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Pregnancy and childbirth bring on a range of emotions -- from excitement, to exhaustion, to the stress of physical pain.

Few, however, expect these experiences to result in human tragedy -- especially not in the death of a new or soon-to-be mother

This hour: the realities of maternal health and mortality. We check in with a team of doctors and reporters, and we also hear from you.

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET Tuesday
By the end of the day on Monday, three CEOs had announced they were leaving President Trump's American Manufacturing Council. Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier was the first to announce his resignation followed by Under Armour's Kevin Plank and Intel's Brian Krzanich.

The resignations came after Trump was criticized for his response to the violence at white supremacist events in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. The president, famous for his ability to be direct and forceful, was faulted for condemning violence "on many sides."

Courtesty Timothy Cohn

During the 1920’s, some Connecticut women took jobs painting watch dials with radium-laced paint. At the time, they didn’t know it was toxic. As these so-called “Radium Girls” began to die, their stories became part of a rallying cry for industrial regulation.

This hour, we talk about the "Radium Girls" of Waterbury with Kate Moore, author of The Radium Girls: The Dark Story Of America’s Shining Women

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Say you break your leg. Fortunately you have insurance, so you head to an emergency room that’s in your insurance network -- and you think, at least when it comes to your medical bill, you’re all good.

But a new study out of Yale University finds you may not be.

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It’s mosquito season and the Zika virus still remains a threat in many parts of the world — including here in the U.S.

This hour, we hear the latest on efforts to develop a Zika vaccine and we find out what researchers have learned since last summer about how the virus causes microcephaly in newborns. 

Derek Torrellas / C-HIT

When the lights power on in the operating room at Bridgeport Hospital, more than a half of the acute care team of surgeons peering from behind the masks are women. That’s unusual, given that only 28 percent of all surgeons in Connecticut are female, according to the latest figures from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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A key committee for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a first-of-its-kind recommendation this week, unanimously signing off on an experimental cancer treatment. Research for the treatment was funded, in part, by a Connecticut nonprofit.

For many scientists, turning the results of their research into tools, products or patents means navigating the challenging — and often foreign — world of business. However, a "Shark Tank"-like effort at the University of Vermont that connects research scientists with industry leaders may offer a solution.

Jackie Filson / WNPR

French pharma giant Sanofi is to acquire Meriden-based Protein Sciences, the company that makes the Flublok vaccine. The deal, announced Tuesday, is worth up to $750 million. 

Kremlin / Wikimedia Commons

President Trump left a trail of confusion when he left the G-20 Summit this weekend. While the president thinks he gained concessions favorable to the United States, many feel he isolated America from longstanding consensus on issues that define liberal democracy. Instead, he sought consensus with Vladimir Putin, despite the certainty by U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia interfered in the 2016 U.S. election. 

The U.S. is in the midst of an opioid crisis. Millions of Americans are addicted to the powerful prescription painkillers, and tens of thousands are dying each year from overdoses.

A new report out Thursday offers a bit of hope: Doctors are prescribing opioids less often, and the average dose they're giving patients has dropped, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

No corner of the health care system would be harder hit than Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for the poor, if Republican leaders in Congress round up the votes to repeal major portions of the Affordable Care Act.

GOP lawmakers have proposed winding down the Medicaid expansion that added 17 million people in 31 states and the District of Columbia under the ACA, and also eventually capping the program's spending per capita.

Ernesto del Aguila III, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) / Creative Commons

Researchers in Connecticut and nationwide are having a hard time recruiting minorities for clinical trials.

This hour, we find out why and we examine the impact on our health. Does mistrust of doctors and drug companies play a part?

allenallen1910 / Creative Commons

More and more, medical professionals in Connecticut are turning to tablets and cell phones to connect remotely with patients. It’s called “telehealth,” and it’s facilitating everything from after-hours examinations to post-surgery check-ins.

In 2010, Sonia Vallabh watched her mom, Kamni Vallabh, die in a really horrible way.

First, her mom's memory started to go, then she lost the ability to reason. Sonia says it was like watching someone get unplugged from the world. By the end, it was as if she was stuck between being awake and asleep. She was confused and uncomfortable all the time.

"Even when awake, was she fully or was she really? And when asleep, was she really asleep?" says Sonia.

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