It’s official. General Electric is now a Boston-based company. The former staple of Fairfield, Connecticut takes up its domicile in Massachusetts on Monday morning, some eight months after announcing it would leave the Nutmeg State.

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You've probably heard of MDs, medical doctors, but what about another type of physician: NDs? Naturopathic doctors now want to be allowed prescribing rights in Connecticut.

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The baby was born full-term and healthy, but now, just a few weeks later, lay limp and unresponsive, barely breathing.

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal is taking on the National Hockey League for what he calls "apathy and indifference" to concussions among its players.

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Dozens of Connecticut doctors accepted six-figure payments from drug and medical device manufacturers in 2015 for consulting, speaking, meals and travel, with six of the ten highest-paid physicians affiliated with academic institutions, new federal data show.

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A complaint filed with the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, and later withdrawn, described a culture of surveillance and fear at Bridgewater Associates in Westport

About four years ago, Kevin Sinclair inherited an army of clones. Very fluffy clones.

"Daisy, Debbie, Denise and Diana," says Sinclair, a developmental biologist at the University of Nottingham in England.

The sheep are just four of 13 clones that Sinclair shepherds, but they're the most famous because of their relation to Dolly, the sheep that made headlines two decades ago as the first successfully cloned mammal.

Connecticut is stepping up efforts to prevent the spread of the Zika virus. State officials met Thursday to announce additional prevention measures. Meanwhile, it’s West Nile season.

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Sepsis is always an emergency. But I bet many of you reading this don't know what it is. 

The CDC says there are over one million cases of sepsis in America annually -- many more globally -- and about 258,000 of those people die from it. It's the ninth leading cause of disease-related deaths and more people are hospitalized for sepsis every year than for heart disease and stroke combined. It's a major driver behind higher health costs.

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The Department of Veterans Affairs estimates up to 30 percent of former service members — from the Vietnam War to Iraq and Afghanistan — have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. 

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Last fall, Colin saw The Bloodstained Men and Their Friends demonstrating in New Haven.

They wear white coveralls with red stains on the crotches.

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Governor Dannel Malloy recently signed legislation that would expand Connecticut’s effort to combat the opioid epidemic. At the same time, he announced a partnership with a team of doctors from Yale University to help develop a strategic plan.

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Stamford’s Purdue Pharma, the company that makes the controversial painkiller Oxycontin, has responded to a damning article in The LA Times that accused Purdue of turning a blind eye to abuse of the powerful opioid.

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In hospitals across Connecticut and nationwide, workarounds to compensate for medication shortages are daily routines for treating patients -- and health experts say it’s not about to change any time soon.

Some acute-care drugs in short supply nationally are antibiotics, antipsychotics, intravenous saline, and morphineaccording to the most recent shortage list from the U.S Food and Drug Administration.

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Connecticut still ranks high among states in the use of antipsychotic drugs for elderly nursing home residents, but its rate of use has dropped 33 percent since 2011 -- a bigger decline than the national average -- new government data show.