medicine

Where We Live
4:06 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Delivering by C-Section

Theresa Morris is a professor of Sociology at Trinity College and the author of "Cut It Out: The C-Section Epidemic in America"
Chion Wolf WNPR

Over 30 percent of women deliver their babies by Caesarean section in the United States, a significant increase over the five percent of women undergoing the surgical procedure in 1970, and a change that, overall, has not improved the health of newborns.

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Trouble with Opioids
10:46 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Painkiller Overdose Deaths Strike New York City's Middle Class

What's in your neighbor's medicine cabinets may influence overdose risk in the community.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:12 pm

Drug overdoses are usually thought to afflict mainly the poor and troubled. But it looks like OxyContin and other opioid painkillers are changing the picture.

People in stable, middle-class neighborhoods are also dying from opioid overdoses, a study in New York City finds.

Opioids have become among the most popular drugs of abuse in the past decade, with deaths from overdoses of oxycodone, hydrocodone and codeine eclipsing those from heroin and cocaine combined.

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Sports Science
10:37 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Chinese Olympic Coaches and Trainers Visit UConn

Chinese coaches, trainers, and physicians will spend the next few days learning about the latest innovations in sports science.
Shawn Kornegay UConn

A delegation of Chinese Olympic coaches, trainers, and physicians will spend the next few days at the University of Connecticut's Kinesiology Department, learning about the latest research in sports science. The department is regarded as one of the best in the country. UConn professors will speak to the delegation about research on injury rehabilitation, sports nutrition, training, hydration, and particular concerns facing female athletes.

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The Faith Middleton Show
12:40 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

Slash Your Risk of Disease by 80 Percent

Credit Miranda Granche/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

Yale University Preventive Medicine expert Dr. David Katz says he has a four-step approach to keep disease away. His technique involves a change in diet, exercise, no smoking, and weight-control. Master the skill-set to bring these areas in line, and we'll have longer and healthier lives. If you believe genes play the leading roll, or that environmental factors mean we're probably going to die younger than we thought, Dr. Katz says he has data to show you otherwise.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:54 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Leaning Left

Dr. Brendan Killory is the Director of Epilepsy and Functional Neurosurgery at Hartford Healthcare Medical Group.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

David Wolman visited a Scottish castle designed for left-handed sword fights, and a Paris museum to inspect 19th century brains. He observed chimps with a primatologist who may help unravel the mysteries of handedness. He met with a left-handed satanist, an amputee whose left hand was reattached to his right arm. He's part of a left-handed episode of The Colin McEnroe Show

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Food
6:20 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Doctors Say Changes In Wheat Do Not Explain Rise Of Celiac Disease

About 40 years ago wheat breeders introduced new varieties of wheat that helped farmers increase their grain yields. But scientists say those varieties aren't linked to the rise in celiac disease.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 12:09 pm

Wheat has been getting a bad rap lately.

Many folks are experimenting with the gluten-free diet, and a best-selling book called Wheat Belly has helped drive a lot of the interest.

"Wheat is the most destructive thing you could put on your plate, no question," says William Davis, a cardiologist in Milwaukee, Wis., who authored the book.

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Medicine
3:34 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Big Pharma And Meth Cooks Agree: Keep Cold Meds Over The Counter

Key methamphetamine ingredient pseudoephedrine is most easily found in cold and allergy medicines.
Ann Heisenfelt AP

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 5:11 pm

Millions of Americans have seen the fictional world of meth use and production in AMC's Breaking Bad, but journalist Jonah Engle has spent a lot of time in the real world of meth.

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Epigenetics
3:37 am
Mon September 23, 2013

How A Pregnant Woman's Choices Could Shape A Child's Health

Does a glass or two of wine during pregnancy really increase the child's health risks? Epigenetics may help scientists figure that out.
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 8:58 am

Pregnant women hear a lot about things they should avoid: alcohol, tobacco, chemical exposures, stress. All of those have the potential to affect a developing fetus. And now scientists are beginning to understand why.

One important factor, they say, is something called epigenetics, which involves the mechanisms that turn individual genes on and off in a cell.

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Health Care
10:28 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Why More Expensive Insurance Can Pay Off

Hey, put that away. You've got the platinum plan.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 1:26 pm

One of the most far-reaching provisions of the federal health overhaul prohibits insurers from refusing to cover people who are sick or charging them more for policies.

Still, for people with serious medical conditions, the online health insurance marketplaces present new wrinkles that could have significant financial impact.

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News
4:39 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

New Study Shows Weight Bias Among Mental Health Professionals

Credit Tony Alter / Creative Commons

People with eating disorders like obesity could be getting treatment from a therapist with their own inherent weight bias, that's according to a new study from the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity.

The survey of 329 mental health specialists revealed that while almost all of them agreed it's important to treat obese patients with compassion and respect, they admitted that many of their colleagues have negative biases about their obese patients. 56 percent said they heard or witnessed other professionals making negative comments and fat jokes about obese patients in their care.

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Technology
3:45 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

An App for Researching Eyeball "Floaters"

Credit Gtanner (Wikimedia Commons)

Smartphone apps have been changing the way people track data about their health and fitness. Now a Yale University researcher has developed a smartphone app to gather data for medical research.

Dr. Jadon Webb says the idea began when floaters began interfering with his own vision. "I really came to notice a lot of spots in front of my eyes," said Webb. "A lot of things would look like cobwebs, or lines or shapes, that would move and seem to swim around inside my field of vision."

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News
1:12 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Diverse Gut Microbes, A Trim Waistline And Health Go Together

The tale of the tape may be told, in part, by the microbes inside you.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:39 pm

Scientists have discovered new clues about how microbes in our digestive systems may affect health.

European researchers found that the less diverse those microbes are, the more likely people are to gain weight, become obese and develop risk factors for serious health problems.

Evidence has been mounting in recent years that bacteria and other organisms in our bodies do a lot more than just help us digest food.

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News
3:42 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Kids With Costly Medical Issues Get Help, But Not Enough

Katie Doderer, with dad Mark, big sister Emily, and mom Marcy, has a rare medical condition that requires 24-hour use of a ventilator.
courtesy of the Doderer family

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 9:56 am

Katie Doderer is a very poised 15-year-old with short blond hair and a wide smile. She's a straight A student who loves singing, dancing and performing in musicals.

This could be considered something of a miracle.

"I have a complex medical condition known as congenital central hypoventilation – blah—syndrome. CCHS," Katie explains, stumbling on the full name of her malady. "Basically my brain doesn't tell me to breathe. So I am reliant on a mechanical ventilator."

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Technology
9:02 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Changing the Science of Concussion

The UNH Chargers scrimmage
Harriet Jones

Athletes and concussion. There's barely a hotter topic in all levels of sports right now as more coaches and players start to recognize the long-term debilitating effects of repeated head trauma.

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Science News
5:27 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Lyme Disease Far More Common Than Previously Known

Black-legged ticks like this can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.
CDC

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 300,000 Americans are getting Lyme disease every year, and the toll is growing.

"It confirms what we've thought for a long time: This is a large problem," Dr. Paul Mead tells Shots. "The bottom line is that by defining how big the problem is we make it easier for everyone to figure out what kind of resources we have to use to address it."

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Medical Technology
2:41 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Google Glass in the Doctor's Office?

Hartford Hospital is looking into medical uses for Google Glass.
Ariel Zambelich/WIRED (Creative Commons)

You've probably heard of Google Glass - the computer you wear like eyeglasses. The computer display is right in front of your eyes, and is navigated by voice commands.

Now Hartford Hospital has been given a pair of the futuristic glasses by Google to explore the possibilities of using Google Glass in life saving situations by medical personnel.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:40 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Salute To Urine!

Wikimedia Commons

In 1978, Indian prime minister Moraji Desai flustered Dan Rather during a Sixty Minutes interview by describing his health practice of drinking his own urine. I'm not sure how many people around the world do this for its supposed health benefits, but there are more than you might think. Rather was grossed out. Desai lived to be 99. So bottoms up! The list of people who have done this includes J.D. Salinger, the singer Kesha and the actress Sarah Miles as well as thousands of Americans who discovered Indian medicinal ideas during their immersion in yoga.

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Technology
2:25 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Google Glass in the Doctor's Office?

Ariel Zambelich/WIRED (Creative Commons)

You've probably heard of Google Glass - the computer you wear like eyeglasses. The computer display is right in front of your eyes, and is navigated by voice commands. Now Hartford Hospital has been given a pair of the futuristic glasses by Google to explore the possibilities of using Google Glass in life saving situations by medical personnel.

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The Wheelhouse Digest
12:39 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Marijuana and Energy

While we're busy being distracted by fake marriage proposals on ballfields, plants are growing in Connecticut, or will be if some in the state have their say. Those stories and more you might have missed.

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MEDICAL MARIJUANA GROWER APPROVED IN MIDDLETOWN
Former factory space may become quite "green."

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:41 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Prenatal Massage, Hypnobirthing, And Other Ways To Manage Having A Baby

Credit Nagobe, Flickr Creative Commons

Home birthing? Doulas? Midwives? Hypnobirthing? Prenatal massage? Today, we’re talking about alternative birthing.

Fifty years ago, it was pretty simple: you went to the hospital, they knocked you out, and you had your baby — while dad smoked a cigar in the waiting room. Or if no hospital was nearby, you gave birth at home and hoped a savvy neighborhood lady could to help out. In later years, the question became home birth versus hospital birth.

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Here & Now
1:17 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

New Alzheimer's Research Could Lead To Treatments

Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident Catherine Peake, in Washington, Feb. 6, 2012. (Charles Dharapak/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:55 pm

A new report in the journal Nature shows a significant step forward in figuring out what causes things to go wrong in the brain early on in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research could lead to new treatments.

More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is projected to triple by 2050. So there’s urgent demand for treatments — or even better, a cure — but so far, there has been little progress on that front.

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The Salt
11:18 am
Wed July 24, 2013

NYC Doctors Are Now Prescribing Fruits And Veggies

Take two of these and call me in the morning.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:22 pm

Doctors typically give patients prescriptions for medications. But a new program in New York City has doctors prescribing fruits and vegetables to obese or overweight patients.

Deputy Mayor Linda Gibbs and Health Commissioner Thomas Farley launched the Fruit and Vegetable Prescription Program Tuesday. It aims to give at-risk families greater access to healthy foods.

Under the program, obese or overweight patients can be prescribed Health Bucks redeemable for produce at local farmers markets.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:44 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Authors of Speaking for Spot and Made for Each Other

Alan Levine/flickr creative commons

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Medicine
4:29 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Making a Tough Marijuana Industry

Connecticut passed a medicinal marijuana law last year, but it could be some time before an industry grows in the state. So far, more than 700 patients are on a registry list. Next month, a committee will review the final nitty gritty in terms of regulations for a Connecticut's medical marijuana industry.

After that, the Department of Consumer Protection will begin to accept licenses for dispensaries and producers. Patients diagnosed with any one of 11 disorders ranging from multiple sclerosis to PTSD can qualify.

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The Faith Middleton Show
4:07 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

A New Understanding of ADHD in Children and Adults and The Thing You Think You

Tom Coppen/flickr creative commons

For over 100 years, ADHD has been seen as essentially a behavior disorder. Recent scientific research has developed a new paradigm which recognizes ADHD as a developmental disorder of the cognitive management system of the brain, its executive functions. Dr. Thomas Brown's A New Understanding of ADHD in Children and Adults pulls together key ideas of this new understanding of ADHD, explaining them and describing in understandable language scientific research that supports this new model.

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Where We Live
10:28 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Connecticut and the Business of Medical Marijuana

Scott Beale

  

Eighteen states, plus the District of Columbia, have changed their laws over the last few decades to allow for the usage of marijuana for medical purposes. Patients with a variety of chronic conditions say the drug is the only thing that can ease their pain. In California, the pioneering state in this effort, the widespread abuse of this system has prompted a scaling-back of the number of dispensaries.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:49 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

'Much Ado' About Wendy Davis' Abortion Filibuster

Flickr Creative Commons, ejmc

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News
11:13 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Alexion Breaks Ground on its New Headquarters

Courtesy Alexion Pharmaceuticals

Homegrown pharmaceutical company Alexion will break ground on its new headquarters in New Haven Monday. As WNPR's Harriet Jones reports, the move will also mean future hiring.

Alexion will build an eleven story global headquarters in New Haven's downtown crossing redevelopment, investing $100 million. The company began as an offshoot of research carried out at Yale, but moved out to Cheshire about 13 years ago, so spokesman Irving Adler says this is viewed as a homecoming.

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Pharmaceutical HQ
11:13 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Alexion Breaks Ground On Its New Headquarters

Courtesy Alexion Pharmaceuticals

Homegrown pharmaceutical company Alexion will break ground on its new headquarters in New Haven Monday. As WNPR's Harriet Jones reports, the move will also mean future hiring.

Alexion will build an eleven story global headquarters in New Haven's downtown crossing redevelopment, investing $100 million. The company began as an offshoot of research carried out at Yale, but moved out to Cheshire about 13 years ago, so spokesman Irving Adler says this is viewed as a homecoming.

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Where We Live
10:52 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Gut Check: Befriending Bacteria

creative commons

There are more bacteria in our bodies than there are human cells: about 10 microbes for every cell!

UConn microbiologist Joerg Graf says “If you took a person and removed all the human cells, you would still see the outline of a human body.”

So what are all these bacteria doing? And are they helping or hurting us?

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