WNPR

poetry

Curt Richter, Chion Wolf / WNPR

Colin McEnroe is taking a couple weeks off, so today Chion Wolf introduces you to three Connecticut residents who have careers in very different fields of expertise.

Pete Birkinshaw / flickr creative commons

This week in pop culture: Delta and Bank of America decide Shakespeare is in poor taste. Megan Kelly decides Alex Jones is worthy of a platform. Senators John McCain and Richard Burr decide that Senator Kamala Harris shouldn't get to finish her sentences. And Bob Dylan decides to troll the Nobel committees.

Derek Σωκράτης Finch / flickr creative commons

So, it turns out the world didn't end last week. Or the week before that. Or the week before that.

And while it might seem like the events of the last year or so are the disease, maybe they're really just the symptoms; maybe they're really just signs of the dystopia around us.

But, then: Which dystopia?

David DesRoches/WNPR

Each student took the stage in front of hundreds of their peers at Hill Central High School. And one by one, they revealed their passions, their fears, their hopes and insecurities. And one by one, their words were met with thunderous applause.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

War and poverty displace millions of people around the world.

This hour, we hear from two Connecticut artists who have personal experience with the global refugee and migrant crisis.

wackystuff / flickr creative commons

The Faust myth comes from a German folktale that's centuries old. But does a day of your life go by where you don't hear someone invoking the "I'd sell my soul for x" cliche?

Just look at coffee Twitter every morning.

Peter Bienkowski

It’s 1975. Saigon has fallen to the North Vietnamese. The end of the war is the beginning of a global humanitarian crisis.

Fifteen years later, the poet Ocean Vuong and his refugee family arrive in Hartford. He is two years old. The first place they stay is in a hotel.

Derek Σωκράτης Finch / flickr creative commons

So, it turns out the world didn't end last week.

And while it might seem like the events of the last year or so are the disease, maybe they're really just the symptoms; maybe they're really just signs of the dystopia around us.

But, then: Which dystopia?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

War and poverty displace millions of people around the world.

This hour, we hear from two Connecticut artists who have personal experience with the global refugee and migrant crisis.

Love, Politics, and Leonard Cohen

Nov 14, 2016
Rama / Creative Commons

Leonard Cohen, one of our greatest poets, died last Monday and was buried on Thursday next to his parents in a cemetery in Montreal. The cause of his death was leukemia. The likely cause of the leukemia was a lifetime of smoking. 

Brandon Carson / Creative Commons

Patti Smith wasn't seeking fame when she landed in Manhattan in 1969.  She was a fan of the greats of the day - like Dylan, Mapplethorpe, Pollock, Ginsberg - who she followed and emulated, hoping to find her own creative space next to those she most admired. 

T. Charles Erickson

We've never sent a Nose panel to a play before. So this week, we figured we'd try it out. So we've all gone to see Steve Martin's world premiere at the Long Wharf in New Haven: Meteor Shower.

Carlos Puma / UC Riverside

This Sunday in Farmington, the Sunken Garden Poetry Festival will feature Latino poetry and music, including a performance by U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera. 

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

No one likes a cloudy sky. A cloud on the horizon is seen as a harbinger of doom. We feel like clouds need to have silver linings.

But here's our thesis: Clouds are unfairly maligned.

Justin O' Brien

"Black Boy Jungle" is a performance piece that incorporates multiple styles of dance, including modern, ballet and break dancing, along with narration and live music. It's a high-energy, interactive work with twists and surprises. 

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