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Steve Lyon / Creative Commons

An audit by the Connecticut Racial Profiling Prohibition Project showed that the Hartford Police Department neglected to report thousands of traffic stops last year as was required by law.

Keith Allison flickr.com/photos/keithallison / Creatiive Commons

Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently urged cities, counties, and states to honor federal immigration detainer requests, saying if they don’t, they could lose federal money. Specifically, if an immigrant here illegally is arrested, he wants local law enforcement to continue to hold onto that person until federal immigration officials can pick them up.

But Connecticut officials say it’s not that easy -- and it may not be lawful. 

Massachusetts Man Among Those Arrested By ICE While Pursuing Residency

Apr 6, 2017

Leandro Arriaga is a construction worker, a property owner and the father of four children. He’s also been living in the United States without authorization since 2001. His wife, Katherine Ramos, is a naturalized U.S. citizen and said her husband wanted to change his legal status. That’s what ultimately got him arrested last week by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials.

Olgierd Rudak flickr.com/photos/olgierd / Creative Commons

Connecticut is rapidly emerging as one of the most progressive states in the nation on the issue of protecting its undocumented population. Governor Dannel Malloy has made a point of saying state law enforcement will not do the job of immigration agents in Connecticut. But there’s a seeming disconnect in one part of the state’s policy that has immigrants rights groups concerned. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

State officials have urged immigrant families to make plans for their children, in case parents are deported. Connecticut may be home to as many as 22,000 U.S. citizen children, whose parents are undocumented. 

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