photography

In the raging 1970s, New York City was dangerous, broke and at times on fire.

Latinos in the city were taking to the streets, running for office and carving out artistic spaces. "Latino" at the time in New York meant "Puerto Rican."

Connecticut Historical Society

Today, many people carry cameras around with them in their pockets or purses; the iPhone 4, 4s and 5 are the three most popular cameras on the photo-sharing site Flickr. With cameras all around us, it’s difficult to imagine an era in which making a photograph was a time-consuming process that required an understanding of chemistry and a willingness to cart around heavy equipment and inhale noxious fumes, but upon its invention in 1839, and for several decades after, it was just that.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Wheelhouse Digest today turns to family matters as we recover from a recent overdose of political craziness. Two brothers from Connecticut visited WNPR to talk about a unique book of photographs to be released on October 30. And Newtown resident Jimmy Greene talked with The New York Times about grieving for the loss of his daughter by continuing his work as a musician. That and more below.

Christopher Capozziello / From "The Distance Between Us"

Photographer Christopher Capozziello has been photographing his twin brother Nick for as long as he's been a photographer. Despite being twins, there was something between them: Nick was born with cerebral palsy. Chris was not. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Photographer Christopher Capozziello has been photographing his twin brother Nick for years. Despite being twins, there was a major difference between these two: Nick was born with cerebral palsy. Chris was not.

The photography of both brothers’ is featured in the book The Distance Between Us. It tells the story about how both Capozziellos are living and coping with Nick’s condition.

Bob Skinner is an architectural photographer by trade who photographs multimillion-dollar properties around New York. He doesn't often photograph people for his commercial work, but by his own admission, he is something of a "people person."

"I've learned that I can stand in the middle of a field with a camera and people will approach me. I'm very approachable. People say, 'You are a magnet,' and they just come up and start speaking with me."

pellesten, Flickr Creative Commons

Here is Instagram by the numbers:

The number you're mostly likely to know is $1 billion, which is what Facebook paid to buy Instagram, a photo-sharing phone application.

Instagram has 30 million registered users.

Those users have uploaded over 1 billion photos.

The current rate is 5 million photos per day.

Instagram users click "like"  575 times per second.

During storm Sandy, Instagram users uploaded storm related pictures at a rate of ten per second.

Chion Wolf

When Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was killed last month, the photos quickly become public and the media had to make a decision.

Many news organizations had slideshows of Gadhafi’s death on their websites. Some published the photos in their newspapers. Even fewer put it on the front page.

Mary Ellen Bartley

Faith Middleton talks with a photographer who aims to capture the texture of oceans; and psychiatrist Joyce McFadden explores how to handle sexuality with your daughter.

 

Your Daughter's Bedroom: Insights for Raising Confident Women

Your Daughter’s Healthy Identity Starts With You

Eric Gottesman

An exhibit by photographer, Eric Gottesman, has opened at Real Art Ways in Hartford. It's part of the art organization's Step Up exhibition series that profiles emerging artists.

Eric spoke with WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil about his installation, "Tinsae." 

The photographs  chronicle the conversations he's had with a 13-year-old boy from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

More about Eric at: http://www.ericgottesman.net

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