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Drones: Law Enforcement’s Newest Recruits

Apr 16, 2018
MIKI Yoshihito / Creative Commons

Rapidly advancing technology is changing the way we do a lot of things... including policing.

This hour: police drones are coming to Hartford. Are they an invasion of privacy or a helpful tool for law enforcement? And how are lawmakers debating this new technology? What do you think about police using drones? Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court has again stepped into the bitter public turmoil over police shootings of civilians, ruling Monday that an Arizona police officer is shielded from being sued for shooting a woman in her own front yard.

The court said the officer acted reasonably, given that the woman, Amy Hughes, was carrying a large kitchen knife, that she was standing within striking distance of a woman who the officer did not know was Hughes' roommate, and that Hughes failed to drop the knife when ordered to do so.

How U.S. Customs Officers Are Trained

Mar 15, 2018
At the federal law enforcement training center in Brunswick, Georgia, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer trainees conduct a border crossing drill.
Jesse Costa / WBUR

It looks just like an airport customs checkpoint.

Role players wait in lines, each playing different travelers that a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer is likely to encounter. Some may be playing the role of refugee, others are told to act as though they're hiding something sinister.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

In the wake of last month’s high school shooting in Parkland, Florida, many parents are wondering what to do — or who to look to — if a potential threat is uncovered at their child’s school. Parents in Avon were recently confronted by the reality of a school lockdown.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In our first live broadcast from Connecticut Public Radio’s studio at Gateway Community College, Where We Live sits down with New Haven’s Police Chief Anthony Campbell.

Bridgeport To Pilot Police Body Cameras

Feb 21, 2018

Connecticut’s largest city has begun a pilot program to test body cameras for its police officers.

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

The FBI says that someone called its tip line to report concerns about Nikolas Cruz, who has told police he killed 17 people in a Florida high school this week — but that the bureau failed to follow protocols to assess the threat.

The bureau says a person close to Cruz contacted the FBI's Public Access Line on Jan. 5 to report concerns about him. Those concerns included information about Cruz's gun ownership, a desire to kill people, erratic behavior and disturbing social media posts.

Screenshot

Guilford police are continuing their investigation into the shooting death of a 15-year-old high school student.

Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

The family of 15-year old Jayson Negron, who was shot by a Bridgeport police officer last May, say they still want action, after an investigation recommended no charges in the case.

Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

The State’s Attorney in Waterbury has cleared a Bridgeport police officer in the fatal shooting last year of a 15-year-old boy.

Tony Webster / Creative Commons

New Haven police are investigating their first homicide of 2018 after a reported shooting Tuesday night. This comes just after the city released record low homicide numbers last year. According to the city’s police department, homicides in 2017 were the lowest in decades.

A reform agreement has come to an end between the U.S. Department of Justice and the Town of East Haven, Connecticut.

Wikimedia Commons

A gun buy-back sponsored by local legislators, law enforcement, and medical professionals will take place this Saturday in Hartford and New Haven.

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