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oceans

Sea Levels Rising Fastest in a "Northeast Hot Spot"

Jun 28, 2012
NASA (Wikimedia Commons)

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey say that in the past 20 years, the sea level has risen more in an area they call the "Northeast hot spot" than anywhere else on the continent, a finding they say was unexpected.

Chion Wolf

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The “age of exploration” is long past. We’ve charted most every inch of the planet, So what’s left to explore?

It seems we’re no longer sending men and women into space, and even if you make it to the arctic or the top of Mount Everest you’re sure to have cell phone service. Well, at least you can tweet about it.

Inst. for Exploration & Inst. for Archaeological Oceanography

Dr. Robert Ballard is probably the world’s most famous explorer - in part because of his Titanic discovery - in part because of his tireless mission to uncover secrets of the deep.

Chris Deacutis (Flickr Creative Commons)

Courtesy of Shedd Aquarium By Keith Pamper

Partnerships are common at zoos and aquariums for breeding programs but what does it take to transfer animals across the country safely?  Especially if the animal you're talking about is a 2100 pound beluga whale?

Kristine Magao, Supervisor of Belugas, at Mystic Aquarium spoke with WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil about the recent journey of Naluark, a male beluga whale who came to Mystic from Chicago's John G Shedd Aquarium.

© Ocean Exploration Trust

After discovering the shipwrecked Titanic in 1985, Dr. Robert Ballard could have retired and still gone down as one of the greatest explorers ever. More than 25 years later though, he’s still at it.

His latest expedition is underway and he’s monitoring its every move from his control room in Mystic Aquarium, his computer at home, and on his iPhone everywhere else.

puuikibeach, creative commons

The number of shark attacks reported worldwide increased 25% in 2010.

That sounds scary!  Until you realize that the worldwide total is 79.  And despite an increase in shark sightings, the shark population is actually declining.

Today, where we live, while the Discovery Channel has their beloved Shark Week, we’re taking a small bite out of the action with our own shark day.

Morris Cove Neighbors Say "No Dumping Here"

Jul 12, 2011
Allan Appel, New Haven Independent

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has a plan to move silt and sediment from Bridgeport’s Harbor to the New Haven Harbor. But some city residents are doing their best to keep that from happening.


New Haven Mayor John DeStefano and Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro joined about fifty protestors who gathered recently on the shoreline in Morris Cove -- a neighborhood of New Haven that looks out onto New Haven Harbor and Long Island Sound.  In the water are kayakers, and a line of boats 40 deep, all with anti-dumping signs…

"Thank you boaters! Thank you for coming out!

"

These Islands Are For The Birds

May 26, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

Beginning this week, residents are being asked to stay off two Connecticut islands. Connecticut’s environmental agency wants to allow the birds to nest, undisturbed. The public will not be allowed on Duck Island in Westbrook or on Charles Island in Milford until the beginning of September.

Obama: Coast Guard "Never Been More Important"

May 19, 2011
Chion Wolf/WNPR

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President Obama gave the commencement address at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London Wednesday afternoon. Although he generally steered clear of policy, the President says the branch has never been more important.

President Obama only mentioned the recent death of Osama bin Laden once during his speech. But he did give the Coast Guard credit as part of the front line for Homeland Security.

J. Holt, WNPR

Connecticut’s marine industry is one of many facing tax increases in governor Malloy’s proposed budget. But those in the industry say the changes could have unintended consequences. 

Early April is a quiet time for boating here in Connecticut. Most pleasure boats are still tucked under winter covers, but for Connecticut boatyards this is just as important a time of year as any other.

At pilot’s point marina in Westbrook, Rives Potts is inspecting a 46 foot sailboat that his yard has been rebuilding in one of their sheds.

Boaters Can Help Stop Spread Of Invasive Species

Apr 8, 2011
Andres Musta

The state Department of Environmental Protection is training volunteers to educate boaters about invasive species on Candlewood Lake. Last fall the invasive zebra mussel was found in Lakes Zoar and Lillinonah. The mussel can be carried in boats from one lake to another. Eleanor Mariani of the D.E.P. says the volunteers will ask boaters to make sure they’ve cleaned their vessels if they’ve been in a lake that contains the mussel.

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