues its unpredictable streak. Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are no longer "presumptive" nominees. Allegations of Russian hacking into the Democratic National Committee surround the start of the convention. Bernie Sanders is backing Clinton, but some of his supporters are vocally holding out.

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen  says it's time for Bernie Sanders supporters to unite behind presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton.

"We can't afford to have people sitting on the sidelines complaining," Shaheen said, speaking to NHPR's Morning Edition from Philadelphia.

New York's Bernie Delegates Irritated At DNC

Jul 26, 2016

It’s supposed to be Hillary Clinton’s convention, but all of the focus Monday was on her primary challenger Bernie Sanders and his delegates, who continue to stew over a wikileaks release of DNC emails that showed favoritism to Clinton over Sanders.

“Unity” seems to be the one-word mantra that Democratic National Committee officials are using to frame this week’s national convention in Philadelphia. But many Vermont delegates aren’t ready to hold political hands with their party’s presumptive nominee quite yet.

Why would Russian President Vladimir Putin want to help Donald Trump win the White House?

That's the accusation from Democrats this week, after embarrassing internal Democratic National Committee emails appeared on Wikileaks on the eve of the party's convention in Philadelphia.

The emails were lifted earlier this year in a hacking breach that security experts have linked to Russian espionage groups.

If there was ever a time to show party unity, this would be it. This week's Democratic convention is supposed to be about showing a party standing behind its presumptive nominee, Hillary Clinton — and it was headed in that direction by featuring a speech from Bernie Sanders on opening night Monday.

Ralph Nader is not happy with either the Republican or Democratic candidates for president. He says Republicans tolerating Donald Trump will look back and be ashamed and that Democrats chose a "deeply-rooted corporatist" and "militarist." In fact, he thinks the "two party tyranny" reduces the "voices and choices" of the people and we should all consider a third-party.  

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Scattered across the GOP convention hall floor in Cleveland, Ohio, delegates from around New England have been cheering in support of Donald Trump, a candidate who has run largely on an anti-establishment platform.

It was supposed to be Indiana Gov. Mike Pence's political coming-out party, but drama with Ted Cruz largely overshadowed his moment at the Republican National Convention.

The crowd quickly turned on Cruz on Wednesday night after he refused to endorse GOP nominee Donald Trump.

The Texas senator and Republican primary runner-up was initially met with a warm reception, holding the crowd in the palm of his hand as he told emotional stories about the recent police shootings in Dallas and how America had to defend the Constitution and the freedoms of speech and religion.

Erik Drost / Creative Commons

The Republican National Convention in Cleveland wraps up today following a speech by Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

New Hampshire Republican delegate Gordon Humphrey had some sharp words Monday to describe the way his party is managing its convention.

The former U.S. Senator was among a group of so-called Never Trump delegates trying to force a roll call vote on the proposed convention rules, leading to a chaotic scene on the first day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

The effort by Humphrey and others was ultimately shut down after the roll call was rejected following a series of voice votes.

Speaking to MSNBC afterward, Humphrey criticized the process.

The outcome of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland is predetermined: Donald Trump will get his party’s nomination for president. But there was controversy nonetheless for the 16-person Vermont delegation.

Republicans drafting the party's platform in Cleveland this week rejected appeals to soften language opposing same-sex marriage.

According to NPR, delegates supported language in this year's platform that says children "deserve a married mom and dad," and refers to "natural marriage" as between a man and a woman. 

The Republican National Convention begins in Cleveland on Monday. Republicans will hear from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and Tennessee Senator Bob Corker, who are billed as official Trump-Pence surrogates, as well as CNBC contributor Larry Kudlow.

Mallory Benedict / PBS NewsHour

Most of Connecticut’s delegation arrived this weekend in Cleveland for the Republican National Convention. All are committed to Donald Trump, who won nearly 60% of the Republican vote in the state’s primary.

Mike Licht / Creative Commons

The Republican National Convention kicks off in Cleveland today after several days of pre-convention fireworks, including efforts by anti-Trump delegates to change the rules, Trump's agonizing indecision on his VP, and a changing list of speakers that will include more Trump family members than seasoned politicians. 

Donald Trump could stand to benefit from his reported vice presidential pick Mike Pence in a number of ways, in particular from his strong Christian identity, which might help Trump gain needed support in evangelical communities.

But Pence initially endorsed Ted Cruz, albeit without enthusiasm, and there were some reports that the Indiana governor disliked Trump. Less than a week after Cruz dropped out, Pence endorsed Trump.

Sadie Hernandez / flickr creative commons

As you may have heard, Pokemon is back (are back?) with the release last week of a new game. Pokemon Go is an augmented reality app that, through the magic of GPS on your phone, adds Pokemon to your surroundings, or, at least, to your surroundings as represented on your phone's screen, so that you can catch them.

Erik (HASH) Hersman / Creative Commons

The Republican and Democratic National Conventions are just around the corner. The presumptive nominees? Two of the most unpopular presidential candidates in recent history: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. 

5 Things To Know About Mike Pence

Jul 14, 2016

The buzz about Donald Trump's vice presidential pick is centering on Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

The Indianapolis Star is reporting that Pence "is dropping his re-election bid in Indiana to become Donald Trump's running mate."

Colleen P / Creative Commons

The Grand Old Party puts on its full Cleveland next week to make it official with Donald Trump. Bernie did the math, and endorsed Hillary Clinton. And one of our favorite Connecticut politicians has resurfaced as Clinton fundraiser.

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There are few genres of entertainment more American than the Western. But for a genre so steeped in the iconography of our past, its accuracy in portraying historical event leaves much to be desired. Many argue that the Western is more myth than reality, and that this myth is akin to revisionist history.

Sen. Bernie Sanders endorsed former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination for president Tuesday.

How's this for British irony: The United Kingdom is about to get a new prime minister, Theresa May, who voted in favor of keeping the country in the European Union.

By voting to leave the EU in a June 23 referendum, U.K. voters turned the country's politics upside down and prompted the immediate resignation of Prime Minister David Cameron, a strong backer of remaining in the European body.

Now Cameron's dominant Conservative Party has found a successor, May, the home secretary and a longtime member of Parliament — who also favors staying in the EU.

What gives?

Lori Mack / WNPR

Stand Together was the theme of a rally in New Haven Sunday, where city officials, community leaders, and New Haven residents gathered at one of the city’s African-American churches. 

KAZ Vorpal / Creative Commons

Donald Trump wants to advance his business interests in Russia - and Vladimir Putin couldn't be happier. Putin's geopolitical interests rely on weakening the West. To that end, he has supported right-wing populists in Europe for more than a decade.  

Donald Trump may be the perfect tool to help Putin destroy the West. He supports many of the goals of Putin and has openly admired him. He's cultivated ties to Russia for a long time, including with a Russian gangster once jailed for slashing a man's face with a broken margarita glass. To make it worse, Trump has surrounded himself with advisors with shady ties to Russia.

The leaders of a Connecticut American Indian tribe are accusing Donald Trump’s presidential campaign of disrespecting Native Americans. In a statement released on Thursday, the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation calls Trump’s campaign tactics and behavior bigoted and ignorant.  

When I first heard the news after midnight Thursday that a sniper had killed police officers in Dallas, my first thought was, "Oh, no."

"Oh, no" for the officers and their families, for those trying to peacefully protest recent police shootings. But that "Oh, no" was also for what could come next and a fear for our country, for race relations, for an American people in the midst of a dark presidential campaign that is threatening to tear at the seams of the fabric of our quilted country.

Donald Trump on Friday morning condemned the shootings of Dallas law enforcement officers Thursday night as well as the deaths of two black men who were killed by police in the previous days.

In light of the events, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee also canceled his expected trip to Miami, where he had reportedly planned to meet with Hispanic leaders.

In his first response to the shootings this week, Trump called for restoring "law and order" and "confidence of our people to be safe and secure in their homes and on the street."

After seven years, the British have released the findings of inquiry into the Iraq War.

NPR's Lauren Frayer says that the 6,000-page report, the result of an investigation led by retired civil servant John Chilcot, found that Britain rushed to war before all peaceful means were exhausted. Lauren filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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