WNPR

Mexico

Open Grid Scheduler / Grid Engine / flickr creative commons

As the Department of Homeland Security collects plans for the US-Mexico border, the conversation is turning more towards how border walls don't work in keeping people out.

This hour, we talk about what walls are effective in dividing: our psyches, our environments, and the populations around them.

The cellphone video is vivid. A Border Patrol agent aims his gun at an unarmed 15-year-old some 60 feet away, across the border with Mexico, and shoots him dead.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case testing whether the family of the dead boy can sue the agent for damages in the U.S.

Between 2005 and 2013, there were 42 such cross-border shootings, a dramatic increase over earlier times.

On Jan. 25, President Trump signed an executive order instructing construction to begin on a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Environmentalists and civil rights activists say the proposed wall on the southern border with Mexico is a threat to the environmental rights of the people who live on both sides of the border.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed two executive orders related to immigration and border security, moving ahead with his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico and to deport people who are in the country illegally.

Mexicans by and large have been excoriating their president for inviting Donald Trump for what looked like a state visit yesterday.

Journalist Esteban Illades of the Mexican news site Nexos called it “the most painful day in the history of the Mexican presidency.” Illades joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young with more about how the country is reacting to Trump’s trip.

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