WNPR

New England

For the first time in decades, the length of the U.S. ski season is shrinking. And as climate change curtails winter’s length, an industry transformation is under way: one expert says most ski mountains in southern New England could be out of business in 25 years unless they diversify their offerings. But ski areas in northern New England could benefit.

Summer resorts around the nation are bracing for a tough season — not because the tourists won’t come, but because the workers might not. The reinstatement of a cap on visas for temporary workers has some in the hospitality industry predicting catastrophe.

Mike Acton / Creative Commons

Twenty years ago, a lot of Icelandic teens were drinking too much. But an innovative program changed that.

This hour, we talk with the American researcher who helped combat the problem by tapping into natural highs — like sports. If the program has worked, why aren’t other countries following suit? We find out.

AnneCN / Creative Commons

Tuesday’s winter storm packed a punch -- bringing some much-needed precipitation to Connecticut.

But was the wet weather enough to hoist the state out of a long-running drought? This hour, we find out and ask whether the region can expect to see consistent dry spells. 

Ryan Caron King / NENC

Like many school districts across the country, Providence, Rhode Island Public Schools have a rapidly growing population of English language learners and programs to help them learn their new language. The problem is the state doesn’t have enough teachers certified to teach these students.

Creative Commons / Community College of Vermont

Former Vermont Governor Pete Shumlin recently visited Wesleyan University to reflect on his career and discuss ways to combat climate change.

Peter Bienkowski

It’s 1975. Saigon has fallen to the North Vietnamese. The end of the war is the beginning of a global humanitarian crisis.

Fifteen years later, the poet Ocean Vuong and his refugee family arrive in Hartford. He is two years old. The first place they stay is in a hotel.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Many small towns in New England are eager to welcome refugees from the war in Syria, but that doesn’t seem likely under President Donald Trump’s shifting immigration policy.

St. Johnsbury Academy in Vermont has found a way around that -- they’re offering scholarships to refugees already living in the U.S.

Muslim immigrants have become an increasingly large part of the fabric of New England in recent years.

Group Helps Build Political Engagement in New England’s Muslim Community

Feb 21, 2017

Muslims in America are the subject of heated political debate. But they account for a very small number of elected politicians in New England.

One nonprofit, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is encouraging American-Muslims across the U.S. to run for political office. The group, called Jetpac, will train potential candidates regardless of party affiliation with the goal of increasing civic engagement within Muslim communities.

John H Gray / Creative Commons

Proponents of a plan to bring expanded intercity passenger rail service to western Massachusetts are getting support from Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy.

Department of Homeland Security / Labeled For Noncommercial Reuse

Reports of large scale, nationwide deportation raids are stoking fear in Massachusetts immigrant communities. Immigrants — both those with legal status and those living here illegally — are questioning exactly who is vulnerable for deportation. 

There are many challenges to farming for a living: It's often grueling work that relies on unpredictable factors such as weather and global market prices. But one aspect that's often ignored is the cost of health care. 

Environmental advocates say a planned natural gas pipeline in New England could cost ratepayers more than twice what’s currently projected. And they point to a study that says the pipeline could be unnecessary by as early as 2023.

Steve Hardy / Creative Commons

Year after year, hundreds of thousands of people find themselves homeless in the United States — including the young.

This hour, we explore local efforts to help homeless youth in Connecticut. What kinds of programs are out there to help them to not only find housing but employment, too?

Pages