New Haven Region

Start Bank

The end of an era in New Haven finally seemed like reality last week as Toni Harp won election to the mayor's office. The man she's replacing, John DeStefano, is following 20 years at the head of city government with another prominent role in New Haven. He'll become an executive at New Haven's Start Bank.

Raysonho / Creative Commons

Southern Connecticut State University is holding a weekend meeting for students affected by news that the library science graduate program has lost its national accreditation

Luke Redmond / Creative Commons

If you visit Rockefeller Center this holiday season, you can look up in awe at a New York transplant from Connecticut. The iconic Christmas tree will be cut down in Shelton later today, and shipped to New York City by tractor-trailer, according to the Associated Press. 

WNPR

Perhaps the comment that made East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo, Jr. a staple on "The Daily Show" have faded from the minds of voters. Maybe the conviction of two police officers last month on charges of civil rights violations were overshadowed by Maturo's record on lowering property taxes. Regardless of the reasons, Maturo was elected to his seventh term in office on Tuesday. 

Vox Efx / Creative Commons

It’s a municipal election year, and voters throughout the state hit the polls to vote for their town officials and usually they hit those polls in pretty small numbers. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse discusses the results from around the state plus a casino referendum in Massachusetts. How'd you vote? And how busy were the polls?

Chion Wolf

The New Haven public had suggestions for Mayor-elect Toni Harp at Artspace New Haven's City-Wide Open Studio event this campaign season. A large blackboard, installed in the exhibition room, advised: "New Mayor: Remember To..."

Melissa Bailey / New Haven Independent

New Haven residents will decide today who will be the city’s next mayor. State Senator Toni Harp is facing Alderman Justin Elicker. The winner will replace the retiring Mayor John DeStefano, who served 20 years in office.

Southern Connecticut State University

Southern Connecticut State University's master of library science program is no longer nationally accredited. Earlier this month, the American Library Association heard Southern's appeal of a June decision to withdraw accreditation. Yet on Monday, October 28, the school was notified the ALA has upheld its original decision. The program had been on probation for several issues, including an outdated curriculum, and faculty productivity.

Des Colhoun / Creative Commons

One year ago on Halloween eve, there was a surprising discovery on the New Haven green. It was just days after Superstorm Sandy, and trees had blown down all around town. A giant oak tree toppled over on the green, and there, tangled in its roots, were centuries-old human bones.

Uma Ramiah

America’s 27th President, William Howard Taft, has been in the news recently. New research finds that a diet prescribed for the nation's portliest president looked very similar to today’s low-carb, low-calorie diets. William Howard Taft was a Yale man who weighed 225 pounds when he graduated from college.

Stupidity

The Swedish garage band Stupidity stops by New Haven's Cafe Nine Monday night, October 28. The band is touring the U.S. in support of two new singles on their upcoming album, "Some Kinda Love" and "King Midas." 

A connection between violence and nightclub districts in New Haven has Mayor John DeStefano concerned. He wants to tighten some restrictions on nightclubs after a weekend homicide, and Governor Dannel Malloy is backing him up. Also, The Wheelhouse Digest wants to know from you: do you think we can work our way through local problems in our towns and cities without knowing personally the right person to do the job? Do we sometimes hide behind bureaucracy, or can it be a good shield? That and more below.

Brandon Anderson / Flickr Creative Commons

State and local lawmakers are calling for changes to how nightclubs operate after this weekend's deadly shooting a club in New Haven. On Saturday, Mayor John DeStefano proposed fees for nightclubs in districts where a heavy police presence is required, police licensing and training of private security, and changes to authorization and review of club and alcohol licenses.

"We're all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars," says a character in an Oscar Wilde play. That pretty well sums up Lou Reed. We're both honored and saddened to tackle him as our first topic as we experiment with putting more immediacy into our Monday show. We decided to let the weekend tell us what our topics were. 

T. Charles Erickson

We’ve become full-time fame seekers. Admit it: no matter what age, walk of life, or social standing, just being friended or liked by no one in particular makes our day. We create online personas, instantly publish, and look to find inspiration from the reality television that surrounds us. There, we can root for real cops, middle-class castaways, and cut-throat cooks. 

Veronica538 / Creative Commons

A North Branford trucking company has been ordered to withdraw a lawsuit against two former employees who blew the whistle on dubious safety practices at the business. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration ordered Palumbo Trucking, and owner David Palumbo, to withdraw a retaliatory lawsuit that the company filed against two former workers. 

Diane Orson / WNPR

The city of East Haven does not have a positive national reputation. Earlier this week, a guilty verdict was reached in the case of two local police officers on charges of violating civil rights. Now that the trial is over, how does the town recover and move forward?

Versageek / Wikimedia Commons

We hit the road and took The Wheelhouse to New Haven. We’re joined by local reporters and news watchers to weigh in on this week's news, including analysis of the latest New Haven mayoral debate, the conviction of two East Haven police officers, sexual assault complaints at UConn, and the question: could New Haven make some of their roads run in both directions?

Melanie Stengel / The New Haven Register

A federal jury in Connecticut has found two police officers from the town of East Haven guilty of violating the civil rights of Hispanics. The Justice Department has said the town systematically discriminated against Latinos.

Lauren Manning / Creative Commons

Yale's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library opened its doors 50 years ago this month. The library is celebrating this weekend with a series of events that incorporate items from their collection.

Diane Orson / WNPR

East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo, Jr. said the town has met its deadlines thus far under an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice's Office for Civil Rights. The investigation into East Haven's police department began in 2010. In a 2011 report, federal authorities found that police there intentionally targeted Latinos for traffic stops, and used excessive force against those taken into custody.

Common Ground High School

Students, administrators and elected officials gathered at the Common Ground High School in New Haven Tuesday to break ground on a new, state-of-the-art facility. Joel Tolman, the charter school's director of development and community engagement, said the new building will house science, art, performance, and athletic spaces. It will also model sustainability with a solar array, geothermal system, and other materials aimed at reducing climate change. 

Thomas MacMillan / The New Haven Independent

Campaign season in New Haven comes to an end in three weeks, when the mayoral election takes place on Tuesday, November 5. The two candidates have been busy, but one is drawing more heavily on financial support from city residents, while the other seems almost more poised for a gubernatorial run. That story and more in The Wheelhouse Digest.

Genghis Smith / Wikimedia Commons

By the looks of things, you, the Connecticut Taxpayer, will soon own a failing tennis tournament. You already own a really bad college football program, and you recently agreed to pay a man $750,000 to stop coaching it

Sujata Srinivasan

The ripple effects of the government shutdown are starting to extend beyond federal employees into the private industry. Small businesses are bracing for a range of issues from delayed regulatory approvals to a possible crunch in cash flow.

Vox Efx / Wikimedia Commons

We're in New Haven today, and The Nose, our weekly culture panel, wants to talk about the hazards of 3D movies and the increasingly competitive world of Halloween costumes. And because we're in New Haven, we'll turn our attention to a couple of prominent stories down here. One of them -- not for the squeamish -- is the Poopetrator, a laundry prankster who has created such a national stir that even the official account for Clorox bleach is tweeting about him.

Mark Pazniokas / CT Mirror

Dr. William Petit, the sole survivor of the brutal 2007 home invasion in Cheshire, has spoken with state Republican officials about a run for public office.

An anonymous Republican official told the Associated Press that Petit is considering a run for Congress. He has weighed in on public policy before, campaigning against the repeal of the death penalty in Connecticut.

Southern Connecticut State University

The national organization responsible for accrediting graduate library programs has voted to withdraw its accreditation of Southern Connecticut State University. The chair of the university's library program is asking them to reconsider.

The Grid New Haven

The job of software developer is one of the hottest occupations in the world right now, and demand for developers is only expected to accelerate. That poses a dilemma for startup technology companies here in Connecticut. In an incredibly competitive marketplace, how do they find and cultivate the right talent? One program in Connecticut is trying to come up with a solution.

Connor Harris / Creative Commons

The Metropolitan Transit Authority says Metro-North's New Haven line is back to full service today. The nation's second largest commuter rail line has been crippled since September 25, when a high voltage power feeder cable failed.

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