non-profits

Chion Wolf

Yesterday’s national “day of action” for Occupy Wall Street was meant to mark the movement’s two-month anniversary...but it also came just after a forceful eviction from the park in lower Manhattan where the protests started.

Chion Wolf/WNPR

More than 100 people chanting and carrying signs marched through downtown Hartford yesterday, calling for jobs, public safety and infrastructure investment, and an end to corporate greed.  As WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, the march was part of a national protest to declare an economic emergency. The culmination of the rally was to be the occupation of a busy onramp to Interstate 84.  On the way there, people from labor groups, community organizations, and the Occupy Hartford movement talked about what brought them out.

Chion Wolf

We keep hearing that the job prospects for young workers aren't very good. So, what if they start their own businesses? 

Today, we're live from the Oakdale Theater in Wallingford for the last Small Business Breakfast of the year. It's taking place as part of the Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce Business Expo.

Chion Wolf Photo

The panel looking into the state's response to two damaging storms this year heard from electricity providers today/yesterday. As WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, the panel want to know what needs to happen to keep the lights on the next time weather strikes. Executives from United Illuminating and Connecticut Light & Power appeared before the panel. Joe McGee is the body's co-chair, and he was particularly interested in two areas of inquiry.  First, he wanted to know whether the prospect of fining utilities could prompt them to do more before a storm approaches. 

Flickr Creative Commons, david_shankbone

New York did not cover itself in glory last night as it used the wee small hours of the morning to play rough with the press and Occupy Wall Street.

Reports are jumbled, but there doesn't seem much doubt that reporters doing their jobs were shoved around and in some cases arrested.

These are not the tactics of a free society.

The Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether it's constitutional to make Americans buy health insurance -- and if not, whether the rest of the health care overhaul can take effect.  The court's announcement means some uncertainty for Connecticut and states across the country.

Chion Wolf

By the end of  2010, over 15 percent of the nation’s population lived below the federal poverty line— that's just over $22 thousand dollars for a family of four.

Over a ten-year span, the US saw the poor population grow by 12.3 million, driving the total number of Americans in poverty to a historic high of 46.2 million.

...and the number of those poor people living in the suburbs increased by 25%. New research from the Brookings Institute explores how poverty is shifting from inner cities to the suburbs.

On Deadline

Nov 9, 2011
thomasbonte, creative commons

Today CL&P faces their final deadline to have everyones power back on. Are you still in the 1%?

Flickr Creative Commons, Steve Snodgrass

Jewett City, a community of 2.5 square miles in southeastern Connecticut, has its own power company, owned by the town. There are seven non-profit companies like this in the state. They're small, which means they can coordinate closely with other branches of government. Heck, they can coordinate with branches on trees.

West Hartford Center

Nov 7, 2011
conbon33, creative commons

Donald Poland’s research focuses on the remaking of urban spaces, and he’s using West Hartford Center as a case study.

Poland argues that this type of space is not “explained” by current studies of urban areas - which focus instead on big cities and metro areas.

Today - where we live - we’ll explore West Hartford Center which he describes as both “resilient and mundane.”

Still In The Dark

Nov 4, 2011
Chion Wolf

Governor Dannel Malloy deployed the troops six days after the snowstorm that tore down powerlines and left millions of Northeast residents in the dark.

Still, as of this morning, 300 thousand customers are without power in Connecticut - making the state the slowest to respond.  

Some residents in the hardest-hit areas are forming “vigilante” tree crews to clear debris - something that CL&P officials say could be dangerous.  

Chion Wolf

Yesterday, Wolfie and I walked the Wallace Stevens route with our friend the Hartford film-maker Helder Mira and intern Andrew Kufta. We started at the first marker.

A Banking Roundtable

Nov 3, 2011
Chion Wolf

President Obama just unveiled a new plan to help homeowners avoid foreclosure...but what other help is out there?

The state of Connecticut is working to help homeowners as well...sponsoring a mortgage assistance event  on Tuesday November 15.  

Chion Wolf

In the audio embedded here, you'll hear Wednesday afternoon interviews with Gov. Danel P. Malloy, energy and environment commissioner Dan Esty, a vice-president for CL&P, an electrical workers' union official, a key state legislator and a consultant on how utilities can change their infrastructure to make it more storm-resistant.

Patrick Raycraft, The Hartford Courant

You're about to meet Poster Boy, an artist who defaces and rearranges advertising posters so that new messages appear. His work is up at Real Art Ways and we recorded this interview late last week.

Chion Wolf

The state legislature is calling a special session tomorrow. It’s a tale of two bills: Jobs and Jackson Labs.

Governor Malloy has unveiled a jobs plan.  It’s focused on small business growth, startup investments for innovative firms, and streamlining the process for business to get things done.  
These are all ideas that the governor and legislative leaders expect to get some level of bi-partisan support.

Flickr Creative Commons, davidsonscott15

Being a police chief is a difficult job. Chiefs manage an entire department and have to contend with politicians, citizens and unions. It's hard to satisfy everyone. In Connecticut, there's recently been a lot of shakeups among police chiefs.

Here's our story so far - In Hartford, police Chief Daryl Roberts has decided to retire or has been squeezed out, depending on whom you believe. Over in New Haven, Police Chief Frank Limon has left that job way ahead of schedule, maybe by mutual consent, depending on whom you believe.

thoth, creative commons

The EPA has been criticized for being both “regulators gone wild” and “regulators gone missing.”

The Environmental Protection Agency has been the target of legislation passed in recent weeks by the Republican-led House.  The bills aim to gut existing regulations - while forcing the agency to examine the economic impact of the work it does.  This movement the heart of a new book by Richard Trzupek about how many Republicans think the EPA kills jobs.

Jobs and the Economy

Oct 17, 2011
Chion Wolf

America is looking for ways to create jobs and avoid a prolonged recession. Europe is looking for ways to solve their own economic crisis.

But how do problems there affect your wallet here - and the other way around?  And what are the best ways to deal with our economic troubles?

Flickr Creative Commons, david_shankbone

Are we all entitled to a few blind spots? If so, one of mine is newspapers. I keep thinking somebody is going to find ways to improve them and make them thrive, even as the evidence of my own eyes suggests the opposite.

Today on The Nose, one of our panelists is Susan Campbell from the Hartford Courant. A few weeks ago, she shuttered her blog on the newspaper's web site. And this week, her colleague Helen Ubinas announced that she's leaving.

Christina Kishimoto

Oct 14, 2011
Chion Wolf

Hartford Public Schools have been the subject of books, documentaries and national news stories...and not always cast in the most positive light.

Hartford’s has long had status as one of the poorest cities in the country - and with that has come trouble in its education system: A state takeover, an attempt at privatization, a civil-rights lawsuit, and a series of “reformers” who left the city too quick to make any real changes.

Deb Heinrich

Oct 13, 2011
creative commons

Our recent conversation with Robert Egger, the social enterprise pioneer, got us thinking more about the role of non-profits in the state.  In fact, he thinks Connecticut has a leg up in the way it thinks about the non-profit sector, having appointed Deb Heinrich, a former state lawmaker, to the job as “liason” earlier this year.  We sat down earlier this week with Heinrich to talk about “social enterprise” and the scope of her work for Governor Malloy.

Photo: City of Hartford

In Hartford, city officials have been wrestling with a possible ethical issue for months.  The question was whether the city treasurer should be allowed to supervise his wife.  Now, as WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, city officials say an agreement is near.

What the Fribble?!

Oct 12, 2011
Robert Banh

Today’s guest says when it comes to restaurants only three things matter: food, service and ambiance.

He says if restaurants don’t reinvent themselves every ten years or so, they’re doomed.

So goes our beloved Friendly’s, which hasn’t changed it’s decor in.... uh 50 years?! And the service and food were nothing to scream about.

Flickr Creative Commons, gareth1953

The Cricket Hall of Fame inducted six new members last weekend. We talk with the center's director about the organization's mission, cricket in Connecticut and why they chose to set up their home base in Hartford.

Come to think of it, does cricket even have a home base?

Leave your comments below, e-mail colin@wnpr.org or Tweet us @wnprcolin.

Flickr Creative Commons, andylepp

The English jurist William Blackstone said "Better that ten guilty men go free than that one innocent suffer."

In recent years, I've seen Blackstone's ratio, when it's cited, shrink down to four to one, as if there's been some kind of deflation of the presumption of innocence. I also wonder how it would fare as a poll question. It's an older idea than Blackstone's 18th century. It's as old as Genesis, as old as Maimonides, but there seem to be plenty of people eager to convict the guilty and not commensurately worried about the innocent.

Chion Wolf

Ted Carroll is celebrating his 25th year as president of Leadership Greater Hartford, one of the largest community-based leadership organizations in the country. The organization honors him for his service at their annual Polaris Awards September 27.

Because we’re based in Hartford - we care about our community. But we often find ourselves talking about what’s broken...not what’s working. Carroll has been working as a leader and a mentor for decades...and he’s spread his message about mentorship around the world.

Flickr Creative Commons, 104Muttons

What are we watching when we watch (and cheer about) a college game?

Historian Taylor Branch disputes the notion that we are watching a logical, natural outgrowth of the college's academic identity. If you're a student, are those your fellow students playing football? If you're an alumnus, are those people on the basketball court extensions of what you used to be?

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