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natural disaster

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has issued a new deadline for hurricane evacuees from Puerto Rico to sign up for help--June 18.

Catherine Boyce

This hour, Save the Children U.S. President and CEO Carolyn Miles joins us. We talk about her decades-long career and learn about the unconventional journey that led her to the Fairfield-based NGO.

It’s the latest conversation in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series, featuring prominent women with ties to the state. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A House bill to provide state aid for evacuees from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands is being held back by its sponsors. The move is being made because it likely wouldn’t have made it out of the appropriations committee.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The entire island of Puerto Rico lost power Wednesday morning-- its second major outage in a week.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Six months after Hurricane Maria, evacuees from Puerto Rico are still looking for affordable places to live. And they’re looking to the government for help, particularly through available public housing, but they’re not getting it.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A letter signed by Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin, Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim, New Haven Mayor Toni Harp, and six other mayors from Connecticut’s larger cities was sent to Governor Dannel Malloy Monday asking for assistance with evacuee families in three areas.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A two bedroom unit at Brick Hollow in Hartford comes with a refrigerator, a stove, and a washer and dryer.

Maribel Perez has five people that live with her and no money to stock her new apartment with basic furniture.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This week will mark six months since Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, devastating the island.

Since the storm, thousands of Puerto Ricans have moved to Connecticut to restart their lives. This hour, we hear some of their stories as we take stock of the continuing impact of the hurricane.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Connecticut Puerto Rican Agenda held a “Rally And Lobby Day for Puerto Rican Families” Wednesday in Hartford. The event was put on at the Capitol to get support for a disaster relief bill proposed in the House of Representatives.

Connecticut Puerto Rican Agenda

A rally for Puerto Rican families will take place in Hartford on Wednesday. Organizers of the event hope it will lead to the passage of a bill in the Connecticut legislature that will set aside money for hurricane relief.

It's no secret that we've had a rough fall and winter with natural disasters. Even as we write this, fires burn in Southern California, adding to the previous wildfires in the northern part of the state that burned over 245,000 acres in October.

Hurricanes Irma and Harvey devastated communities across Florida and Texas, while touching communities in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, the Carolinas and Louisiana.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

A 70-year old woman found dead in her car Wednesday night along a fire evacuation route in Ventura County is the first human fatality caused by wildfires that have scorched Southern California this week.

The Ventura County medical examiner said Virginia Pesola of Santa Paula, Calif., died due to blunt force trauma with terminal smoke inhalation and thermal injuries.

Updated at 10 p.m. ET

Driven by fierce Santa Ana winds, four intense fires near Los Angeles grew to engulf more than 115,000 acres Thursday, and officials say residents should continue to expect dangerous fire conditions, as both strong winds and very dry conditions persist.

Updated at 7 a.m. ET

A magnitude 7.3 earthquake that struck northern Iraq and parts of Iran has killed more than 400 people in both countries and injured more than 6,000, according to officials. It is the strongest quake to hit the region in years.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Much of Puerto Rico remains devastated six weeks after Hurricane Maria, with many areas lacking access to electricity and clean water. The disaster has led some Puerto Rican families to relocate to the mainland.

This hour, family ties bring many evacuees to Connecticut--so how is our state welcoming these new arrivals in our community?

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