Newtown

Chion Wolf / WNPR

"This song is about unrequited love - loving someone that just won't be able to give it back to you," said Goodnight Blue Moon's Erik Elligers. He's talking about a song off his band's new EP A Girl I Never Met called "Baby" and it's a song that has special meaning for us at WNPR.

CT-N

Governor Dannel Malloy's Sandy Hook Advisory Commission met on Friday morning to hear from experts in behavioral health and crisis counseling services.

The first slate of presenters included Dr. Daniel Dodgen of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Dr. Thomas Demaria of Long Island University, and Vincent Giordano of Denizen Consulting. Read more in the agenda for the meeting.

Governor Dannel Malloy's Sandy Hook Commission has been told there is no data connecting people with autism to increased violent criminal behavior. A Stony Brook University psychology professor addressed the panel on Friday saying there is nothing that links autism to the type of planned massacre that occurred in in Newtown in 2012. Recently released documents show gunman Adam Lanza had been diagnosed in 2006 with a profound autism disorder.

Michael Travers/iStock / Thinkstock

Ever since The New York Daily News published the audio of a phone call to the radio show of an Oregon grunge anarcho-primitivist, I've been wondering what the hell to do with what appears to be the sound of Adam Lanza talking, about a year before the Newtown shootings.

CT-N

The governor's Sandy Hook Advisory Commission met Friday to discuss mental health and autism. As it did, it got an update from its chairman, Hamden Mayor Scott Jackson, on his discussions with the father of Newtown gunman Adam Lanza. 

Newtown Action Alliance

The Newtown Action Alliance and the Campaign to Unload held a rally on Monday morning outside the offices of Newtown-based National Shooting Sports Foundation.

CT-N

Governor Malloy's Sandy Hook Advisory Commission met for the first time today since the state police released thousands of pages of documents stemming from the investigation into the Dec. 14, 2012 shooting in Newtown. One issued raised was how to keep people safe inside a building without hindering the progress of rescuers.

CT-N

The head of the governor's commission studying the Newtown shootings said he is direct contact with the family of gunman Adam Lanza. 

The commission that met Friday is hoping to learn more about Lanza's medical history.

Digital Vision / Thinkstock

In the wake of the Newtown shootings, there's been a lot of debate about whether tighter gun laws save lives. A new Quinnipiac University study says two such laws don't, and one may even cause gun deaths to rise.

creative commons

Neuroscientist James Fallon found something shocking when he was looking at brain scans of serial killers for research, and brain scans of his family for signs of disease. According to the scan, his own brain was no different than that of a psychopath. The discovery opened up a new world of research, TED talks and his recent book, The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain. 

State of Connecticut

The state police have released the results of their investigation into last year's Newtown shootings. But some remain critical of how long it took them to do so.

Digital Vision / Thinkstock

This hour, we talk with neuroscientist James Fallon. He found something shocking when he was looking at brain scans of serial killers. We’ll talk about his book The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain and what his research might tell us about Sandy Hook shooter Adam Lanza.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Late last week, state police released the thousands of documents that made up their investigation into the Newtown shootings. Even though more is now known about the gunman who killed 20 children, six educators, his mother, and himself, it doesn't appear that anything gunman Adam Lanza did before December 14, 2012 could have gotten serious attention from law enforcement.

State of Connecticut

There are a lot of people who, for understandable reasons, would like the story of the Sandy Hook shootings to fade away. But, of course it never will. It's part of our molecular structure, especially here in Connecticut. 

This hour, we touch on some of the questions answered  by the release of the state's so called final report on the murders. We also talk about some of the questions that haven't been answered and the peculiar, to some of us, reluctance by the state to release this report. 

Connecticut State Police have released an exhaustive report on last year's Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, offering some new details on the massacre that left 20 first-graders and six educators dead.

Photographs taken by investigators of the home that 20-year-old shooter Adam Lanza shared with his mother show "numerous rounds of ammunition, gun magazines, shot-up paper targets, gun cases, shooting earplugs and a gun safe with a rifle in it," The Associated Press writes.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Last month, the state prosecutor who investigated the shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown released his much-awaited report.

Now, the state police have released a report of their own into the shooting that left 20 children and six educators dead. Officials said they are redacting the state police file, which is several thousand pages long.

State of Connecticut

One of the enduring questions in the aftermath of the Newtown shooting is whether Adam Lanza's mental health contributed to his decision to kill 20 children, six educators, his mother, and himself. But privacy laws have gotten in the way of answering it.

Nicole Hockley says she used to be the kind of person who knew where she was going in life. Then, last Dec. 14, her 6-year-old son, Dylan, was one of the 26 victims killed by a gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary.

"Every plan I had went out the window, and I just kind of lost my way in terms of where do you go from here, how do you pick yourself up and move forward and find a new path," Hockley says.

The phone kept ringing at home, and media outlets sent flowers with cards asking for interviews.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's been one year since the tragic shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School transformed Newtown, Connecticut, the country, and the world. Over the last year, there have been countless musical tributes to the victims.

This hour, we share some of the music that came out of this tragedy. 

A Year After Shooting, Bells Toll In Newtown

Dec 14, 2013

As a steady snow blanketed Newtown, this morning, the bells at St. Rose of Lima church tolled 26 times. After each, a name was read.

It was an intimate acknowledgment of the 20 children and six educators who were killed by a gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary School one year ago today.

The town asked for privacy and decided not to have any formal remembrance services.

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama, meanwhile, lit 26 candles at the Map Room of the White House. After all the votives were lit, they paused for a moment of silence.

Pete Souza / White House

Governor Dannel Malloy was quick to say that he didn't, and doesn't, want to make what happened in Newtown about him.

Still, on that day, Malloy was at the center of the story.  

The shootings on December 14, 2012 at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut affected everyone in the state. As we remember the events of that day, and consider events that have occurred since, join us for a special live broadcast on the one-year anniversary.

We start at 9:00 am with reflection and remembrance, and pause at 9:30 am for the statewide ringing of the bells. Then stay with us for two hours of call-in discussion hosted by John Dankosky and Colin McEnroe, when you'll hear some of our special reporting from the week and voices from around the state.

At noon, Ray Hardman hosts an hour-long music special. 

As much as Dec. 14 will forever be a day of unfathomable grief for Nelba Márquez-Greene, Dec. 13 will be one of unending gratitude.

"I will never forget that day," she says.

On that day, Márquez-Greene stopped the usual frantic drill: rushing to activities and errands, worrying about the dishes and laundry, even cleaning up the mess on the floor.

Michael Saechang / Creative Commons

Since the Newtown shootings last December 14, America has had a long and very heated conversation about guns and violence. 

Lost in the aftermath of this, and other mass shootings, are two realities: the gun debate we just had has little to do with the reality of gun violence in America; and handguns are used in suicide and family violence far more than mass murders. In urban areas, there’s a daily drumbeat of gun-related crime that never grabs the headlines. 

Join us for a conversation that uses hard numbers and personal stories to talk about guns in America.

As Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy sped from Hartford to Newtown nearly a year ago, the death toll kept rising. When he arrived on the scene, he found himself in charge — and it fell to him to answer the question: How long should family members have to wait to learn that their loved ones were gone?

Malloy decided that he was going to do what he thought was right. Still, standing in front of more than two dozen families gathered in a firehouse, he doubted that it was.

Sophfronia Scott

Sandy Hook resident Sophfronia Scott never asked to have these conversations, but since the shooting that left 20 students and six educators dead, they follow her. Like when she tells a person from out of town that she's from Sandy Hook.

"There's that stunned silence, and they say, 'Oh. Oh, those poor people. And how are you doing?'" said Scott. "I will tell them right away, because I know they want to ask, and if anything, I know they are afraid to ask. So I will say to them, 'Yes, I'm from Sandy Hook. Yes, my son attends the school. Yes, he was in the building.'"

Monsignor Robert Weiss has been pastor of St. Rose of Lima church in Newtown, Conn., for 13 years. Half of Newtown attends his church, so he knew many of the children who were killed in the Sandy Hook school shooting last December 14th.

He was the first religious person on the scene that day. Weiss, known as Father Bob in Newtown, still remembers the sound of shattered glass under his feet, and he still can’t sleep at night.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

The discussion after last year's Newtown shootings was dominated by two topics: gun control and mental health. Many people focused on possible illnesses of the shooter, but there’s another side to the mental health discussion. In the aftermath of a tragedy, communities need help healing.

The shooting in Newtown, Conn., last December has left families of the 26 victims, most of them children, struggling to heal in different ways.

Jeremy Richman and Jennifer Hensel are one such family. They lost their only child, 6-year-old Avielle, in the shooting. In the year since, they've responded as any parents would: Asking why such a tragedy could have happened.

Ross MadDonald

Saturday marks the one-year anniversary of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School that left 20 first graders and six educators dead. WNPR will bring you stories throughout this week looking at the impact of that tragedy on our community.

Pages