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Native Americans

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we revisit our show on the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

Yale University said Tuesday it will remove a "problematic" doorway stone carving that depicts a Puritan settler aiming a musket at a Native American, a decision that follows criticism for initially covering up the musket with removable stonework.

Wikimedia Commons

Native Americans have been getting forced off their land for a long time. Thomas Jefferson forced them from their ancestral home in 1804 after he signed the Louisiana Purchase and promised they shall know the United States as only "friends and benefactors." 

MMCT

Governor Dannel Malloy has signed into law a measure that would allow the state’s two federally recognized tribes to build and run a third casino. But the legislation looks certain to attract legal action.

Thomas Hart / Wikimedia Commons

When you "pull a Benedict Arnold," you sell out your side to join the stronger side of a situation out of fear, not honor.  Needless to say, that's not a compliment.

More than 230 years after America secured independence from Britain, this skilled warrior and confidante of George Washington is remembered as a traitor and coward for defecting to the British side.

But it's not that easy.  

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center / Creative Commons

Long before our modern highways, there was an extensive network of Native American trails up and down the East Coast.

This hour, we hear about efforts to map these old trails and find out how they’re helping archaeologists and others learn about the past. 

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., ruled Wednesday that the Trump administration failed to follow proper environmental procedures when it granted approval to the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project.

It's a legal victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and environmentalists, who protested for months against the pipeline. Oil started flowing through it earlier this month. The tribe fears that the pipeline, which crosses the Missouri River just upstream of its reservation, could contaminate its drinking water and sacred lands.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Attorney General George Jepsen has concluded that the legal risks in authorizing a new third casino in the state of Connecticut are "not insubstantial." He issued his formal opinion to Governor Dannel Malloy on Monday. 

Michael Blann/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

Lawmakers are struggling with the legal risks the state may encounter in giving its blessing to a third casino in the state. The legislature’s Public Safety Committee heard more than nine hours of testimony in a public hearing Thursday, the majority of it on two bills which would open up commercial gaming in the state in different ways. 

Members of American Indian tribes, indigenous communities and their supporters are demonstrating today in Washington, D.C., calling on the Trump administration to meet with tribal leaders and protesting the construction of the nearly complete Dakota Access Pipeline.

The protest is partly led by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which has been battling the federal government for more than a year over an oil pipeline that members say endangers their drinking water and has destroyed sacred sites in North Dakota.

On Thursday morning, law enforcement entered the Oceti Sakowin camp to do a final sweep before officially shutting it down, ending a months-long protest against the completion of the nearby Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Oceti Sakowin camp was the largest of several temporary camps on the northern edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Protesters have been living on this land for months, in support of members of the Standing Rock Sioux.

Michael Blann/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

The partnership between the state’s two federally-recognized Indian tribes said it’s just days away from revealing where it would like to build the state’s planned third casino. East Windsor and Windsor Locks are the two towns still in the running. 

Local law enforcement officers have arrested some people who chose not to evacuate federal land near part of the Dakota Access Pipeline north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Most protesters had left earlier. At dusk, police moved back, and said they would not enter the camp at that time.

In North Dakota, authorities set Wednesday as the deadline for the dwindling number of protesters against the Dakota Access pipeline to clean up and go home.

At the main protest camp, a massive cleanup effort has been underway. Semi trucks have been hauling debris out of camp and people here are piling garbage into bags.

"It looks like a trash pile. But it's getting picked up and every spot is starting to look better and better as we work together," Dotty Agard of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe says as she sorts through abandoned goods.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

The Mohegan Tribe has applied for planning permissions for its redevelopment of the former Norwich State Hospital site along the Thames River. It marks a milestone in the long effort to revive the site. 

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