Newtown

gre.ceres, creative commons

The recommendations on gun safety from Vice President Biden to President Obama include: requiring background checks for all gun sales, banning the sale of certain rapid-fire weapons and ensuring mentally ill people can’t acquire guns

Other proposals like these are being considered at the state houses in Hartford and Albany. Since the Sandy Hook shootings, we’ve been talking a lot about guns: about magazine capacities and 2nd Amendment rights.  About “assault weapons” and arming teachers.

Families Of Newtown Victims Launch New Initiative

Jan 14, 2013

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Family members of those killed at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut, have spent the past month grieving. Now, some of them have banded together and say they're ready to be part of a national discussion about how to make our communities safer. They call themselves the Sandy Hook Promise. Jeff Cohen, of member station WNPR, has the story.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Last month, on December 13, Governor Malloy appeared on our show for his monthly visit. We talked about the budget and the upcoming legislative session, and the issues he hoped to work on in the coming year.  

The next morning, everything changed.

Jeff Cohen/WNPR

The investigation into last month's shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School may take months to complete. The governor says the shooter's motive may never be known.

Safe School Climate

Jan 2, 2013
FrankJuarez, Creative Commons

The children of Sandy Hook Elementary school go back to class today, in a new school in Monroe.

Officials of that district are putting a premium on the safety of these students - physically and emotionally - as they try to return their lives to normal.

But around the country, students are heading back to a school today where they DON’T feel safe - whether it’s from bullying, exclusion, or violence that projects from outside the school walls.

Toy Donations Pour Into Newtown For The Holidays

Dec 24, 2012

The Monday after the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., toys and stuffed animals began arriving by the truckload. Ten days later, the gymnasium at Edmond Town Hall in the center of Newtown is full of them.

"When I realized that it was getting so large, I thought that we should get this to the children before the holidays," says Ann Benore, a caseworker for Newtown Social Services.

Flickr Creative Commons, Generaal Gibson

One of the verbal melodies that sustained me during the past year was the notion that people can be divided into two camps: those who think they're living in a comedy and those who think they dwell in a drama.

Photo by Lucy Nalpathanchil

The sound of bells reverberated throughout the nation and in towns across Connecticut Friday, December 21 at 9:30 a.m. to remember the twenty children and six adults who were murdered at Sandy Hook Elementary School one week ago.

Chion Wolf

Church bells across the state and the nation tolled 26 times to honor those killed one week ago at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.

So much has changed about where we live in this last week. And we've spent this time trying to grapple with the emotions - and the possible solutions. But after so much talk - and so much more to come - we thought we'd take today to listen.

Chion Wolf

John Woodall is a psychiatrist whose work has taken him to Bosnia, New Orleans, Uganda, and to New York City after 9/11.

Chion Wolf photo

Banning guns and ammunition—does it make sense and will it make us safer? We have a Connecticut police lieutenant with twenty-six years of experience, a consultant internationally on violence prevention. We look at whether gun bans will work and what we need to do to protect soft targets like schools and churches. He's frank; he's seen a lot in the communities he visits. It's not just America's problem, it turns out. It's a worldwide problem.

Flickr Creative Commons, daveyrockwell

Watching the coverage of Newtown unfold on Friday, I grew upset by the number of wrong reports.

Francois Polito (Wikimedia Commons)

Beyond the horror of the childern and teachers killed, why do mass shootings, like the one in Newtown, affect us so deeply?

We hear statistics all the time about how unlikely an event like this is -- how schools are actually safer.

Here’s Daniel Webster from the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research last night on NPR’s All Things Considered:

Grieving in Newtown

Dec 18, 2012
Neena Satija

Hundreds of people from across the region continue to pay their respects in Newtown today, where a makeshift memorial has sprung up just down the street from Sandy Hook Elementary School.

Mourners leave bouquets of roses and posters with words of prayer and the names of 27 victims. Children have tucked toys and stuffed animals among the cluster of decorated wreaths and little Christmas trees. And people who’ve never met embrace each other.

Photo by Chion Wolf

School leaders are talking about ways to improve school security and crisis plans after the shooting deaths at a Newtown elementary school. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports 

Across the state, children went back to school again today/Monday.  And in many school districts, there's an increased security presence. WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports. It's the first day back at school and I'm in Canton -- an hour from Newtown.  I came to Cherry Brook Primary School to speak to parents as they dropped their kids off.  One parent cried and then apologized when I asked her to talk.

Chion Wolf

I'm not a big fan of getting ready to fight the previous war. Our next crisis will not be Adam Lanza. It will not be an exact replica of the facts of his life, not that we know those for sure yet. (I would say, parenthetically, that the worldwide rush to diagnose Lanza makes me massively uncomfortable.)

Harriet Jones

Security will be heightened at many Connecticut schools as students return to class. But as WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, that won’t begin to address the questions that many parents have.

“….we intend to have a normal day tomorrow….”

Superintendent of Hamden schools, Fran Rabinowitz addresses a crowd of around 200 parents Sunday at a meeting intended to reassure them about the reopening of school. Rabinowitz says she wasn’t surprised by the high turnout.

Mourning for Newtown

Dec 17, 2012
Chion Wolf

President Barack Obama and Governor Dannell Malloy spoke at an interfaith prayer vigil held last night in Newtown, Connecticut. As that community attempts to heal - we’ll be looking at how our entire state is dealing with this tragedy.

Last Friday the tragedy was unfolding as we were finishing up a lighthearted program about what makes Connecticut unique. As we heard from the President - this could have happened anywhere in America...and since he’s been president, it has.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We're going go get an update now on the shooting rampage today at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut. Twenty-seven people at Sandy Hook School were killed, including the gunman. Craig LeMoult of member station WSHU is with us now. And, Craig, what's the latest there?

Diane Orson

Prayer vigils were held across Connecticut and around the country this weekend for the victims of Friday’s massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary school in Newtown. 

Bells on the New Haven green tolled 27 times for each of those who died.

Several hundred people gathered Saturday evening for a candlelight vigil. They stood near the flagpole on the New Haven green, a few steps away from the glow of the city’s Christmas tree.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Newtown, Connecticut, the small New England community continues to mourn after Friday's shooting that claimed the lives of so many children. Families with children in the school who survived the shooting are struggling to explain the tragedy to their kids. But they're also trying to retain some normalcy in the holiday season.

Jeff Cohen, from member station WNPR, met up with one family.

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