movies

Sunday night's Oscars will include a Best Picture race that's apparently narrowed to three films: 12 Years A Slave, Gravity, and maybe American Hustle. Matthew McConaughey for Best Actor? Maybe. Or Leonardo DiCaprio? What about Cate Blanchett, a seeming shoo-in despite Meryl Streep delivering, in August Osage County, the biggest, chewiest, most Oscar-friendly performance of all time?

Picture this: You're standing on a stage. You're the center of attention in an auditorium filled with over 3,000 people. Roughly 40 million more are watching you on TV.

No, this isn't a nightmare — it's the Academy Awards. Every year, the standout members of the film industry are presented with Hollywood's highest honor: an Oscar.

But what happens after you've won the coveted gold statue? What does it feel like to walk away from the flashbulbs and fans, and step into the quiet darkness behind the curtains?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

We have a question: Where does Adam Sandler watch the Oscars? Does he sit there with all the people who are actually up for awards, or is he home alone, with his baseball cap on backwards?

Chion Wolf

Remakes are easy. Money-makers are hard. We live in a sloshing sea of those movie remakes but it's rare for one of them to out gross the original. An exception, oddly enough, was the remake of "Clash of the Titans," which significantly outperformed its 80s predecessor. 

Comedy actor, writer and director Harold Ramis is best known for the 1984 film Ghostbusters, which he co-wrote and starred in along with Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd. Ramis had co-written and planned to star in the long-awaited Ghostbusters III — but did not get the chance. Ramis died Monday in Chicago from an autoimmune disorder. He was 69 years old.

Ramis co-wrote Animal House, Meatballs and Stripes. He co-wrote and directed Caddyshack and directed Murray in Groundhog Day.

Shirley Temple, who charmed the nation as a child movie star in the 1930s and went on to become one of the nation's diplomats in posts that included ambassador to Czechoslovakia during the Cold War, has died.

She was 85.

The Associated Press writes that publicist Cheryl Kagan says the actress, known as Shirley Temple Black in her private life, died late Monday evening at her home near San Francisco. Kagan tells the AP that Temple's family and caregivers were with her.

It's not even a matter of "snubs."

This year's Oscar nominations got it so wrong as to make a reasonable debate about what happens, going forward, almost impossible.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Nose panel went to the movies this week to see the critically-acclaimed Spike Jonze film, "Her," about a future world in which it's not unusual for a man to fall in love with his artificially-intelligent operating system. 

ToastyKen, Flickr Creative Commons

My two favorite film critics, A.O. Scott and David Edelstein, appear on the show today, and we've got a longer list of topics than we can possibly get to. I'm interested in the way a lot of the recent hit movies take little bites of our recent past: "Inside Llewyn Davis" tackles 1961. "American Hustle" bestrides the end of the 70s and beginning of the 80s. "The Wolf of Wall Street" started with the Crash of '87 and pans forward into the 1990s. Suddenly, for Baby Boomers, the stretch of our living memory is a series of period pieces and costume dramas.

Dennis Skley/flickr creative commons

Note: The web version of today's show (posted all the way at the bottom here) includes full, unedited, and unexpurgated film clips (which include some adult language) and runs more than four minutes longer than the show we did live on the air.

From Faith Middleton: If you saw When Harry Met Sally…, there was a wry, riveting exchange between the two main characters, Meg Ryan and Billy Crystal, sitting at a restaurant table, causing an observing customer to say, "I'll have what she's having."

I can't recall the detailed plot of that movie, but I will never forget that scene, and that's what drew all of us on our show to a new book by one of the great writers on film, David Thomson, film critic for The New Republic, and our interview guest.

"It was a miraculous year," film critic David Edelstein tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. At a time when Hollywood is churning out Blockbusters and superhero movies that are guaranteed to make money at home and overseas, "it's really great when so many interesting movies, somehow or other, manage to bleed through," he says. " ... You really feel as if directors are taking chances in their storytelling. They are creating a new syntax for every story."

Here are his favorite movies this year:

Robert Elyov on Flickr Creative Commons

Why should sex feel bad? It shouldn't, and Bill Gates is offering $100,000 to the inventor of a condom that puts the pleasure back in sex. And, it isn't just about pleasure. Scientists at the University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute say a "redesigned condom that overcomes inconvenience, fumbling, or perceived loss of pleasure would be a powerful weapon in the fight against poverty."

Flickr Creative Commons, ejmc

Flickr Creative Commons, Tony Fischer Photography

We had a big menu of things we could talk about on The Nose this week, but there was no possibility we weren't going to tackle "Accidental Racist,' the collaboration between country star Brad Paisely and rap star LL Cool J, mainly because of all the heat and light this song as generated among journalists and critics. 

A Look at Libraries

Mar 18, 2013
Calsidyrose/flickr creative commons

Think about your local library. Do you still picture a dusty old building full of dusty old books? Do you imagine little old ladies with their glasses down at the ends of their noses, shushing you every time you speak?

Today we’ll check in with the libraries of the 21st century. Ebooks, the Internet, audiobooks. Music, movies, videogames. Coffee bars, couches, comic books… And no shushing? It’s a whole new world in the world of libraries.

Flickr Creative Commons, Grmisiti

On the Nose today: Have you seen so many post apocalyptic movies and read so many books like "The Road" and those Justin Cronin novels, that you're almost too exhausted to participate in your actual dystopian future?

Chion Wolf (filtered through Instagram)

Crispin Glover is an actor, writer, director, recording artist and author. He's in our studio today.

Glover is very famous for two things. The movie "Back to the Future," in which he played the character George McFly at two different ages, and several very eccentric appearances on late night talk shows.

Wikimedia Commons

Actor John Hawkes says he doubts there will be a revival of HBO's critically-acclaimed series, Deadwood, but he's not ruling out the possibity of a movie somewhere down the line. 

"I skeptical," Hawkes says. "I would sign up immediately and I'm sure many others would, but the more time that passes, the more difficult that will be. The show itself was a hit, but wasn't a huge hit where there's maybe enough of an audience clamouring for a movie for them to have to make one, but we'll see - who knows.

Chion Wolf

So what kind of Oscar year is this? One in which two best picture nominees have been criticized by members of Congress for their inaccuracies. The dust-up between Connecticut Congressman Joe Courtney and screenwriter Tony Kushner is the more benign. Courtney asked director Stephen Spielberg to re-edit the film before it goes to DVD. He's concerned that classroom use of the film will pass along an untruth -- that two members of the Connecticut delegation voted against ratification of the 13th Amendment. Kushner, a mensch in my personal experience, has been surprisingly testy.

Ryan Baxter/flickr creative commons

Portraying Lincoln

Feb 12, 2013
Catie Talarski

It’s argued that no one can do as good of a job of portraying President Lincoln on film as Daniel Day-Lewis. 

Lincoln, the movie, is up for 12 Academy Awards. But weeks before the Oscars, Connecticut Congressman Joe Courtney is asking the studio to alter an inaccuracy that puts Connecticut on the wrong side of the slavery debate.

lwpkommunikacio, Flickr Creative Commons

I made today's Nose panelists go see Zero Dark Thirty, just to make sure we all had one controversy we could discuss.

 

That was before I realized how generous the week would be with controversy. The labyrinthine story of football player Manti Te'o and his imaginary girlfriend sneaked up on me. That's the fresh sports scandal making the wires buzz right now.

 But last night's sit-down between Oprah Winfrey and Lance Armstrong breathed new life into an old sports scandal.

 

Flickr Creative Commons, Dave_B_

Here are the topics we'll be talking about on The Nose today.

 

First, the onset of the Awards Season, which seems to coordinate somehow with the onset of flu season. The Oscar nominations are out. The Golden Globes are handed out on Sunday, and there lots of other awards rattling around right now, many of them with the word "choice" in their names.

  The movie awards are a little more meaty this year because three or four of the big films drag controversies along behind them.

Flickr Creative Commons, david_shankbone

A romantic comedy about a substitute teacher recently discharged from a mental hospital after eight months of not necessarily complete treatment for bipolar disorder.  His potential object of affection? A woman whose own experience of psychic trauma has led her into a spree of promiscuous behavior that results in the loss of her job. 

Chion Wolf

America's greatest living film critic David Edelstein comes to our studios today for a discussion of current films and, inevitably, the experience of seeing a film here in 2012.

Wikimedia Commons

We're going to be talking about Life of Pi on the Nose today, but let me get my two cents in ahead of time.

Animal House. Diner. Footloose. Tremors. Flatliners. JFK. A Few Good Men. Apollo 13. Sleepers. Wild Things. Mystic River. Frost/Nixon. X-Men: First Class.

Today: Kevin Bacon.

Movies For Your Ears

Nov 8, 2012
thetruthapm.com

Radio Drama is associated with a so-called “Golden Age” of radio in the 30s and 40s, before TV became the dominant medium. Today, Garrison Keillor’s “A Prairie Home Companion” is the best known program still presenting this traditional style.

Isaac's Live Lip-Dub Proposal in Portland, Oregon

The story of the Islamic world uprising over a very stupid, cheesy and deliberately provocative movie is too vast to discuss on one show, but on "The Nose" today, we'll break off a little piece of it that is the movie itself, including all the people who worked on it and now claim not to know what it was.

 Also on the topic list: elaborate marriage proposals, the latest one being the guy who faked his own gorey death. I give this union 18 months.

 But wait, there's more!

Chion Wolf

Every year the Berkshire International Film Festival screens films everyone knows are going to make a big spalsh.

This year, more than 70 independent films from around the country and the world, will be screened. We spoke with Kelley Vickery, co-founder of the festival and interviewed two documentary filmmakers about the changing role of thier craft.

Leave your comments below, e-mail colin@wnpr.org or Tweet us @wnprcolin.

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